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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am balancing my wheels after Cycle Gear installed new Shinko 705 tires. I use the traditional static balance with small weights. I have a 2009 650ABS.

Do you recommend doing the balance with or without the rear sprocket attached? I removed it for the balance but not sure of that is proper. I have not put the wheel back on the bike yet.
 

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Without. It’s a hassle to balance with it on.

A little physics comment here too. The sprocket is very close to the axle and center of rotation of your wheel. An imbalance near the axle is not nearly as important as an imbalance at the outer diameter of your wheel where the tire’s weight acts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Excellent, thank you. Another question I forgot to ask... Since the wheel is so wide, should the weights be spread out on both sides, or is placing the weights on a single side sufficient?
 

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Excellent, thank you. Another question I forgot to ask... Since the wheel is so wide, should the weights be spread out on both sides, or is placing the weights on a single side sufficient?
I split the weights between the left and the right. If my wheel needs more than 1.5 ounces, I break the tire bead, rotate the tire 180 degrees and try again. If it’s still way out of balance, I live with it and cross the tire of my buy again list.
 

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If I use more than 1 weight...I split them to both sides....but thats jus me.

Many years back...I did have a balance problem with a new tire...& in the process of determining the solution... The local shop contacted the tire distributor (Tucker Rocky) who in turn contacted the tire mfg (I think Bridgestone but not sure). The email response we got from the mfg detailed a common misconception that the dot on the new tire is to be aligned with the wheel valve stem.
Thats not the case. As per the mfg...the dot on the tire is simply a mark indicating the light spot. Most times...the valve stem is the heavy spot of the wheel...but not always. Sometimes the heavy spot is near the valve...sometimes it can be 45-90° from the stem...or even more! That was the case on that FJR front rim. Heavy spot was almost 180° from valve stem!!
After getting that info from the tire mfg..I began to check the balance of the wheel itself before mounting the tire. Only needs to be done once at the first tire change after bike purchase. Jus mark the rim inside for future changes.
Most times I need only 1-2 weight segments (10g). & a few times no weights were needed!
I do agree on the sprocket carrier question...install not needed due to much shorter distance from wheels centerline.

Newer tires from some mfgs like Michelin no longer have the light spot dots....mabe due to a change in the tire moulding process.

One xtra note... One of my past jobs years ago was as an aircraft mechanic of sorts. During those years I was responsible for installing de ice boots on propellors & then static balancing them. The weights had to be mounted near the props centerline on the hub so the balance process was slightly different.
But still very necessary!
 

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I am balancing my wheels after Cycle Gear installed new Shinko 705 tires. I use the traditional static balance with small weights. I have a 2009 650ABS.

Do you recommend doing the balance with or without the rear sprocket attached? I removed it for the balance but not sure of that is proper. I have not put the wheel back on the bike yet.
Are you checking for concentricity?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Are you checking for concentricity?
I believe you are asking if the wheel hub is in the true center. I can only assume it is. If that is not what you mean, I may need an explanation. Sorry!

I bought the bike with about 20,000 miles and the tires were ~12 years old. They still had tread and rode quite smooth but I felt it best to change them given the age (I know that is a whole different conversation). They were Anakee Adventures and I liked the feel. I was unable to locate the same tires but did find Shinko 705s at my local Cycle Gear. They mounted and balanced the tires but I can feel a very low (but constant) buzzing that was not there before. My wife sometimes rides on the back and she could definitely feel the vibration. I could also hear the tires on the road which is not something I experienced with the older Anakee tires. I decided I wanted to balance myself (if that was the issue) so I purchased a static balancer and weights from Rocky Mountain ATVMC.
 

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@TinMan88 may mean runout, both axial and lateral. If not I’m clueless too. Runout is just if the rim wobbles L to R, or seems to move up and down. Just spin the rim and use a pointer like a wood dowel held near the rim to check.

As for vibration, you are running a lower quality tire than what was on it previously. The tires you have use a more aggressive tread block also. I am not criticizing Shinko’s as many here like them.

I am running Anakee Adventures myself. The Shinko may not be a radial either.
 

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I believe you are asking if the wheel hub is in the true center. I can only assume it is. If that is not what you mean, I may need an explanation. Sorry!

I bought the bike with about 20,000 miles and the tires were ~12 years old. They still had tread and rode quite smooth but I felt it best to change them given the age (I know that is a whole different conversation). They were Anakee Adventures and I liked the feel. I was unable to locate the same tires but did find Shinko 705s at my local Cycle Gear. They mounted and balanced the tires but I can feel a very low (but constant) buzzing that was not there before. My wife sometimes rides on the back and she could definitely feel the vibration. I could also hear the tires on the road which is not something I experienced with the older Anakee tires. I decided I wanted to balance myself (if that was the issue) so I purchased a static balancer and weights from Rocky Mountain ATVMC.
Sure. If you wish to balance the rotating assembly complete you are being very thorough but given the sprocket sub-assembly is machined on center, it's contributions to balance would be inconsequential.
In your second entry you speak more to a buzz or vibration. You changed tires and noted the change afterward. In this you answered your own question. As the rubber tread blocks slam into the road surface they howl in protest. If you want knobbie tires on the street, you are going to get knobbie behavior in return. Out of balance wheel assembly will hop or shake at the frequency of rotation giving off a sound that will drive elephants crazy. Cheers!
 

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One small suggestion: Don't seat the tire bead until AFTER you get it balanced. That way, it's easier to rotate the tire in relation to the wheel if you need to adjust for a very out-of-balance tire.
 

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In my early Strom days, I would place all wheel weights on one side of wheel, assuming it didn’t matter. In those days , I noticed that, if I took my hands off the handlebar, while riding, the front wheel would “shimmy”, noticeably. Decided to equalize weights, side-to-side, and shimmy went away, mostly. Live and learn.
 
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Ride-on goop for me. No need to balance anything and may help with certain punctures. So far it has been the smoothest it's ever been with that stuff. You'll notice it for the first couple miles on a cold morning but it spreads out quick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for all the responses. What a great forum for assistance!

I static balanced both front and rear wheels and reinstalled them. There is still a slight hum / buzz at all speeds but it is less than before balancing. But more importantly, there is no shimmy or vibration that is problematic. I think the fact I replaced the Anakee Adventures with Shinko 705s without expecting any difference in 'feel' is where my problem lies. I am predominantly an off road rider and my dirt bikes use soft but knobby tires. I don't have a lot of road experience or what to expect but hopefully my V-Strom will take care of that. :)

Thanks again for all of the replies.
 

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Ride-on goop for me. No need to balance anything and may help with certain punctures. So far it has been the smoothest it's ever been with that stuff. You'll notice it for the first couple miles on a cold morning but it spreads out quick.
Ditto.



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One small suggestion: Don't seat the tire bead until AFTER you get it balanced. That way, it's easier to rotate the tire in relation to the wheel if you need to adjust for a very out-of-balance tire.
I would have to disagree with that. If the tire is NOT fully seated one is wasting their time trying to balance it. But, full disclosure: I have worked with balancing things more than I care to remember. I was a NVH specialist (noise-vibration-harshness) who trained professionals on how to cure vibration problems. I got spoiled having a lot of high dollar specialized computer driven machines to solve these problems. A motorcycle wheel seems pretty tame compared to some of the issue we had to deal with.
Moment arms: You can read the complex physics of these but in simple layman terms the further a weight is from the center of rotation the more it affects the balance.
Weight on on spot, both sides of the rim or on the spoke? Some bikes will have one weight attached to a spoke next to the rim. Most of these I have seen were chrome plated and on Harley type bikes. Some will split the weight and put half on either side of the rim. (not a bad idea...usually). On automotive applications we might put weight on the inside, outside or center of the rim. A high end balancer will let you program how you want to place the weight and then do its best to figure out what to use for your choice. On the wider tire of a car or truck you can have a problem with one side being heavier than the other and the weight needs to be put on the rim on one side only to counter that.
One big truck tires, due to that moment arm thing, we actually have glue on weights where we run the wheel assembly, mark every thing and then break the tire down and stick the lead weight on the INSIDE of the tire against the tread. This allows the weight to have more influence due to it being further away from the center of rotation. You need some "professional grade" machinery to do that sort of stuff.

How do you know your rim is in balance? Did you check it? I spent a lot of time diagnosing, and teaching classes to professionals how to diagnose, the odd ball vibration problems. I had the best gear available and all the resources to hand these problems. We were always able to resolve the issues but sometimes the problems were much bigger than just a tire or a rim.

My point is simply this....motorcycle tires are not very wide nor heavy. Don't over analyze balancing them. Also remember doing static balancing on a stand is more hope and prayer than science. There are a lot of dynamic forces that don't show up until the wheel is spinning and even more so when its spinning while being loaded. As I use to tell my students, "We can perfectly balance a square wheel, but will it ride smoothly?". And then there is "RFV", Radial Force Variation, where a wheel is round and in dynamic balance but vibrates under a load. Look it up....again, something that requires high end equipment to find and correct.

My approach is simple: But a high quality name brand tire. Mount it and seat it completely. Put it on a stand and spin it to insure the rim is straight and the tire runs true. Do a dynamic balance on it and go ride on it. You will most likely be fine. If you do have any bad vibration problems you likely have a tire issue. Break down the tire, move it 180 degrees on the rim and repeat the balancing. If there is still an issue, try another tire.
 
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I believe you are asking if the wheel hub is in the true center. I can only assume it is. If that is not what you mean, I may need an explanation. Sorry!

I bought the bike with about 20,000 miles and the tires were ~12 years old. They still had tread and rode quite smooth but I felt it best to change them given the age (I know that is a whole different conversation). They were Anakee Adventures and I liked the feel. I was unable to locate the same tires but did find Shinko 705s at my local Cycle Gear. They mounted and balanced the tires but I can feel a very low (but constant) buzzing that was not there before. My wife sometimes rides on the back and she could definitely feel the vibration. I could also hear the tires on the road which is not something I experienced with the older Anakee tires. I decided I wanted to balance myself (if that was the issue) so I purchased a static balancer and weights from Rocky Mountain ATVMC.
Just curious, did you mean to type that the tires were “12 years old”, or just ‘2’ years? I don’t think the Anakee Adventure has been around for 12 years. Not a big deal now that you’ve swapped them, just wanted to know. Better safe than sorry! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
That is a great question about the Anakee tires. You may be correct that they were not the "Adventure". I looked at photos of when I bought the bike and I see Michelin Anakee logo on each, but I do not see the word Adventure. I have the previous owner's records and they were installed in 2011. The date stamp on each tire was from year 2010.

When I went to replace the tire, I searched for the Michelin Anakee tire and the reviews for the "Adventure" were positive. I made the assumption that the older tires were the 'Adventure' tire, but obviously not if they were not made back in 2010. Good catch!
 
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