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Discussion Starter #1
So my battery is not charging.

Checked the battery and its good.
Checked and replaced the rectifier and the problem is still there.

Used a voltmeter to test the wires coming from the stator cover and they showed 0.04 and the manual says between 0.02 and 0.07 is OK so I was stuck with what it might be.

However, I pulled the stator anyway and not only is the gasket degraded but there is evidence of wire burning on the stator which you can see in the picture.

My question is this, is this burnt stator the cause of my charging issue? The resistance readings I'm getting seem to indicate that it's not the issue but those wires should not be burnt and it seems too obvious that it's the cause of my issue.

Anyone had a similar issue before??



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Looks like that stator ist toast. The resistance readings are not the issue. The problem is resistance of the 3 phases against ground (the metal parts of the stator). May not read bad when cold but most likely will be low resistance = a short circuit to ground and thus not enough power getting to the rectifier/ regulator. The burned epoxy insulation does not do its job any longer, thus the short circuit.
 

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The answer to your question is yes there have been many! Use the Google custom search box on the upper right side of of this website and you will find lots of people who have been through what you are experiencing.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Looks like that stator ist toast. The resistance readings are not the issue. The problem is resistance of the 3 phases against ground (the metal parts of the stator). May not read bad when cold but most likely will be low resistance = a short circuit to ground and thus not enough power getting to the rectifier/ regulator. The burned epoxy insulation does not do its job any longer, thus the short circuit.
This is what I thought but its good to hear a second voice saying it aside from the one in my head. The new stator arrives on Wednesday and I will be back on the bike Thursday if all goes well. I already miss it too much

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Looks like that stator ist toast. The resistance readings are not the issue. The problem is resistance of the 3 phases against ground (the metal parts of the stator). May not read bad when cold but most likely will be low resistance = a short circuit to ground and thus not enough power getting to the rectifier/ regulator. The burned epoxy insulation does not do its job any longer, thus the short circuit.
I agree. Mine just went. Short to ground. At least with LEDs everywhere it got me home as long as I kept it at 4,500 rpms and kept an eye on the voltage. This is the second one in about 63k miles. It was a -00. Hope the newer ones are better. After I get it running I'll replace the Moffset with a serial R/R.

Ordered the Stator from BikeBandit. Will get it this week. 10 days.

Fill in the info on your Strom. There was a recall for newer ones.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
So now the new stator is fitted and now it's all Plumbed in I'm not sure if it's right or not.


Using a voltmeter to the battery I am getting the following readings.

Ignition off = 11.80v

At idle = 11.85v

At 5000rpm = 12.50v

The manual says anything from 12-14 is OK but this still seems poor?

Thoughts?



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Instead of throwing parts at it, troubleshoot the charging system

Rather than seeing the countless "Dead Battery" and "My Bike Won't Start" threads over and over and over, I think it's time to put all the necessary battery and charging system testing information into a sticky thread. It may seem intimidating, but you can get through it by taking it in bite-sized chunks one step at a time. This guide will hopefully take some of the mystery out of it. (My shop specializes in Japanese sportbikes, so this will apply to quite a few bikes, but not all.)

You put your key in the ignition and turn it. Your bike won't start. You need to find out why. You first have to determine whether you have a low battery, a dead battery or some other issue. Loose or dirty battery terminal connections need to be fixed right away. Clean, tight connections are essential.

If your lights come on, the bike won't turn over and you hear a buzzing sound (the starter relay) when you hit the starter button, you have a low battery voltage condition. This situation calls for charging the battery properly and then finding out whether it will remain alive or not with a load test.

Sometimes, your bike will crank over without starting and gradually slow down until it's dead and buzzing. This situation also calls for charging the battery properly and then finding out whether it will remain alive or not by load testing.

If your lights don't come on and nothing happens when you press the starter button, you have a dead battery, a blown main fuse or some other issue like a loose battery cable. The solution here is to install a known good and fully charged battery, verify the basics (good connections) and try again.

Motorcycle charging systems are basically low-tech and require proper care and feeding in order to work properly. The engine produces electricity, the regulator/rectifier manages electricity and the battery stores electricity. The first thing to know is that bike batteries can go bad and die from just a little bit of neglect. Lack of use is the kiss of death. Using a bike daily generally keeps the battery charged up, as long as it's not being ridden in constant short-trip mode. If your bike sits parked and unused for periods of time, the best thing you can do is to keep your battery juiced and maintained with an automatic charger. This is your best plan for having your bike start when you need it to. An automatic maintenance charger is cheap when compared to the cost, hassle and downtime of replacing a dead battery and will pay for itself in more ways than one. Don't cheap out- if you have a bike, you should have the appropriate charger for it. Not all chargers have an auto function, so check before use. You can easily kill a battery by overcharging it with a constant output charger.

Your battery is tapped into bigtime in order to start the bike. Cranking it over draws a lot of amps, so the battery has to be in good condition. The charging system gradually replenishes the juice used in start-up. On most motorcycles, there is a 3 winding stator coil pack and rotary permanent magnet (rotor) on the end of the crankshaft that spins when the engine runs that produces AC electricity. This juice then proceeds through the stator harness to the regulator/rectifier. Several things happen here. The AC electricity is changed into DC electricity by what's called a diode bridge in the rectifier. This component "rectifies" AC output into usable DC output so the bike can run. The voltage regulator then decides just how much juice to send back to the battery for recharging purposes and how much is syphoned off and lost as heat through the cooling fins on the regulator/rectifier body. Note: The charging system only works and puts out decent power when the bike is revved up to the 3,000 to 4,000 rpm range and above. Engine speed matters. At idle, the system is basically running at a loss because the stator output is minimal.

If you have a dead battery and replace it without checking the system vitals, expect it to go dead again. This replacement may get you running again temporarily, but you really need to find out why your other battery died in the first place so you don't end up stuck someplace with a dead bike. Testing a charging system is fairly straightforward. Your battery needs to be fully charged in order to test the charging system. You'll need a multi-meter in order to pin things down. The first thing to check is your DC charging voltage at the battery terminals. Set the meter to 20 volts DC and attach the positive and negative leads to the battery. This will give you your basic battery charge condition. A fully charged battery will have a free voltage reading of 12.6 to 12.8 volts. Start the bike, allow it to warm up and rev it up to 3,000 to 4,000rpms. Look at the DC voltage at the battery. You want to see about 13.5 to 14.5 DC volts when the revs are up. If it's above or below this range, you need to perform further tests. Shut the bike off and hook up the battery charger while you get ready.

If your DC voltage reading at the battery is above the 14.5 volt range, your voltage regulator might be defective. Too much electricity will roast that battery. Replace the regulator/rectifier and retest.

If your DC voltage is below the 13.5 volt range, your stator AC output needs to be tested. Generally, there are 3 wires coming off of the stator that go to the regulator/rectifier. Locate the stator harness (generally coming out of the left side engine cover) and disconnect the harness from the regulator/rectifier. You'll have 3 wires inside the gang connector, A, B and C. Set your multi-meter to 100 volts AC and check the readings between A to B, B to C, and C to A when the bike is revved up to 4,000rpms. Each of these 3 results should be the same, generally in the 50 to 80 volts AC range. If you find one or more winding with a low or zero reading, your stator is burned up and needs to be replaced. This replacement may fix things with no further work, but I have seen defective stators take out regulator/rectifiers because of the erratic voltage outputs. Testing the rectifier calls for an ohm test of the diode bridge to see if there are any bad diodes present. You'll need the service manual for your bike to identify the appropriate wires to test.

A bad stator or regulator/rectifier can also take out a battery. A well maintained battery will typically last about 5 years or so. If the battery is ever discharged or neglected, this lifespan can be shortened by quite a bit.

When all is said and done, a final DC voltage test should be done to verify the repairs were successful and you're good to go. If you're still feeling a little lost, it's best to get help from someone who knows the testing process. This will go a long way to taking the mystery out of charging systems and getting you back on the road.
 

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Instead of throwing parts at it, troubleshoot the charging system

Rather than seeing the countless "Dead Battery" and "My Bike Won't Start" threads over and over and over, I think it's time to put all the necessary battery and charging system testing information into a sticky thread. It may seem intimidating, but you can get through it by taking it in bite-sized chunks one step at a time. This guide will hopefully take some of the mystery out of it. (My shop specializes in Japanese sportbikes, so this will apply to quite a few bikes, but not all.)

You put your key in the ignition and turn it. Your bike won't start. You need to find out why. You first have to determine whether you have a low battery, a dead battery or some other issue. Loose or dirty battery terminal connections need to be fixed right away. Clean, tight connections are essential.

If your lights come on, the bike won't turn over and you hear a buzzing sound (the starter relay) when you hit the starter button, you have a low battery voltage condition. This situation calls for charging the battery properly and then finding out whether it will remain alive or not with a load test.

Sometimes, your bike will crank over without starting and gradually slow down until it's dead and buzzing. This situation also calls for charging the battery properly and then finding out whether it will remain alive or not by load testing.

If your lights don't come on and nothing happens when you press the starter button, you have a dead battery, a blown main fuse or some other issue like a loose battery cable. The solution here is to install a known good and fully charged battery, verify the basics (good connections) and try again.

Motorcycle charging systems are basically low-tech and require proper care and feeding in order to work properly. The engine produces electricity, the regulator/rectifier manages electricity and the battery stores electricity. The first thing to know is that bike batteries can go bad and die from just a little bit of neglect. Lack of use is the kiss of death. Using a bike daily generally keeps the battery charged up, as long as it's not being ridden in constant short-trip mode. If your bike sits parked and unused for periods of time, the best thing you can do is to keep your battery juiced and maintained with an automatic charger. This is your best plan for having your bike start when you need it to. An automatic maintenance charger is cheap when compared to the cost, hassle and downtime of replacing a dead battery and will pay for itself in more ways than one. Don't cheap out- if you have a bike, you should have the appropriate charger for it. Not all chargers have an auto function, so check before use. You can easily kill a battery by overcharging it with a constant output charger.

Your battery is tapped into bigtime in order to start the bike. Cranking it over draws a lot of amps, so the battery has to be in good condition. The charging system gradually replenishes the juice used in start-up. On most motorcycles, there is a 3 winding stator coil pack and rotary permanent magnet (rotor) on the end of the crankshaft that spins when the engine runs that produces AC electricity. This juice then proceeds through the stator harness to the regulator/rectifier. Several things happen here. The AC electricity is changed into DC electricity by what's called a diode bridge in the rectifier. This component "rectifies" AC output into usable DC output so the bike can run. The voltage regulator then decides just how much juice to send back to the battery for recharging purposes and how much is syphoned off and lost as heat through the cooling fins on the regulator/rectifier body. Note: The charging system only works and puts out decent power when the bike is revved up to the 3,000 to 4,000 rpm range and above. Engine speed matters. At idle, the system is basically running at a loss because the stator output is minimal.

If you have a dead battery and replace it without checking the system vitals, expect it to go dead again. This replacement may get you running again temporarily, but you really need to find out why your other battery died in the first place so you don't end up stuck someplace with a dead bike. Testing a charging system is fairly straightforward. Your battery needs to be fully charged in order to test the charging system. You'll need a multi-meter in order to pin things down. The first thing to check is your DC charging voltage at the battery terminals. Set the meter to 20 volts DC and attach the positive and negative leads to the battery. This will give you your basic battery charge condition. A fully charged battery will have a free voltage reading of 12.6 to 12.8 volts. Start the bike, allow it to warm up and rev it up to 3,000 to 4,000rpms. Look at the DC voltage at the battery. You want to see about 13.5 to 14.5 DC volts when the revs are up. If it's above or below this range, you need to perform further tests. Shut the bike off and hook up the battery charger while you get ready.

If your DC voltage reading at the battery is above the 14.5 volt range, your voltage regulator might be defective. Too much electricity will roast that battery. Replace the regulator/rectifier and retest.

If your DC voltage is below the 13.5 volt range, your stator AC output needs to be tested. Generally, there are 3 wires coming off of the stator that go to the regulator/rectifier. Locate the stator harness (generally coming out of the left side engine cover) and disconnect the harness from the regulator/rectifier. You'll have 3 wires inside the gang connector, A, B and C. Set your multi-meter to 100 volts AC and check the readings between A to B, B to C, and C to A when the bike is revved up to 4,000rpms. Each of these 3 results should be the same, generally in the 50 to 80 volts AC range. If you find one or more winding with a low or zero reading, your stator is burned up and needs to be replaced. This replacement may fix things with no further work, but I have seen defective stators take out regulator/rectifiers because of the erratic voltage outputs. Testing the rectifier calls for an ohm test of the diode bridge to see if there are any bad diodes present. You'll need the service manual for your bike to identify the appropriate wires to test.

A bad stator or regulator/rectifier can also take out a battery. A well maintained battery will typically last about 5 years or so. If the battery is ever discharged or neglected, this lifespan can be shortened by quite a bit.

When all is said and done, a final DC voltage test should be done to verify the repairs were successful and you're good to go. If you're still feeling a little lost, it's best to get help from someone who knows the testing process. This will go a long way to taking the mystery out of charging systems and getting you back on the road.
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My battery reads 12.3 volts at rest, anything less is suspect. The new voltage readings are not consistent with a new stator. Here is a post from my stator experience.

Today I installed the new Electrosport stator. A comparison of them shows they are much alike.
DSC00364

The stator wires exit the housing through the rubber grommet and this is what keeps it from leaking oil. The replacement was slightly larger so I cut it down less than a sixteenth of an inch because I thought it might not seal. I don't know if that was a good idea, but it seems to be holding.

After unbolti ng the old one and installing the new one with a new gasket and nothing more I routed the wires and made the connections. It was difficult, but I was able to do it after about a half hour. The new connectors do not seem as secure so I will tape them. As with most of my electrical connections I now apply dielectric grease most of the time.

After taking care that most of the things I removed or loosened were now in place I connected the battery and checked the voltage. 12.4 at rest. When I started the bike and checked it showed 14.4 volts at any rpm. The new battery came today, but I am going to use the old one for a few days while I check for leaks and loose connections. So I am satisfied for now with the Electrosport and I have a voltmeter on the way.

Speaking of air boxes, I decided to check my K & N filter after 18000 miles of usage.
DSC00363

The inside of the uh, box, was clean. Clean as a whistle. I cleaned and re-oiled the filter, but it was probably ok.
I also changed the engine oil and filter. The spark plugs (regular) have 18000 miles and are going strong. Probably time to check the valve clearances again, but dang it I also have an FJR with 31,000 miles to maintain.

I will have to test ride the bike and then ride some more before I can claim success, but at least I was able to restore it without too much fuss.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
My battery reads 12.3 volts at rest, anything less is suspect. The new voltage readings are not consistent with a new stator. Here is a post from my stator experience.
Yeah the voltage I was getting on the earlier post was from a half charged battery as it turns out. I have riden the bike for about 100 miles, the battery is now fully charged and is charging as it should be. I'm getting 12.35 at rest and 13.5 at idle.

Problem solved.

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