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Discussion Starter #1
2012 with about 50k miles. Stator replaced about 10k miles ago and regulator replaced with updated recall unit last summer, maybe 2500 miles ago. I have a advmonster voltage gauge on the bike. Typically it reads 12.2 volts or so when l turn the key on and 13.7 or so running. For a couple mornings it has shown 11 volts when l turn the key on and 11.7-12 volts running. If l turn the bike off and restart it it shows my usual 12.2/13.7 volts. It starts and runs fine regardless of the volt meter readings. After getting home yesterday l checked the battery with a multimeter, key off, and it read 13.4 volts. I am going to swap the volt meter with one of my other bikes and see if the issue goes away.
Any one else have a similar issue. If so what was your solution??
273519
 

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You really need to check your numbers with a good meter.

Even the fact when you turn your ignition on you get 12.2 that seams very high, with the headlights pulling power that should be in the 11's
 
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You might check the connections for the advmonster voltmeter. Something could have gotten loose or corrodes making a poor connection. I would trust a handheld voltmeter more than I would a tiny digital one.
 

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Check your battery voltage with the multi-meter in the morning before starting the bike. Battery voltage reading is only reliable after the battery has rested. Then you can see the variance between the battery and the ADVMonster DVM.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
OK , l used a little newer multimeter, still a budget piece. Battery in morning, key off 12.96 volts. Key on, not running at battery 12.50 volts. Key off ADVmonster dvm off headlight leads 11.3 volts, multimeter 11.29 volts. Running advmonster dvm 11.0, multimeter 10.98, battery 12.4 volts. I tried restarting it several times, and the voltage stayed pretty much the same. It is not charging now.... l guess l should go back to checking the stator output to help figure out if it is the stator again or the regulator.
 

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OK, I really don't like your ADVmonster DVM OR there is a poor connection or two in the harness because that is a lot of lost voltage between the battery and the DVM. Or maybe it is because you are tapping the headlight leads for the DVM. Why did you connect the DVM that way? Run some wires from the ADVmonster DVM directly to the battery and compare those readings to the ones you have here today. If the readings are correct then try connecting the DVM to a switched source like the tail light wire.

Yes, more bad news with it not charging. What kind is the new stator you put in? No way that should fail in 10,000 miles. Maybe your magnets have moved?

Cheers,
Glenn
 
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Agree. The headlight wires are probably the worst place to tap into for a voltmeter. The current for the headlights runs from the battery via the master fuse to the ignition, back to the fusebox, to the right handlebar (EU spec bikes with a switch there), crossover to the left handlebar, back to the fusebox and then to the front. A significant amount of voltage is lost along the way in wiring, fuses, connectors and whatnot. To the point where a relay starts to make a lot of sense. In fact, you may now just see the first trace of burning/charring in one of these connectors. Noticed any problems with the headlights recently?

Check out the Eastern Beaver PC-8 relay kit for the V-Strom. It prevents a load of problems in the future with burned connectors, and makes your headlights noticeable brighter.

Anyway, yeah, the voltmeter should be connected to the battery using wiring that is reserved for that voltmeter, or carries very little other current.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
OK, I really don't like your ADVmonster DVM OR there is a poor connection or two in the harness because that is a lot of lost voltage between the battery and the DVM. Or maybe it is because you are tapping the headlight leads for the DVM. Why did you connect the DVM that way? Run some wires from the ADVmonster DVM directly to the battery and compare those readings to the ones you have here today. If the readings are correct then try connecting the DVM to a switched source like the tail light wire.

Yes, more bad news with it not charging. What kind is the new stator you put in? No way that should fail in 10,000 miles. Maybe your magnets have moved?

Cheers,
Glenn
I agree with the volt meter not being in an optimal spot. But it did all l needed it to. It told me l had an issue. I replaced the stator with a Suzuki oem unit. At the same time l checked and epoxied the magnets. The bike has led headlights and don't have any issues. The ADVmonster DVM reads the same as both of my multimeters at the same connection, and has been giving me consistent readings for a couple of years. I have three more of them on other bikes and never had an issue.

Hopefully l just have a bad connector or something in the charging circuit. l will do some more testing tomorrow.
 

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The headlight wires are probably the worst place to tap into for a voltmeter.
I have a small digital voltmeter plugged into the low-beam circuit on the H4 headlight connector that is free from using an EB headlight relay with no issues. Voltmeters draw virtually no current so its contribution to the load is nil, even if I had it on the active headlight circuit. Only downside is that it goes off if I use the hi-beams but I rarely need that. It does have about a 0.4V difference from the battery as measured by a hand-held DVM so I just add that in to get the state of the battery. While cruising I typically see 13.7/13.8V which translates to 14.1/14.2V at the battery so all is well.

I couldn't make much sense of the numbers and odd behavior the OP posted except a failing stator. The trick with reading a voltmeter is you learn its normal pattern after which you are looking for a change in that norm. OP has already crossed that bridge and the test at the battery seems to confirm no charge. Since the R/R was last thing touched I would check for loose or corroded R/R connectors but if it was my bike I would also test stator AC output just to be safe. The symptoms are very similar to when my K7 Wee stator went -- I just noticed that idle volts were atypical low and it took a few more RPMs to get up to 13V so it was still charging but AC test failed and I caught it early.

Stator Questions
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I just checked the three stator leads to each other and l don't have a short to ground. I checked voltage to pairs and one pair is dramatically lower, 60,60,18 volts. Does this lead me to the magnets moving or is it still a stator problem?
 

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I just checked the three stator leads to each other and l don't have a short to ground. I checked voltage to pairs and one pair is dramatically lower, 60,60,18 volts. Does this lead me to the magnets moving or is it still a stator problem?
Check each stator lead to a good ground. Any change in your meter reading indicates a shorted winding.
 

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I you have .2 - .5 Ohm between any two leads and infinity to ground, I would say it's time to look at the magnets.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Great. I have .2 ohms between each pair of leads. I'll get a gasket on order, and hold off on the stator for now.
 

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I think it is a bad stator. Per GW in the link I posted, 60VAC is the absolute minimum so you have a shorted coil (the 18 VAC) in one of the phase wires which is dragging down the other two phases to 60VAC. I don't think shifted magnets could cause this since AC volts is measured as RMS average so you can't see shifted magnets unless you put it on a oscilloscope to see the wave forms. (Read the thread in my link, I asked this question in my thread and @Trepidator explained it, albeit it is a bit technical). Once I replaced my stator I got 66.8VAC on all three phases.
 

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I think it is a bad stator. Per GW in the link I posted, 60VAC is the absolute minimum so you have a shorted coil (the 18 VAC) in one of the phase wires which is dragging down the other two phases to 60VAC. I don't think shifted magnets could cause this since AC volts is measured as RMS average so you can't see shifted magnets unless you put it on a oscilloscope to see the wave forms. (Read the thread in my link, I asked this question in my thread and @Trepidator explained it, albeit it is a bit technical). Once I replaced my stator I got 66.8VAC on all three phases.
The voltage reading was more of a comparison that an absolute. But one pair is considerably lower than the other pairs. I just talked with another friend who ran a repair shop for years, He also agreed it is a stator. He also made the comment that Suzuki has the worst charging system of the modern motorcycle. He spent plenty of time replacing GSXR stators.
 

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The voltage reading was more of a comparison that an absolute.
I just looked it up in the service manual (for my Wee) and there is an absolute spec of 60VAC minimum per phase at 5000RPM. There is no spec for relative measure but I'd think that due to symmetry all three phases should be within the margin of measurement error so +/- 0.5VAC (?) or less.

I just talked with another friend who ran a repair shop for years, He also agreed it is a stator. He also made the comment that Suzuki has the worst charging system of the modern motorcycle. He spent plenty of time replacing GSXR stators.
I think all motorcycle charging systems are crap, a consequence of squeezing so much power out of such a small generator in a harsh environment, and Suzuki isn't the worst of the bunch from what I have read. If you want to put this problem to bed, I would replace the stator with a new OEM stator and a series R/R which uses a different method of controlling the voltage which isn't as hard on the stator. Suzuki has seen the light and the latest Vee's use a series R/R so maybe that would fit and plug right in for your model but don't know that for sure. Do a forum search on series R/R for details. Enjoy the rabbit hole!

My L4 Wee had the stator recall but stil has the OEM shunt R/R which I am planning on replacing soon to avoid issues down the road.
 

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I second pretty much everything DMF said. Definitely a stator. I’ve heard that rev happy riding can shorten the life of the charging system, but I can’t say I’d sacrifice fun for the longevity of a stator. As for Suzuki having bad charging systems, I hear stuff like that all the time in the automotive world too. When you REALLY start looking into it, companies like Bosch and Nippon/Denso make the majority of electrical parts for everybody from Ducati to Ford. The regulator upgrade is worthwhile too, especially if the bike is already down for maintenance. There are kits on EBay that include the regulator and connectors and the wiring is super easy. DC Positive and negative output and the three AC stator inputs. The old school regulators hear up quite a bit and are less efficient than the newer ones too. I have an 02 Vee, which had the lowest powered charging system of the bunch, so this would be of benefit to me, not sure what your output is.
 

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I believe keeping the oil level at maximum all the time will help keep the stator cool and lengthen it's life.

I have no proof and can't get any since I smashed my crystal ball.

I also believe reducing the load will shorten the life.
 
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