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Discussion Starter #1
All Aluminum NUT and STEM

Well I slightly boogered the threads on my steering head

Some galling happened

Does anyone (probably Greywolf) KNOW the thread size of the bearing retainer nuts ?

I would buy the correct thread repairing file

The steering stem is ONLY $500

I am sure that a triangle file will make repairs but I would do it right if possible. There was evidence of GREEN locktite which is the forever bearing retainer color on the threads

I have ordered 1 nut
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Neither the nut nor the stem are aluminum. I don't know the thread pitch. You could buy a replacement nut as you'll one anyway and use a thread gauge to determine the pitch.
 

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What Kinda Bike Is That?
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Neither the nut nor the stem are aluminum. I don't know the thread pitch. You could buy a replacement nut as you'll one anyway and use a thread gauge to determine the pitch.
The "acorn nut" at the top of the stem is not aluminum. The two locking nuts, below the "acorn nut" are aluminum.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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The two locking nuts, below the "acorn nut" are aluminum.
I just went out to the garage and stuck a magnet to mine. Aluminum fasteners are pretty rare and limited to low strength applications. The top of the two special nuts is spec'd at 58lb-ft. No way will an aluminum fastener be spec'd to handle that level of torque.
 

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What Kinda Bike Is That?
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I just went out to the garage and stuck a magnet to mine. Aluminum fasteners are pretty rare and limited to low strength applications. The top of the two special nuts is spec'd at 58lb-ft. No way will an aluminum fastener be spec'd to handle that level of torque.
Damn, your good, and a really good idea of yours!

Of course, that made me go downstairs to check my bike too, with a magnet. Actually, I had to go to the horse stall next door to the "plane" stall. (Remember that space next to where your bike was parked?)

The magnet I have is one of those "mechanic magnets" that is on the end of telescoping handle. Unfortunately, the diameter of the magnet is of a size that is larger then I would like for testing the alloy of the stem nuts.

As I slid the magnet in, it was "attracted" to the steel washer between the two locking nuts, or to the top of the stem, (I am working with a Mini Mag flashlight, so everything isn't a well illuminated as I would like it to be!).

Anyway, I WILL take your word that the lock nuts are steel. However, they are of an alloy that is more "aluminum-like" then "steel-like"! If a person isn't careful, they can bugger up the notches cut in the nuts, quite easily when working with them.

As to the torque value that you mention, you know my feelings about this. I passionately disagree with this value, and I NEVER use a torque wrench on this part of my bike.

Thanks for checking on this. Doing so, got me back in touch with my hibernating friend.

B.L.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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That torque value is only for the top nut of the two. It has little to do with the pressure on the bearings. It's the bottom one that determines the pressure. The nuts do have a chromium content to prevent rust so are softer than a normal nut. Whether they have enough to meet the standard for stainless steel, I don't know but their magnetic attraction is significantly lower than regular steel.
 

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What Kinda Bike Is That?
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The nuts do have a chromium content to prevent rust so are softer than a normal nut. Whether they have enough to meet the standard for stainless steel, I don't know.
Well, I can tell you that, they are nothing like the stainless steel that I work with in the boatyard! The lock nuts are much softer then the stainless steel that I am used to seeing, and working with. That is why I would have sworn that they were aluminum! But, your information makes sense.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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It's the same deal with the fairing screws if you can remember them, and the axles and axle nuts. They are softer than ordinary steel. There are wide variances in SS.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Oh, and the galling mentioned is kind of a trademark of SS, like the rear axle nuts. A little anti seize might be a good idea in this case too.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
MY steering head stem is Aluminum and the 2 spanner type nuts that apply load to the bearings are odd.

They are NON Magnetic but very light. They are more scatch resistant than AL. If it wasn't a cheap sh*t MC I am thinking Titanium. A well heatreated 7075 can be pretty hard/strong though

Regardless its a PITA

Yes I think the TANG on the lock ring gets driven slightly into the threads when you are applying necessary force to release the "lock" nut.

The lower one had little torque on it and spun easily at first. Then while I was distracted so my bouton could blow the ship horn by the island it ran into the threads mashed by the lock ring.

If I knew the threads looks like 2 per mm then I would spend th $20 for a metric thread saver file at mcmaster. However if you mismatch that with the correct one you make a complete mess of it.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Really. It's stainless steel. High chromium content stainless is non magnetic.
 

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What Kinda Bike Is That?
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Oh, and the galling mentioned is kind of a trademark of SS, like the rear axle nuts. A little anti seize might be a good idea in this case too.
There are times when, (again at the boatyard), we would use silicone bronze nuts on stainless steel machine bolts to prevent gauling. Stainless steel nuts, spun on to stainless steel threads, can be a troublesome pair!

I have never had any trouble with the rear axle nut. Then again, this is another place that I DON'T use a torque wrench!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Well I bought a very fine triangle file

Under magnification dressed the boogered threads

Futher down it looked like there was a metal chip wedged in one of the threads.

All is well now and the good nut spins right on
 

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My metric thread file has eight different thread pitches -- I'm sure one of them would have fit the threads you were working with.

In other words, you didn't need to know the exact thread pitch before ordering the file.

Get a metric thread file anyway -- it's one of those hard to find tools that can save the day on a regular basis.
 
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