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Discussion Starter #1
I have been searching the forum trying to see if this has already been covered, but I can't find anything. Lots of threads on fuel economy but nothing specific to tires.
So here I am. I am curious if you have changed from a dual sport tire to a sport touring tire, has it affected your fuel economy? Also, what tire pressures have you run and what affect, if any, has it had on fuel economy?
I am asking because I have been averaging 33-34mpg with my K2, with Shinko 705 tires, no power commander and 16/43 gearing. I know the 16/43 has a negative affect on fuel economy and will be swapping the 17t front back in soon. I also have a 1620 Pelican case on the back, which may have a negative effect. My riding style is what I would describe as spirited, shifting around 5k rpm, but I maintain about 70-75mph on the highway in 70/30 highway/city driving. Bike runs fine but I will be swapping in a k&n and iridium plugs soon as well.
 

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I doubt if you will see much difference with your fuel and tires. Air pressure will have some effect, but by far the biggest effect is wind resistance. Side cases, top box, those will definitely impact your fuel economy.
 
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Don't be sure going up on the front sprocket will save you fuel.

I had the opposite happen to me on my Wee.

I dropped a tooth and my average fuel usage dropped too.
 

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I'm a bit of a hypermiler, and I agree changing to 16/43 cost me mileage. Substantial mileage.
Roughly a 4mpg decrease on my k6
But unless the tire tread change is drastic, I don't see it causing much MPG change.
 

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I think it is going to be up to you to tell us.
Try to do a relatively "controlled" mileage test before you make the change(s) and then try to repeat it afterwards.
If you wanted to get really anal - it would be 4 tests original / tires / sprocket / air filter. The only problem might be getting trolled for not having a life ;-)
 
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If you record your mileage over many many tanks of fuel you will realize that your normal mileage changes a lot from from tank to tank. It's pretty much impossible to discern a mileage change of a few MPG. When someone says they see a 3 or 4 mpg change from changing a windshield or adding sidecases you will realize that they really don't have the information to support that. Speed (more precisely Airspeed)and temperatures (lower is worse) make the biggest overall difference I can see over about 400,000+ km 250,000 miles of Strom Riding.

I am sure that if there was a difference in the tires it would be no more than a few MPG if they had similar tire pressures and just about impossible to tell.

..Tom
 

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Tires wont effect mileage much. Bikes are so dirty aerodynamically speaking that wind direction would effect your mileage more from day to day. My '06 Vee gets about 39-42. I think you might need some adjusting. TB sync, Secondaries, something.
 
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If you want to save on gas slow down. A motorcyclist has the aero of a large empty box.

Over 60 mph your economy will drop drastically. I can almost guarantee that shifting at 5-6,000rpm, avoiding full throttle and SLOWING to no more that 55mph will increase your mpg most noticeably.

If you don't want to ride like that fine - but that high speed motorway riding is killing your fuel economy. The different tyre should make no difference to fuel economy but as you spend 70% of your time at 70/75mph back to 17 gearing should have some affect..
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the replies and advice everyone. The consensus seems to be that changing tires either will not have an affect or will not have an appreciable affect. I had thought that lower rolling resistance might have an impact. As I only need a rear tire right now, I will probably just get another Shinko 705 and when the current set runs out will try sport tourers.
As NVDucati suggested, I will be performing several long term tests and will post my results on here. The first will be with plugs and filter, next will be with the sprocket change, followed by a smaller givi trunk and finally, eventually, different tires. I feel like I have a pretty good baseline as I check my mileage (corrected and verified using gps and law enforcement speed signs) vs fuel consumed and the results don't really seem to waver much more than 1mpg. This is probably also due to me riding the same commute all the time and not getting much varied weekend riding these days. ? As for Brockie's suggestion to slow down, the peril of riding at 55mph on a 70mph highway (where people regularly drive 80mph) in Florida is not worth the mileage gain. I am sure you are correct, as I have noticed an increase in mileage on weekend rides that are more backroads than interstates. I will also look into dialing in the throttle bodies and secondaries.
 

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Changing from smoother-rolling tires to full knobbies on my KLR650 does have a noticeable but minor effect on power available at highway speeds (takes more throttle to maintain 80mph) and on mileage.

On the range of tires normally used on the DL, there's not much difference in rolling resistance.

It is common to notice a difference in rolling resistance between worn tires and new tires -- just pushing the bike around in the garage you can immediately tell a difference when you install new rubber. I suspect this plus a dose of the placebo effect might affect the anecdotal differences.
 
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I wouldn't worry so much about the fuel economy. If you are running a TKC-80 knobby type tires on pavement those are going to where quickly and be a much greater expense then the lost fuel economy. You should run Kendas.
 

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..
If you are running a TKC-80 knobby type tires on pavement those are going to where quickly ...
I give up: to **where** are they going quickly? :)

..Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Changing from smoother-rolling tires to full knobbies on my KLR650 does have a noticeable but minor effect on power available at highway speeds (takes more throttle to maintain 80mph) and on mileage.

On the range of tires normally used on the DL, there's not much difference in rolling resistance.

It is common to notice a difference in rolling resistance between worn tires and new tires -- just pushing the bike around in the garage you can immediately tell a difference when you install new rubber. I suspect this plus a dose of the placebo effect might affect the anecdotal differences.
All that makes sense. I think after the comments here I will stick with the Shinko 705 until my front tire is ready to change and then I will try a more street oriented tire...unless I happen to go for a leftover 2014 deal. They seem to be all over the place and the suspension upgrade would be nice. Thank you everyone for your thoughts and advice.
 

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I see a lot of forums about gas mileage. Why do people care about this topic so much? Is it because they want to travel longer without stopping (seems painful to ride that long)? Or is it a money issue (how much could you possibly be saving)?
I don't get it. I have never cared one bit about gas mileage.. Maybe I am missing something.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I see a lot of forums about gas mileage. Why do people care about this topic so much? Is it because they want to travel longer without stopping (seems painful to ride that long)? Or is it a money issue (how much could you possibly be saving)?
I don't get it. I have never cared one bit about gas mileage.. Maybe I am missing something.
I can't speak for everyone but I think for myself it's because I like to tinker. I like to tweak things a little here or there and make whatever machine I am working with at the time the best it can be. Mileage is a measureable metric, just like horsepower, torque, etc. If you are happy with it, that's fine, but for a lot of us, especially those of us on the forums, we like to ask questions and find the most definitive answers possible. I would also venture to say that a lot of stromtroopers are probably interested in value, or they might have chosen a more costly machine with more features.
 

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I see a lot of forums about gas mileage. Why do people care about this topic so much? Is it because they want to travel longer without stopping (seems painful to ride that long)? Or is it a money issue (how much could you possibly be saving)?
I don't get it. I have never cared one bit about gas mileage.. Maybe I am missing something.
Some people (me included) do it because they just like knowing and learning things.

Others (me included) like playing with numbers and making graphs.

Some (me included) do it so that they know on a day where it is well below freezing that the range of their 2015 DL1000 (and their previous Stroms) is about 15 to 20% worse so they might not have enough fuel to make their regular fuel stop and it is a long walk in the cold so better stop earlier.

As to this question:

Or is it a money issue...
If by money issue you mean that someone is worried they can't afford it I suppose there are people that simply can't afford it. I suspect for many others they enjoy spending their money wisely and simply burning money for fuel when they aren't getting extra enjoyment from it might not feel like a wise expenditure. Perhaps they would rather spend the money elsewhere. (Maybe they have lots of money because they do spend it wisely?)

...(how much could you possibly be saving)?
On my 2006 DL650 I "Saved" $8,435.03 (Canadian $) over 202,389 km/125759 miles.
On my 2012 DL650 I "Saved" $7,081.11 (Canadian $) over 139,538 km/86,714 miles.
On my 2015 DL1000 I have "saved" $1,731.62 (Canadian $) over 70,670 km/43,912 miles.


Details:
On my 2006 DL650 over 202,389 km or 125759 miles I spent $10,998.76 (Canadian $) If I did the same distance on my 2002 VW GTI VR6 24V, which ran on Super gas, I projected I would have spent $19,424.47 (Canadian $) which means I would have saved $8,435.03 (Canadian $) using the bike. (BTW that is more than I paid for the bike.) This assumed my GTI got 8l/100 km average (which is optimistic, that premium cost $.15 more than regular per liter, and if I drove the same distance on the GTI (Which I wouldn't have.)

Similar Calculations for the 2012 DL650 although part way through it's life I got a newer GTI that gets a bit better mileage. The DL1000 uses the more expensive Premium gas and doesn't get as good mileage so the savings are much less.

BTW I totally understand that tires, cost of gear, maintenance and insurance make a big dent to any real savings, but I enjoy playing with the numbers.

..Tom
 

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I calculate fuel mileage with each fill up. I use the info to think back on my riding with that tankful. It will invariably reflect how I was riding (speed, aggressiveness) and the time of the year (winter vs. summer blend fuel) as well as the altitude I was riding in. If it all makes sense I know that all is well. If not, I try to figure out and account for the disparity. I've been doing this for decades and it's fun. It keeps me in touch with what is going on with my machine and adds to "rider involvement".
 
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