StromTrooper banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
After having my Buffalo Panniers for a couple of years, it was time to try and make them quick release and stop the wear on my bikes paint work. So the solution I've come up with was to but a Givi mounting rack and make up my own quick release system that would work with it. I hope someone find my little step by step guide of use.....

1) Using some cardboard trace around the panniers. Transfer this then onto some 10mm exterior ply. This will be the fixing plate between the Givi Rack and the panniers. It's worth taking a little time to get the ply to fit snuggly inside the panniers.


2) I then made up some fixing brackets to go on to the lower points of the Givi rack, these I made from some 16mm flat bar and are about 150mm long. A 10mm hole drilled in then opened up the end with a Dremel cutter.


3) Now you've got the lower brackets position the plate on the bike and decide when their going to go, mark the holes and drill. Don't forget to copy them on to the other ply plate. I then used the hammer in inserts to bolt the plate and mounting brackets together.
Hammer in inserts.


4) Then I had to find a way of making the panniers 'quick release'. The solution I found was to remove the Givi lock system.

and making up a little bracket that would pass from the Givi rack through the pannies to the inside.

Bracket fitted to the Givi Rack


5) After that I used contact glue to fix the ply plates to the inside of the panniers. Then I opened the holes for the brackets and quick release point with a hot soldering iron, this worked well on my panniers as the fabric melts and does not fray. The lower brackets sandwich the pannier between it and the ply plate. All metal work was sprayed up matt black to match the Givi rack.


6) To hold the pannier in place I found some spring lock pins like the once used on agricultural tractors. I usually lock the zips on my panniers when I use them, so I didn't see the need to to lock the panniers to the bike, but with system you could easily put a padlock on instead of the spring pin.


I'll see how the work out this week, but I'm pretty happy with them. They certainly take off the bike quicker than using the velcro straps and are alot more secure. I'd imagine this idea could be used on different makes of panniers. I'll post some more photos of the finished panniers on the bike later when the I've got the bike out.

I hope this has sparked a few ideas and is of use to other people. I've not tested these yet but I'll let you know how they work out. If any one has any comments please feel free.....

Cheers,

Chris......
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,157 Posts
I'd suggest putting a second piece of drilled out plate on the other side [inside of the bag] where the inserts sharp points engage the plywood. Would help spread the load to a wider section of plywood, instead of just those two points taking all the load [and giggling]. I could see the inserts ripping out of the plywood.

Clever dea, nevertheless - well done!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the comment 'jokermtb' I see what your saying. I've got a run out to do this week with all my tools in the panniers, so I'll see how that goes and if there is any movement on the inserts. If so I'll do as you suggest. May be I'll make up some lengths of bar and sandwich the ply between that and the mounting brackets.....
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top