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Discussion Starter #1
I was wondering if anybody went this route, I want to keep the stock heat shields on the bike, as I plan on doing some touring, and I like the way they look, and they keep my bags from melting! But I do want more of that V twin sound, rather then just drilling the exhaust, why not have a shop cut it/ gut it and re baffle it, for a deeper tone? Anybody do this?? It should be cheaper then new pipes!!
 
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Have not seen it done yet, but would be interesting. I think that it might be easier to use a lorge hose clamp around a new can and attatch the guard to that. You might have to cut off the bracket on the original can that has the nutplate's on it and use that......
 
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Swedge said:
But I do want more of that V twin sound
Just remember, if by "that V-Twin sound" you mean that satisfying rumble that your Harley/V-Star/Boulevard/VTX riding friends have, you'll never get it from your 'Strom. The 'Strom's 90-degree v-twin just doesn't make the same sound as the 45-degree v-twins. (It also doesn't shake the bike to peices and beat the crap out of the rider's kidneys.) You can make your V-Strom's exhaust note louder, but this engine is a closer cousin of Ducati and Cagiva than it is of the Harley.

That being said, I like your idea. I too like the appearance of the stock cans, and IMHO every aftermarket system I've seen just looks "stuck on." Replacing the guts but keeping the outer shell sounds really cool. However, you may want to think about picking up some stock cast-offs on E-bay. That way you haven't ruined your system if it doesn't work. If it does work, you could alway sell your originals.

Good luck and keep us posted if you try this!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yeah

the part about most exhaust looking just "Stuck on" is so true!! particularry the ones that use HOSE CLAMPS to hold the cans to the bike!! BTW I HATE the HARLEY sound... I am looking for more of that DUC sound!!! right now its just too quite... My Big thumper Dirt bike has a nicer growl... I want its Bark to match its Bite!!
 

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Modifying the stock exhaust, like someone said is going to be hit and miss to get what your looking for. The engineers spend a lot of time of designing a complete silencer to do many different things. Taking an area away may have adverse effects or just sound bad. Such as a hissing or raspy note.

Also where does one decide to cut. The main body is full of many diff baffles and tubes. If I am not mistaken their is also a catalyst section for further gas cleansing.

I cut my front cone off and turned it 180 degrees to change the inlet location for my low mount system. The front angled cone is completely open with about a .25" perf and packing on the walls for sound. My low mount system can use the orig can or my own oval can. I have a thread here somehwere with more info.
 
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Re: Yeah

Swedge said:
the part about most exhaust looking just "Stuck on" is so true!! particularry the ones that use HOSE CLAMPS to hold the cans to the bike!! BTW I HATE the HARLEY sound... I am looking for more of that DUC sound!!! right now its just too quite... My Big thumper Dirt bike has a nicer growl... I want its Bark to match its Bite!!
I think you may have misunderstood me. What I meant about the hoseclamps was not to hang the exhaust with them. But to attatch the original exhaust guard with them. Like this...install new exhaust can, cut off brackets from original can that has nutplates for guard. Attatch said brackets with clamps to new can. Screw on guard. I will send pics if you send a new can of your choice. I would be happy to mount it to my bike so you can figure it out :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ok

But have you seen the pictures of most after market exhausts Except for the stautunes? they all use Hose clamps!!
 
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Maybe some of you haven't seen this photo...



Keep in mind that this can happen if too much material is removed.



Like this...

 
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Before you do all that.

Find a 12" long 1/2" drill bit (westlake hardware) and place it in the end of your muffler using a flashlight to center it on the baffle wall you see in there. Rap it with a hammer to dimple your spot to drill then drill the 1/2" hole in the baffle wall. Now if you take a coat hanger and straighten it out you will find that you can reach all the way down into the header pipe. There is only one baffle wall in your muffler.

If you want more sound find a 1" drill bit that will fit a half inch drive drill (you can probably borrow the half inch drive drill from a friend who has one. Get a piece of steel rod about 10" long that is 1/2" in diameter. Then get a steel bushing with a 1/2" inside diameter and now you can make a long 1" drill bit by welding these 3 pieces together that will reach the baffle wall.

Drill a 1" hole in the baffle wall and you should get that duc sound that will still be quiet on the highway but louder than stock at idle and loud at full throttle. The best part of this is your muffle retains the stock appearance and if you decide you dont like it you can get a 3/4" pipe plug of the allen socket type and it will screw tightly into the 1" hole you made in the baffle wall and you will be back to stock quiet sound.

If you decide to plug it with the pipe plug be sure and tape the allen socket to your extension so it won't come off when you pull it out of the pipe plug. And use some kind of gasket sealer to glue the pipe plug to the allen socket (don't let it dry all the way but just set up so the pipe plug won't fall off the allen socket before you can get it to the hole you made in the baffle wall) Once you screw it into the hole you made you won't be able to get it back out of the muffler so make sure you want to go back to stock before you do. And don't screw it in super tight but just pretty snug. If you screw it in too far and it goes all the way through the hole you will have to take off your muffler and shake it out the header pipe. Pipe plugs are tapered so it will tighten up as you screw it in.

I have a 1" hole in my baffle wall and have had for quite a while and am real happy with the sound. Plus like you I like the look of my stock mufflers. I have a 1000 and did both my mufflers this way.
 
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Yeah - I did that modification first. It adds almost no extra sound - I still couldn't hear it on the freeway.
 
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I didn't want to hear it on the freeway. Just around town, at idle, and when I gas it. A loud exhaust droning down the freeway on a long trip gets irritating after a while. This is just a good compromise.

Most all touring bikes except Harley's are quiet for a reason.
 
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Now for the disclaimer, any modification you make to your stock exhaust to get more sound will probably give you more sound BUT you will lose some performance most likely.

The reason why is exhaust velocity. Remember when your exhaust was stock and you started your bike up how you could put your hand about a foot behind the muffler outlet and feel the exhaust hitting your hand? That's because of the exhaust velocity the engineers designed INTO the stock system to help with cylinder scavenging to better fill the cylinder with the fresh intake charge.

But I know what you are saying, "the stock exhaust is too restrictive to allow the most power mostly because of noise regualtions the bike has to pass before it can be sold and that's why aftermarket systems reduce backpressure and are louder than stock".

So it is a balance between trying to reduce backpressure yet keep the exhaust velocity up for scavenging purposes. Too little backpressure (modding your exhaust yourself) and now you don't feel the exhaust hitting your hand quite as hard and your system isn't scavenging as efficiently as it was causing most likely a loss of torque through the low to mid range of the powerband. Too much backpressure and your engine is all choked up and won't make best power.

I am still learning about this balance between backpressure and keeping the speed of the spent gasses exiting into the header pipe up. It is a very interesting subject and the problem designers of aftermarket systems try to address.

How do you attain the best balance between exhaust velocity and backpressure when designing a muffler?

The goal is to attain the highest exhaust velocity with right amount of backpressure.

Too much backpressure slows down the flow.

Too little backpressure slows down the flow.

It's a really cool subject.
 

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It's a bit off topic but I rode with a guy that had Yoshimura race pipes on his SV-1000 and it was one of the coolest sounding bikes I've ever heard. I wouldn't want to listen to it all day long but it was always fun to hear the SV fire up in a crowd of fours and my factory quiet DL.

The guy riding behind me said my bike sounded like a bumblebee caught in a coffee can. :roll:
 
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I have heard those pipes on a SV1000 and they do sound cool. Because we don't have the 3 bolt flange that slip ons normally bolt to and since we require a short header pipe on the inlet of the can to connect to our system not many manufacturers are interested in making slip ons for our bikes as they are more expensive to mass produce.

I am still waiting for D&D to make cans. They said the Strom is on the list.
 
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Swedge,
My 2003 dl1000 has had the stock pipes drilled and I am rying to get back to the good old Japanese quiet. The exhaust note is impressive and people have stopped me at traffic lights to tell me how good the bike sounds (performance muscle car sound - not obnoxious Harley sound); however, it just wasn't my style, I've never made noise to draw attention to myself like that before - not even with my stereo :p . I recently bought a set of stock pipes from a member on the board. I will sell you this reworked set if you want but I wouldn't cut your stock pipes if I were you - because once you do, you can't go back, and those things are pricey! Let me know and I can get you pictures and sound recordings. HTH.

- Chad
 
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Senecagreen.. how did your engine performance change from the 1" mod in the back plate. Also, do you run a power commander or a DFO and still have the stock mapping? Just curious, I would like a little more Vtwin sound but don't wanna lose any performance. I would probably try the 1/2" mod instead. Some of the guys over at the V-Strom forum drill into the backplate, or should I say "front plate" that is between the outlet pipe and the exhaust cap. :D Some like the sound... others think it sounds like an exhaust leak. :lol:
 
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My 2003 dl1000 has had the stock pipes drilled and I am rying to get back to the good old Japanese quiet.

Mind if I ask what kind of mod was done to your cans. There are several ways to drill the cans, different size holes, number of holes and where you drilled.
 
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Burton,
The 'bike was modded when I bought it off the original owner. I can contact him and see what mod he did. I believe there are 5 small holes drilled around each exhaust outlet. I can take a photo and post a picture it you want, probably woudn;'t be until tuesday though.

- Chad
 
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