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Discussion Starter #41
Thanks for all the comments, links and encouragement, since I started this thread I've been out practicing and riding multiple times with no drops

Mi rides are usually on 2 lane curvy roads and are fun, about 250 to 400kms round trip

Practice is on an empty street , quite wide with zero traffic as it is the end of a street with no houses
 

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Please don't forget to enjoy the sport. Yes work on your skills at times and keep the skills honed. But please enjoy the ride and don't make it all work. Sometimes you should get away from everyone and ride your ride and feel the wind. Our we will lose you and that would be one less wave that I get to do on my rides.
 

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Are you familiar with the concept of 'Countersteering'? It's one of the riding techniques you will use every time you ride, and one that will give you the control you desire. There are many videos on YouTube, but essentially, it's where you 'push forward' the grip on the handlebar in the direction (forward) you wish to turn. If you wish to turn right, push the right grip forward. If you wish to turn left, push the left grip forward. The technique works because you are using the natural gyroscopic forces to make the motorcycle turn - but this technique only works above walking/slow speed. At slow speed where the gyroscopic forces are much less, the effect is far less.

Countersteering has saved me from a few situations where you feel you can't quite make a corner because you entered the curve a little too fast. Rather than activate the brakes, countersteering gives you the active control you need to make it thru the corner if you're going a bit too fast. Try it out in a car park - go straight and gently push on the right grip, while relaxing your left grip a little - guess what happens - the bike turns! Once you get good at it, you can ride around making easy turns using only one hand - which further illustrates the effect.
 

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To prevent drops, a few tips
  • Stop with Left leg down, and keep right foot on brake pedal, then you will always be able to reach the ground if your tire happens to stop on a crest in the road. This also covers for roads that camber (slope down) to the right.
  • One foot down also works best when starting on an uphill slope, since you can keep right brake pressed.
  • It also compensates for a bike that is slightly too tall for you.
  • There is no experience like miles. Owning a bike for 10 years and only riding 5000 miles/year means your learning curve will be way longer. Get out there and ride.
  • Every time you drop the bike, you learn a little more, eventually you never drop it again (or very rarely). Again, putting in the miles makes all the difference.
  • Muscle memory takes years to master, but everyone can do it with enough practice. Riding is too much fun to quit because of a few drops, you just need to put on more miles.
 

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Are you familiar with the concept of 'Countersteering'? It's one of the riding techniques you will use every time you ride, and one that will give you the control you desire. There are many videos on YouTube, but essentially, it's where you 'push forward' the grip on the handlebar in the direction (forward) you wish to turn. If you wish to turn right, push the right grip forward. If you wish to turn left, push the left grip forward. The technique works because you are using the natural gyroscopic forces to make the motorcycle turn - but this technique only works above walking/slow speed. At slow speed where the gyroscopic forces are much less, the effect is far less.

Countersteering has saved me from a few situations where you feel you can't quite make a corner because you entered the curve a little too fast. Rather than activate the brakes, countersteering gives you the active control you need to make it thru the corner if you're going a bit too fast. Try it out in a car park - go straight and gently push on the right grip, while relaxing your left grip a little - guess what happens - the bike turns! Once you get good at it, you can ride around making easy turns using only one hand - which further illustrates the effect.
THANK YOU!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I tell everybody this. It IS a lifesaver!
 

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I did not read every reply, if I repeat, please ignore.

At our school we taught new riders to never cover the front brake lever so it was a conscious effort to stick some fingers out and pull it. Again, this was for new riders.

If you could find something like a Yamaha 250 to learn the slow ride it will transfer to the Suzuki almost seamlessly.

Videos are great but there is nothing like an instructor seeing your every move and correcting you in real time.

How does the Suzuki fit you? I have been riding since the early 1960s, after all these years I still make the bike fit me, not me fit the bike. Bar risers, pegs lowered, whatever it takes to make the bike fit me.

And as Kenny Sr. always said, "Unless your name is Rossi, put those damn feet on the pegs."
 

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Discussion Starter #48 (Edited)
Thanks !

Yes I'm familiar with countersteering and as mentioned use it at normal riding speeds to control the turns. Thankfully my drops have been at walking pace and while stopping or starting, all due to my mistakes for not fully mastering the clutch or grabbing the front brake to hard for the surface I'm on

This past weekend we had another day long ride, 6 of us a few bmw and a couple of vstroms, no drops at low speed,
There was a section about 5kms of loose large gravel - just remembered to keep my head pointing where I wanted to go, allowed the steering to move with the surface and be smooth, a bit scary but it went well.
Another portion of the ride I ran into loose gravel while turning, the motorcycle fish tailed , but I kept looking where I wanted to go , and did not used the brakes, it all happened in an instant and the wheels stayed on the pavement.
 
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