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I have an 07 DL650 with 51000km on it an no problems until now. When I twist the throtle fast ,the speedometer jumps around like as if it is getting grounded. Has anyone experienced this before? What should I look into? I looked at some posts but couldn't find anything on this.

Thanks PETE
 

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Not too long ago there was a thread on this subject. Good luck trying to find it. Now to your problem. The cable may need some lube. This post is edited to keep you from looking for a cable to lube since there isn't one. It is an electrical speedometer not a mechanical speedometer. Thank you Black Lab for this information.
 

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What Kinda Bike Is That?
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Not too long ago there was a thread on this subject. Good luck trying to find it. Now to your problem. The cable may need some lube.
The speedometer cable is not mechanical. It is electrical. It needs no lubrication.

The issue is electrical.
 

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sounds like a short somewhere along the sender cable or somewhere further up stream?

the speedo hall effect sensor should send a clear 8 "on" signal (use a test light) per front wheel revolution - sorry u have to look at the schematics to see which wire - i cant remember.

i would check along the big connector on the left of fairing and to connector behind radiator shroud - any shorts?
 

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I should have done a bit of research before I flapped my trap.
It's okay.

I once thought it was mechanical too.

Then someone corrected me about that fact.

I figured I would pass the experience on.

Feels good, doesn't it?

(It didn't to me either!)
 

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Had to get my speedo fixed - same wacky needle behavior. Cheap sender part usually...
 

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Simple/Cheap Wee-Strom Speedometer Sender Fix

Standard disclaimer: Unless otherwise explicitly stated, the following information represents nothing more than my personal experience/opinion and should not be taken as anything more than that. In other words, don't underestimate my stupidity.

I have a 2006 Wee-Strom. At the mid 40k mile mark, the speedometer needle first began to jump and bob erratically and shortly thereafter ceased to function. The odometer stopped working at the same time.

Before explaining the fix, a brief description of the speedometer sender unit on the 2006 and similar Wee-Stroms: The unit consists of a cylindrical magnet with a cross-shaped plastic piece attached. A picture of the piece is attached to this post. The magnet/cross-shaped piece fits over a steel cylinder inside the speedometer sender housing and is allowed to spin freely (the contact surface between the magnet and steel cylinder is greased). The entire speedometer sender unit assembly is located on the left hand side (left hand as you sit on the bike - clutch lever side) of the front wheel and has a wire leading from it up the front shock and into the wiring harness. When the front wheel is turning, the cross-shaped plastic piece meshes with four raised tabs machined into the surface of the aluminum wheel, causing the cross-shaped plastic/cylindrical magnet piece to rotate with the wheel while the speedometer sender housing remains stationary. Through the magic of electromagnetics the spinning of the cylindrical magnet is converted into an electrical signal within the sender unit and is transmitted from the unit via wire.

Back to my specific case: Upon examining the speedometer sender unit, I found two issues: 1) the glue/epoxy/press-fit/magic spell joining the cylindrical magnet to the cross-shaped plastic piece had failed, so the magnet no longer spun when the cross-shaped piece spun; and 2) the grease inside the sender unit was contaminated by dirt and no longer provided good lubrication. I speculate that issue #2 probably occurred first, putting additional stress on the cross-shaped plastic piece/magnet assembly until the connection between the two pieces failed.

My fix for issue #1 was to clean both the crossed-shaped plastic piece and cylindrical magnet very thoroughly, carefully score the mating surfaces of both pieces with a sharp steel point, rejoin them with JB Weld brand epoxy putty (I'm not pitching that product, just stating what I used), and allow the epoxy to cure before reassembly and testing. My fix for issue #2 was to remove all the contaminated grease from inside the sender unit (I used kerosene) and apply a liberal amount of fresh Suzuki brand moly grease to the contact surfaces and dust seal when reassembling (in hindsight, it may have been better to apply a heavier grease to the dust seal surface, such as bearing grease, as that may do a better job of keeping dirt/dust and water out - however, I did deliberately use the lighter moly grease on the contact surfaces, as I thought a lighter grease would put less stress on my epoxy fix).

The fix worked - both the speedometer and odometer have been functioning normally for several hundred miles.

Final thoughts: This fix is worth investigating if you might be experiencing speedometer sender unit issues, as the fix is not complex and is less expensive than buying new parts. Also, in the spirit of the logic that moving parts tend to be the ones that break, the failure I experienced may be a fairly common failure type. Lastly, if you are super hardcore about preventative maintence, periodic inspection and cleaning/greasing when necesary of the speedometer sender unit might be a good idea when you have the front wheel off for tire changes or other reasons.
 

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Thank you for your post @thedarren!

I had a similar experience this week with my speedo needle jumping around on my 2007 Suzuki Vstrom DL 650A with ~80k miles.
I hated not having any idea what speed I was going, especially while passing everybody else (sorry officer).

I took things apart today and the axle grease I had used as a lubricant in the past looked in pretty good shape.
However, after cleaning everything up, the "crossed-shaped plastic piece and cylindrical magnet" were able to slip when sufficient torque pressure was applied.

I wasn't quite as committed as you to use JB Weld on it :) , but I did clean everything up with brake cleaner and used something a little less permanent, Red Thread Lock.
As for lubrication of the parts before reassembly, I went with silicone spray - very light, perhaps too light but time will tell.

I buttoned everything back up and went for a test drive.
Speedo was good up to my personal limit of 100mph :)

Hope this helps others enjoying to wonders of this great bike in its later years!

Ray Thill
Antelope, CA
 
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