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I have done a lot off searching and can't find any topic on this so I thought I would start one. I was doing a tune up on my 06 1000 today and when I went to take off the plug that covers the crank bolt to tun the crank in order to set the valves that hex hole in the cover stripped. Now what? What I'd did was simply take off the cover and turn the crank and set the valves. I am wondering how I can get that plug out now? Any ideas?
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Put a dimple in the plug at 9 o'clock with a punch, awl, ice pick etc. and a hammer. Put the point of the tool in the dimple and angle the tool upward at a 45 degree angle or a little higher. A series of light taps with a hammer should break it free.

Alternatives include grinding a slot and using a large, flat bladed screwdriver or drilling a couple of holes for a pin wrench. A screwdriver with a square or hex shank and a crescent wrench is best if cutting a slot.

 

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I once accomplished a valve clearance check on a TL1000 (basically the same engine) with a badly stuck timing plug by putting the bike in second or third gear (can't remember which) and having a friend slowly rotate the rear wheel until the timing marks lined up. (Take the spark plugs out first, which I hope is obvious.)

It took a several tries, but we got it done. Later on, it occurred to us that we could have done the same thing with maybe a little more control by using a socket on the countershaft with the transmission in gear to turn the engine.
 

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The factory plug on my 06, like yours most likely, seemed to be made of a special alloy consisting of melted down tin soliders and cheese. I ordered a replacement and had it in 2 days, complete with o-ring.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks to all. That is a perfect description Kurgan of the hardness of the metal used in the plug. Without much force at all that sucker just seemed to give way. And Rando, I did go for the I pack driver as soon as that sucker began to give way, but I went to the electric one and seared that sucker faster then I could say :furious:

Good ideas all and I shall give them a try. I'll begin with the ice pick idea, if it won't budge I'll leave it till next time I need to check the valves and try cutting that grove in the plug after I take off the side cover again.

I also thought of drilling a couple holes In the plug, one at the 12 o'clock and one at 6 o'clock and putting a couple bolts in the holes, then using a pry bar in between them to wrench it off.
 

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I just took a seized plug off of a '98 DR650 and I think it's the exact same part number. It wouldn't come off until I used a cold chisel and mallet after heating the casing with a torch. Unbelievably stubborn.

Watch that your tools don't slip or you can easily punch a hole in the case. Don't over tighten it when you put it back together - all you need to do is compress the o-ring. I don't think there is any oil pressure behind it. I'm a big fan of anti-seize too.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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I think most problems come from over tightening. Some of that is due to leakage. Making the plug tighter won't help. The seal comes from the O-ring. As long as the plug doesn't unscrew by itself, it is tight enough and more won't do anything for a leak. A thicker O-ring would be one possibility. The oil behind the plug is not under pressure.
 

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There's a very nice Yoshimura plug set that would work on the V-Strom. After chasing part numbers around for a while, I found that the part numbers are the same for the timing cover plugs on the DR-Z400 (and a zillion other models).

Doofy bronze color, but should pretty much end the issue...
PARTS :: DIRT :: ENGINE :: PLUGS - BOLTS :: YOSHIMURA :: SUZUKI :: DR-Z400SM :: Yoshimura Timing Inspection Plug Kit Magnasonian SUZUKI DR-Z400SM 2005-2009,2013




After replacing the crappy OEM plugs on a couple of Suzukis, I grease the threads whenever I take it out, and I make sure I break it loose a half turn every time I change the oil. Cheesy aluminum threads realllllly like to stick together -- it's a little stuck each time.
 
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