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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Now I know this is not rocket science for many but - I was not able to find a thread that had this procedure in pictures. Dunno, I like pictures. Gives me a bit of confidence when I start on something I never did. So here we go - pictures!

The story:

- I wanted a longer front brake line so I can add taller risers; ABS Wee does not have enough really.
- I bought the line from Blair at SV Racing Parts a while ago; We talked on the phone back then and he told me what to do.
- As I was doing a bunch of 15K maintenance myself, I did this too today; so that's why the plactics is off. Note: I never did brakes before. So there is likely a better way to do this, with different tools etc.

Firstly - as I dont have a centerstand, this is how I kept the bike upright:



(and yes - the white stuff on the radiator is a small coolant leak I fixed today too)

On the side of where the work was to be done, I put some old tshirts to catch any drops of brake fluid before they hit my paint:



Opened the master cylinder; a few drops came out:



Sucked as much fluid as I cold from the top using my Mityvac:



Cracked the bleeder screw on the right caliper only; sucked the fluid from there (from the lines) with Mityvac too:



A close-up... fluid coming out:



After no more fluid, unscrewed the bolt holding it all in place on the right side, above the fender. This is where the line to be exchanged ends:



Showing how it is all put together; note the washers:



Unscrewed it all, caught all the pieces, pushed the end of brake hose out of the way. Here is how the hardware looks like: old (original) set on top; new (came with the line) on the bottom. I am guessing it is perfectly acceptable to use OEM again too but I used the new because I had it:



New stuff in place; follow the same sandwich pattern with washers:



Unscrewed the master cylinder side:



New, with new brake line top:



That is now attached too:



From this point on, it is all bleeding brakes. What I did was poured fluid on top, then sucked from the bottom with Mityvac. When I started getting fluid, I took the pump off and then pumped the brake lever while in the bottom, the Mityvac catch container was still connected. I made sure to never run out of fluid on top. After 3-4 master reservoars of fluid, there appeared to be no bubbles anymore so I tighetened the bottom. Then I put the bike on the sidestand, thinking that this will make the brake cylinder the highest point in the brake system (as opposed to upper banjo bolt). I then pumped the brake a few more times observing additional bubbles rising up in the master cylinder. I also - to be sure - unscrewed the top master cylinder bolt (in pictures above) to let any air that might be in it escape, with a few drops of brake fluid.

Then I filled up the master cylinder, pumped a little more, closed it up and let it sit with brake lever tied in pressed position. Pumped a little bit more etc after a while. I'll leave it pressed/tied all night and check it tomorrow but it feels like stock already.

Hope this helps someone!
 

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For the lazy among us (and I count myself in that group) you don't have to bleed the system to change the hose.

When I changed out my front brake line I sucked out the contents of the reservoir, and then just cracked open the hose connection to the master cylinder. I then removed the bolt at the distributer block and let the few drops of fluid left in the hose drain out into a jar.

After installing the new hose you just refill the reservoir and slowly and patiently pump the air out with the brake lever. (Recommended procedure here is bottle of beer in left hand and brake lever in right hand. Pump brake lever until beer is finished, and air should be purged. :mrgreen: )
 

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Confused with brake bleeding procedure

So I installed the new brake line , filled the master with fluid and have began the pumping process. My question is do you leave the air nipples open on both side of the front brakes while pateintly trying to bleed the air out and then close them for when you tie back the break lever for an extended period of time?
 

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HELP my fellow we-stromers

I have pro tapers and just bought 2'' rox raisers, the brake line is completely stretch so to fit the new raisers I WILL need longer lines . So I was wondering how long should the new line be on the ABS bike? also I want to get the steel lines in case a comet strikes the bike. Won't be doing this myself, but don't want to be ripped with chinese made lines in the workshop So I will buy them beforehand.

Thanks!
 

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Longer brake line

I bought the kit from svracing parts. I ordered on Sunday and it arrived on Wednesday. I plan to have the dealer install as I do not have equipment and what may take them 30 minutes would take me a lot longer despite this excellent write up. I have to go in for my 600 ,mile oil change and check. Yes I have anew vstrom. :yikes:. I'd rather be riding than working on the bike. Besides I have to install the riser that looks straightforward and Suzuki saddlebags I hope will be in tomorrow or Friday.

This forum is full of info and saves a lot of missteps for a newbie like me.

Thanks
 

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Thanks much for this writeup. This is precisely what I needed, since I have never done brakes before. Two questions:

1) Is there a reason you only bled out the right caliper, and not the left?

2) If your aim is also to replace all the brake fluid, do you need to do the left? If so, how does that change the refilling/bleeding procedure?

Thanks,
Nathan
 

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My question is do you leave the air nipples open on both side of the front brakes while pateintly trying to bleed the air out
No. The fluid would drain out by gravity. Pumping the brake lever would pump the fluid out faster.

Keep in mind that the air bubbles rise in the fluid. The bleeder on the caliper is above the point where the hose enters the caliper, so the air in the caliper rises to the bleeder. The air rises in the brake hose to the master cylinder, and it can be really tedious to get it all out there. As the OP noted, cracking the banjo bolt at the master cylinder lets a few bubbles of air out, but it'll take more than one try. Tying the brake lever down and leaving it for hours opens the master cylinder and lets the air bubbles rise by gravity and get out of the system. If you bleed off too much and let the master cylinder reservoir go dry, you let more air in and you get to start all over.

Bleeding both calipers is needed for a full renewal of the fluid, recommended every two years.
 

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Getting ready to install an extended brake line and 2" Rox risers on my Wee - can anyone help point me towards the part numbers for the replacement bolt and washers shown below? I've been poking around Oneida Suzuki's website but not having any luck. Thanks!

Unscrewed it all, caught all the pieces, pushed the end of brake hose out of the way. Here is how the hardware looks like: old (original) set on top; new (came with the line) on the bottom. I am guessing it is perfectly acceptable to use OEM again too but I used the new because I had it:



New stuff in place; follow the same sandwich pattern with washers:

 

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Hey guys, I don't mean to revive this thread, but it's my post on the forums (been reading quite a bit). I just completed this front brake line replacement this week to throw some 2" Rox risers on my recently acquired 2011 wee. I wouldn't have been able to do it if it weren't for this post! Just had to say thanks. So much information on this forum, it's incredible.
 
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