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I just had my sprockets replaced by a guy who knows what he's doing. He's been a mechanic on race bikes for years and is pretty well respected.

When I looked on this forum, I found that instructions for the sprocket replacement indicated that the clutch lever -must- be compressed and held while removing the slave portion over the sprocket cover.

I showed the instructions to the mechanic, and neither he nor I could figure out why the lever should be compressed. He guessed that perhaps it was a way of ensuring that no air gets into the system.

So, why do the instructions demand the clutch lever compression?

Well? I'm waiting...

:cool:

p.s. Aren't you impressed that I actually posted a legitimate question for a change?

I know -I- am...
 

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I was also a bit puzzled by that. I chose to trust my Haynes book that says "don't operate the clutch lever with the release cylinder removed". It also says that one should use cable ties around the piston and through the mounting holes to prevent the piston creeping out. This method worked perfectly for me..
 

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When I looked on this forum, I found that instructions for the sprocket replacement indicated that the clutch lever -must- be compressed and held while removing the slave portion over the sprocket cover.
Trust your mechanic and ignore the instructions here. Compressing the clutch lever when removing the slave is the first bad advice I've seen on this forum. I tried it against my own judgment, never again. If you enjoy bleeding you clutch when you shouldn't have to, then by all means compress the lever.
 

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p.s. Aren't you impressed that I actually posted a legitimate question for a change?

I know -I- am...
Well, I am as well, Janice. Did a Warner Brothers cartoon style double take.

But I don't know the answer to your question. . .
 

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When I looked on this forum, I found that instructions for the sprocket replacement indicated that the clutch lever -must- be compressed and held while removing the slave portion over the sprocket cover.

I showed the instructions to the mechanic, and neither he nor I could figure out why the lever should be compressed. He guessed that perhaps it was a way of ensuring that no air gets into the system.

So, why do the instructions demand the clutch lever compression?
Because the clutch slave cylinder is under spring pressure and with the lever not compressed, it will allow the spring to eventually push the piston all the way out. By compressing the lever, you close the system off and put it in a hydraulic lock so the spring can't push the piston out. Just release the lever before you attempt to put the slave cylinder back on the bike.

Trust your mechanic and ignore the instructions here. Compressing the clutch lever when removing the slave is the first bad advice I've seen on this forum. I tried it against my own judgment, never again. If you enjoy bleeding you clutch when you shouldn't have to, then by all means compress the lever.
One squeeze of the clutch lever will NOT make the piston pop out. Granted, if you squeeze 10 times or so, then yes, it will pop. But I don't think anyone on here has ever said that. As for bad advice, I guess you can thank the service manual cause that's where we learned it from. If it were me, I'd trust a mechanic that knows how to read a service manual and follow instructions. But that's just me.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Because the clutch slave cylinder is under spring pressure and with the lever not compressed, it will allow the spring to eventually push the piston all the way out. By compressing the lever, you close the system off and put it in a hydraulic lock so the spring can't push the piston out. Just release the lever before you attempt to put the slave cylinder back on the bike.
The mechanic didn't release the lever before putting everything back together again and it all works perfectly.

WTF?

Now I'm -really- confused.

:confused:
 

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The mechanic didn't release the lever before putting everything back together again and it all works perfectly.

WTF?
No worries, it's not going to hurt anything, it just makes it harder to re-assemble. Once you release the lever, things go back the way they were supposed to be. You may want to just double check the torque on the bolts for the slave cylinder though since they were also pushing against the pressure plate springs while he was tightening it down. But don't worry, there is no harm in leaving the lever compressed, it just makes it a little tougher to put it together.;)
 

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One squeeze of the clutch lever will NOT make the piston pop out. Granted, if you squeeze 10 times or so, then yes, it will pop. But I don't think anyone on here has ever said that. As for bad advice, I guess you can thank the service manual cause that's where we learned it from. If it were me, I'd trust a mechanic that knows how to read a service manual and follow instructions. But that's just me.
I never said it would make the piston pop out. If you actually read my post, you'd know that I DID do it as the instructions on this site suggest when I removed mine, but I won't be doing it that way next time. This isn't my first bike or first hydraulic clutch. This was, however, the first time I had to bleed the clutch as a part of doing this job.
 

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Just release the lever before you attempt to put the slave cylinder back on the bike.
BTW, that is not what the instructions here on Stromtrooper say:

http://www.stromtrooper.com/showthread.php?t=26282

Tools required:
· 5mm hex wrench or socket
· 4mm hex wrench or socket
· 8mm combination wrench
· 8mm socket and ratchet (1/4 or 3/8 drive take your pick)
· Kerosene and rags (optional)
Start by securing the clutch lever to the hand grip. Any method that keeps the lever pulled in will work. I used cable ties.

Once you have done this (DO NOT SKIP THIS STEP) locate the slave cylinder. It is held in place by two 5mm hex head bolts. Remove these bolts.

Remove the slave. Work it gently from side to side as you pull back. Be sure that you don’t force it up or down, as this might bend the push rod, and that would be bad.

Sometimes the rubber cup comes off with the slave, and sometimes it stays in the carrier

If It’s still in there just pluck it out. And remove the pushrod gently. Don’t damage the seal that goes through the case.




The sprocket cover is held in place with three (3) 8mm bolts. Two can be easily accessed using a ratchet and 8mm socket, but the one closest to the shift linkage will require the 8mm combo wrench and a s**tload of quarter turns.



Once you have the sprocket cover off you can locate the tube that protects the bolt in front of the chain.





Now would be a good time to clean all that chain goo and road crap out of there.

Replace the sprocket cover

Be sure to put the round peg back into the hole

Now when you are ready to re-install the slave, take the front bolt and put it through the slave and then slide the tube over it like this…

And start it by hand. Then start the second. Tighten them alternately insuring that the slave is installed evenly. Check that everything is tight and then cut the cable ties. You are done.
 

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I never said it would make the piston pop out. If you actually read my post, you'd know that I DID do it as the instructions on this site suggest when I removed mine, but I won't be doing it that way next time. This isn't my first bike or first hydraulic clutch. This was, however, the first time I had to bleed the clutch as a part of doing this job.
Why did you have to bleed the clutch? And how is this the fault of compressing a clutch lever?
 

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Yeah, I know. Funny how things get better when more time goes by and more people learn better ways to accomplish the same task. I take it you have a problem with this? If so, well.... tough.
Why the attitude? :rolleyes:

I'm all for finding better ways, I just don't happen to agree that this is one of them. You like it, great. Have at it.

As for why my clutch needed bleeding afterward, your guess is as good as mine. All I know is that there was a TON of air in the system that wasn't there before. So much that the system didn't function at all. I've removed and replaced hydraulic slave cylinders dozens of times on other bikes and have never had this happen. The only difference was on the Strom I tied the lever. You've had luck with it, great. I didn't.
 

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I always tie the piston in

but this is on other bikes my strom has never needed the clutch bleed, even when it was all to bits for the new sprocket and change.:rolleyes: you to need to change the fluid every few years just like brake fluid anyway so now is the perfect time, it is also a good time to go ahead and pop the piston and clean the cyl if the fluid is dark. a very small amount of moisture in the clutch fluid can contribute to clutch chatter, and the 1k if it is older did not have a boot that allows junk to get into the clutch cyl and make its action even worse. may as well clean wile your at it kind of thing.

By the way, if you are ever down to east Tn again I would really love to meet you in person I'll buy lunch and give you some killer secret roads..... Just because I love your posts, and I am interested in your business it looked like fun from your web site. (well for a industrial geek any way)
 

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As for why my clutch needed bleeding afterward, your guess is as good as mine. All I know is that there was a TON of air in the system that wasn't there before. So much that the system didn't function at all. I've removed and replaced hydraulic slave cylinders dozens of times on other bikes and have never had this happen. The only difference was on the Strom I tied the lever. You've had luck with it, great. I didn't.
Then I wouldn't exactly call it bad advice seeing as pulling in a clutch lever has zero do to with it. It is a closed system and pulling in the lever only does the same thing it would normally do if it were installed on the bike. It only moves a set amount of fluid whether it's on the bike or resting in your hand.

I guess my beef is calling it bad advice when it's really not. Sorry you had trouble with yours, but no one else on this forum has so I highly doubt that it is bad advice. My guess is that someone before you didn't bleed your clutch properly and there were air bubbles trapped in the slave cylinder. When you pulled it off to change the sprocket, it probably moved them around and thus the air in the lines. But the act of pulling in a lever will NOT introduce air into the system, period. It's just physically impossible.

But as far as ignore the forum, I think you are correct. Ignore the one guy that for some strange reason had a problem and go with the couple thousand that haven't. Yeah, that sounds about right.;)
 
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