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I've ridden 16k miles in my first two years on the road. I started on a KLR like many here. I guess thats where I learned my fear of a stiff crosswind. I admit it, it gives me the willies. Like steep downhill on gravel and compounded interest. Coupled with a recent (not wind related) low side, I now know just how hard the pavement is. I guess life is a series of getting over it.

So, let me stop there with the philosophy (too much Stella?). Which would help the most, springs or brace, by adding a little stability and allot of placebo? I may eventually do both, but I have a birthday coming up and the wife just asked.

Is it true that the fork brace can re leave some of the cupping on the front tire? Yes, I religiously check tire pressure to manufacturers specifications. Thank you for your responses.
 

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If you have to choose between the two options, go for the fork brace first. It makes a significant difference in the front-end stability.
 

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To tell you the truth, I'd plan on doing both. Sonic, I understand, manufactures a great replacement set of springs, and their website is helpful on deciding what rate you need. Figure the Strom's weight at 485lbs wet. I put a fork brace on my Wee, and it made a difference in stability, particularly when the bike's loaded up for touring. I'll do a set of Sonic springs this winter.
 

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I really would recommend you do both. If I could only choose one at a time, I would do the SonicSprings first.

Cheers!
 

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I'd install the fork brace first.

Only because it's really easy to do.
 

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If you haven't lowered the triple tree on the fork tube yet, I'd do that and do the springs. If you have lowered the trees, but still find the bike unstable, I'd do the fork brace instead.
 

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If you have to choose between the two options, go for the fork brace first. It makes a significant difference in the front-end stability.
What he said. Can't say about springs without knowing how much junk in the trunk.
 

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What Kinda Bike Is That?
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I would do both. If you purchase a Superbrace, it will probably cost you around $150. If you do the springs, (I like the Sonics), that will cost you about $100. Together, you will spend less then $300 on what I consider a major performance upgrade to your bike. This performance enhancement translate to increased safety and confidence in handling the bike.

The installation of the Superbrace will take you about 15 to 20 mins. The springs will take you a little longer. There are several threads here that explain how to do complete the latter task. I wrote one with included pictures when I replaced my springs in late Winter.

It's your birthday, go for both!

Barry B.
 

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I installed the fork brace and was suprised at the difference in a cross wind. I had removed my C Bailey wind screen because of instability and after installing the fork brace I put it back on and am very pleased with the results.
 

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Spring's or Fork Brace?

Its 'NOT' ether or. Its 'BOTH'! Get them both! Do not put off spending. They are only going to go up in price.
 

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I have a murphs fork brace. I hated the wobble @ high speed and weird feeling while turning over bumps w/ my stock 650. I also was VERY sceptical that a mere connection brace would do anything but be wasted $. After all, the forks are connected to the wheel. It actually worked and I was pleasantly surprised. I can't imagine bothering w/ springs but as time passes, who knows.
 

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I'd install the fork brace first.

Only because it's really easy to do.
+1.

I'd do both eventually, but I'd start with the fork brace because it's literally a ten-minute job to install and it makes a much bigger difference that you think it would.
 

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It's easy for me to understand the benefits of the fork brace, and I've already decided to get one. Being that I never ride off road, what benefits can I expect to get from the Sonics springs?
 

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Love my SuperBrace. Like the others said it's real easy to install, especially if you have a center stand. Made a huge difference in the twist and on windy days. Best description I have is that the bike feels crisper.
 

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It's easy for me to understand the benefits of the fork brace, and I've already decided to get one. Being that I never ride off road, what benefits can I expect to get from the Sonics springs?

Youll never ride a stock bike happily, ever again, if you take the plunge and get your bike sprung to your weight. It will spoil you. It will make the bike respond much better and it will feel more planted, more secure throughout your turn. And that will inspire confidence. Smaller bumps and road dips will be better absorbed. It is simply something that has to be felt to be fully understood. I feel its MORE important on the road then it is for the dirt. But then again, I dont have any dirt experience to speak of.
On the BANG FOR THE BUCK scale, suspension is near the top of that list.

The reason the fork brace works, is because it reduces flex in the forks. Bikes like these have alot of fork travel to work off road, and because of that, they are lanky. Theres alot more flex in those fork tubes then you may think. The super brace greatly reduces that and allows for a tighter feel out front. A good example is to look at the triple trees and shorter forks of the super bikes. Short, thick forks with limited travel and widely spaced, beefy triple clamps.

Ride safe!
 

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heres a thought, buy the fork brace for $150 and respring your forks for free (almost). Lift the front off the ground, back your preload all the way off, take a wrench and loosen, not remove, the fork caps. You'll probably have to remove the handlebars to pull the caps all teh way off.
-carefully remove the caps, they are spring loaded
-reach inside the fork and pull out the spacer and washer
-pull out the spring
-take a hacksaw or dremel tool or cutoff wheel and cut approx 2 or 3 inches(dont cut off more than 3 1/4" ) off the spring make sure you cut the exact amount from each spring (stock springs are progressive rate, one end the coils is tighter together than the other, cut from the tight end)
-heat the last coil with a propane torch just enough that you can bend it flat, the goal is to make it look like the stock end, pressing down on concrete floor works pretty good, try not to overheat the spring, let it cool naturally, hot steel into cold water can make it brittle
-grind or file it flat (dosent have to be perfect)
-take a piece of pvc pipe (1" dia I think) and make a spacer equal to the length of coil you removed
-reinstall the spring, pvc spacer, washer, steel spacer in that order
-reinstall for caps, tighten, handlebars, etc and youre done
-if you dont like the results, then go spend $100 on new springs

How it works: preload does not change the rate, but if you shorten the spring you reduce the number of active coils that twist. Think of it this way,, use a 3 foot extension on a ratchet and see how much it twists when you pull on the wrench, now use a 3" extension and pull just as hard, not quite as much twist. a spring is just a long rod that twists as the spring is compressed, shorten the rod and its harder to twist. so, shorten the spring, shorten the rod. You'll notice that some aftermarket springs are much shorter than the stock one, makes you wonder why you spent $100
It works great, reduces nose dive and makes the bike feel more planted. While youre at it you can change your oil, change oil height, etc. Im just covering the spring part
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