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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Before I begin, a simple request: This topic is for people who are interested in learning more about peer-to-peer (P2P) bike rental. It's accepted there are those who "could never possibly consider such a ludicrous idea", for whom "the risks aren't worth the benefits", who believe "my Baby shall only be touched by my hands and those of God". This topic isn't for the latter. If you are one of those who disagrees with P2P rental, I respectfully ask you to start your own topic.

BACKGROUND:
I was once a person that would not let anyone ride my motorcycle. I wanted to keep my motorcycle as pristine as possible, and one of the ways I could help ensure that was to be the only one riding it. And, if something did happen (which it did), I was going to be the one making the repairs and getting it back on the road. But a few years ago I started changing (perhaps evolving?) my thinking to more of a 'things are just things' attitude. I think I'm happier for doing so.

So when the concept of P2P bike rental first became a thing, I saw it is a good test of my newer mindset. I listed my 2012 DL650 on two sites in quick succession and waited. And waited. And waited. And then I got my first rental.

I feel bad for that first renter, because I quizzed him mercilessly before agreeing to the rental (Point #1: The sites allow you to communicate with a potential renter before agreeing to the rental). I was nervous as H when I handed the keys over, and couldn't even watch him ride away for fear I'd see something that would cause me to second-guess my decision over the next 24 hours. Which I did anyways.

But the bike came back fine, and the renter was happy. So happy, in fact, he rented it again a few months later.

That first year, I think I only had 3 rentals. The next year, I had maybe 6-7. This season so far, I already have 5 reservations, and the bike is out on a 5-day rental right now.

For me, the risk IS worth the reward, as all my rental income goes into a 'Bike Fund' that I can draw off of for needed repairs, new gear (splurged on a new Klim riding jacket this year), and, hopefully in 1-2 years, fund the cash purchase of a new bike.

Here is information, tips and techniques I've discovered based on my experiences with P2P rental. I'm no expert, just a user that's learned a few things about a relatively new concept in rentals.

THE PLAYERS:
I'm aware of 3 companies currently offering P2P motorcycle rental at this time:
Twisted Road (TR)
I believe they were the first.

Riders Share (RS)
The one I currently get most of my rentals from.

EagleShare (ES)
An off-shoot of the established bike rental company EagleRider, been around for about a year.

My bike is listed on all 3, at the same daily rate.

INSURANCE:
The first question usually asked by someone inquiring about this is about insurance. Each company has its own way of handling it, but here's the short version. While the bike is out on a rental, it's covered by the company's property damage insurance. The amounts vary, but it's around $10,000-$25,000 in damages. All companies offer liability coverage to some extent. Their offers seem to improve every time I look; the last time I did I believe it was TR that included the state-mandated minimum liability coverage as part of the rental, but the bike owner can pay a little extra for a higher amount of coverage. I know ES offers up to $1,000,000 in liability coverage for "qualified" owners. If you're new to this, I recommend researching and fully understanding the insurance offerings of each company before listing your bike.

It's also a good idea to check with your own insurance company to make sure it will cover you if the bike is out on a rental. Some insurance companies have refused to cover incidents that occur while the bike is on a rental. For myself, I ensured my personal policy would be in place during a rental, if needed. Plus, I added an inexpensive umbrella policy that covers me up to $1,000,000.

THE RENTER:
Each company takes responsibility for verifying the renter has a valid motorcycle license. Before handing off the bike to a renter, the owner is obliged to take a photo of the renter's driver's license. It's not a terrible idea to double-check the expiration date of the license when doing so.

As mentioned earlier, the owner has the ability to communicate with a potential renter before accepting a rental. I use this as an opportunity to inquire about the renter's riding experience -- I'm not in the habit of renting to new riders that want to test ride bikes.

I'm a fan of overcommunicating, to keep the renter aware of anything that may impact their experience. For example, I had 3 rentals set up over a 2-week time period. My bike was knocked over by a car and had some minor damages. I let all 3 know about the incident right away, and said I intended to fix things before their rentals. One renter canceled. The other 2 said it wasn't a problem. Once I had the repairs done, I again messaged the 2 remaining renters, who both expressed appreciation for the update.

PERSONAL SAFETY & PROPERTY PROTECTION:
The fact remains that you are, most times, meeting a stranger and handing them the keys to your valuable property. There are still, sadly, people in the world that would like to take advantage of this. It's helpful there's no cash money being exchanged, so that keeps some of the real riff-raff away. Here are some things I do to keep myself and my property safe:
  • I don't do hand-offs at my home. Instead I use a local police station festooned with security cameras. And I make sure the renter is aware of this in advance.
  • I check the renter's name in my state's public-access court records system, looking for any history of concerning cases.
  • I usually bring someone with me to the hand-off. Most of the times it's my wife, who I can explain to the renter is there to give me a ride home. My companion keeps an eye on the proceedings and is ready to call for help if necessary.
  • I have investigated, but not yet purchased, tracking devices. Check with your state laws about this, as some prevent you from tracking someone without their knowledge. Most of the devices I looked into required a monthly subscription fee. Apple AirTag is something I've been hearing about as a potential solution, but I haven't looked much into it yet.
CANCELLATIONS & REFUSING RENTALS:
Cancellations are just an accepted part of this industry. I've had people cancel because they didn't like the looks of the weather during their rental period, because they were stuck in Europe due to COVID restrictions, because their plans changed, and so on. Since I don't rely on this income, it doesn't bother me too much -- it just means more days where I get to ride the bike instead of a renter.

Something I've seen change since I started is how the P2P companies have been treating rental refusals by bike owners. Early on, I could decline as many rental requests as I wanted to, without ramifications. I suppose that was because they were trying to build their bike offerings to renters. More recently, I've been getting push-back any time I refuse a rental. RS has been the worst for this. Last year I declined a rental because the potential renter had very little riding experience. The next day, my bike was de-listed from the site. I had to reach out to them and explain the situation before they relisted it. This year, I was in communication with a potential renter and we were trying to work out details of hand-off times. We exceeded the 12-hour window RS gave for an acceptance, and the rental was automatically declined and my bike was again de-listed. I again had to contact them and explain the situation before they would relist my bike. And then I had to reach out to the renter, who was understandably miffed at my apparent refusal, and apologize.

COMMUNICATIONS:
As I've indicated, all companies offer a relatively easy means of communicating with the renter through internal messaging. I use it extensively in advance of accepting a rental. At, or just before hand-off, I usually provide the renter with my phone number for easier communications while the rental is ongoing. That way they can get to me faster if they have a problem with or questions about the bike.

EARNINGS:
OK, you've read this far, finally time to talk about $$$.

The bike owner sets the daily rental price. I know TR has upper and lower limits on rates. Each company has their own fee structure, so it's important to understand that before deciding on which you want to list on. Also, most will automatically offer discounts for multi-day rentals. My daily rental rate is currently $90, but on RS for example it can go down to as low as $50/day if someone rents it for enough days. When I began, I started at a pretty low rate ($70, I think). This was so I could get some renters who would hopefully then leave me positive comments. Once that happened, I began increasing my daily rate.

Of that $90, I will make between $65-$75 per day. Here is what I made from some recent rentals:
RS, 5 days, $265
RS, 1 day, $67
RS, 6 day, $191
TR, 1 day, $63
TR, 2 day, $105 (my daily rate was $80 for this one)
ER, 2 day, $135


I'm sure there's more to talk about, but hopefully this information is helpful to anyone thinking about or just getting started with P2P rental.
 

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Thanks for posting, interesting information.
I haven't been riding the Strom much since I got the Multi, this is an interesting option compared to selling it.
 
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Thanks for this great write up! I've heard of this, but never investigated. I work full-time during the week, so renting my bike out while I'm at work would be a nice little income generator. We shall see!
 

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How do you handle small scrapes/"damage"? Like, say the person scuffed up a side case (like rubbed it against a pole in a parking lot by accident). So case isn't broken, but scuff is real and will not clean up or polish out.

Or say they used some bungee cords to strap some stuff down and the finish on the rear panels got rubbed/scuffed up?

In the rental car world this is a no biggie, no claim kind of thing. But with the motorcycle, if you let this stuff slide, your rental bike just looks rougher and rougher over time. It also seems a bit wrong to charge the renter ~$500 for scuffing a side case (estimating $500 to replace the case). Most people would be very shocked if Hertz/Enterprise/Etc charged them a few hundred for a door ding.
 

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Nice write up. I was looking to trailer my bike from Porkland to San Diego this fall to ride with my BIL. Turns out, cheaper to fly vs. gas and wear/tear. And, saves several days of slabbing my truck and trailer.
 

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I appreciate your thread post. Maybe I'll rent from one of those sites in the future, could be cool.

Question: do any renters also offer gear? I was thinking how great it could be to explore a cool place while vacationing via 2 wheels
 

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Interesting read and thanks for posting. I would mostly think of this for a spare bike, not my main bike.
I would probably be a renter however rather than owner renting out.

Do you not have to pay more for your insurance since you mentioned making sure that you were covered?
 

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The idea of forums is to invite all with an opinion to contribute so as to get a realistic picture of the discussion you have created.
You have carefully thought through a system which protects you from possible risk when dealing with strangers which is very clever - but to only invite a one sided response is detrimental to a balanced debate.

My question is concerning insurance. In Australia insurance companies need to have riders names listed and impose substantial penalties for unknown or under 25 riders.
Also a declaration of private or commercial use must be answered and I am sure that a fee paying enterprise would open up a whole new discussion with my insurers.
If a non-fault write-off collision did occur, what are your options?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
How do you handle small scrapes/"damage"?
I haven't had this happen yet. I will say that, while I try to keep my bike in decent shape, it's by no means pristine. So an occasional scratch or scuff wouldn't be that noticeable. I can say from having completed close to a dozen rentals so far, none have caused any damage I've been able to notice. If something significant were damaged (say a dent in said $500 sidebag, or a cracked windscreen), I would reach out to the P2P company to inquire about their property damage insurance covering it.

do any renters also offer gear?
Some do. I can't recall which company it is, but I know at least one offers that as an option. The owner sets the rental rate for that as well. On whichever site it is, I offer rental of any of my spare gear: jacket, pants, gloves, boots...even a helmet if they want to stick their head into my smelly old Scorpion.

Do you not have to pay more for your insurance since you mentioned making sure that you were covered?
I called my insurance agent and asked if my bike was covered by my existing policy if it was rented to someone. I was told I would be covered. I suppose there's always a chance that could change but, for me, so far, so good.

The idea of forums is to invite all with an opinion to contribute so as to get a realistic picture of the discussion you have created.
You have carefully thought through a system which protects you from possible risk when dealing with strangers which is very clever - but to only invite a one sided response is detrimental to a balanced debate.
My topic, my rules :p
I have no way to enforce, as I'm not a moderator. Simply a respectful request. I absolutely invite anyone to start up a separate topic to debate the pros and cons, to which I will happily contribute.

My question is concerning insurance. In Australia insurance companies need to have riders names listed and impose substantial penalties for unknown or under 25 riders.
Also a declaration of private or commercial use must be answered and I am sure that a fee paying enterprise would open up a whole new discussion with my insurers.
If a non-fault write-off collision did occur, what are your options?
I guess I should have noted I'm in the USA. I'm not aware of any of the companies I listed as currently making themselves available outside the US (though I think I heard an interview with the owner of TR that talked about their entry into Canada). As for your insurance question, I've heard that new policies are more frequently asking questions about commercial use. This is not only due to P2P companies, but also the likes of Uber/Lyft. I'm not conversant on the insurance rules of Australia or other countries; here there are so many property insurers that it's not too hard to shop around to find one that suits one's needs best.

If I understand what you mean by a "no-fault write-off collision", I believe that's what the company's property damage coverage is in place for. If a renter crashed my bike and the cost of repairs was near enough to its current value (let's say $5000), my understanding is that their insurance would pay me out for it. I wouldn't recommend listing a bike with a value higher than the P2P company's max property damage pay-out. Sorry, all you Arch owners.
 

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Thanks for sharing. I wouldn't rent my only bike, but now that there's two in my stable I may consider it. Could help pay for getting a third!
 
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I checked into these rental outfits several years ago, and it was nothing but Eagle Rider with Harleys for usually $200/day. At least in my area.

Looked just now, at all the outfits OP mentions, and am happy to say that the options have expanded considerably.

There's even a Honda ST1100 available!
 

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called my insurance agent and asked if my bike was covered by my existing policy if it was rented to someone. I was told I would be covered
It may be prudent to get this in writing. Not uncommon for agents to be less than fully conversant in the products they sell. Here, in the GWN, if a vehicle is used for a commercial purpose, the policy is different than for private. Unlike in AU, we don't have to name anyone who rides the bike but they do have to have a MC endorsement and your permission, but you cannot be paid by the rider or it is now a commercial enterprise. It the world of insurance companies and their lawyers, it would be better to be safe than sorry. Damages to the bike are one thing, but what happens if your renter hurts someone (or worse) and your insurance company says "oh, you are not covered for commercial operations"........there goes your net worth in the lawsuit since you are the registered owner.
 

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I should qualify. In AU an owner needs to name regular users to avoid a policy excess (on my policy anyway). There is a financial penalty if an unspecified rider, licensed or not, causes a claim.
 

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Nope. This is our forum - and you do not make the rules.
I don't find this rules-lawyering approach helpful or courteous. It's bad manners. Yes, we know you're an administrator. No need to remind everyone here.

OP is part of "our," as am I. It costs us nothing to respect his (very reasonable) request. Not every thread on every topic needs to be a free-for-all debate. Those who aren't interested have nearly unlimited amounts of other places to discuss whatever interests them.

In that spirit, I'm not going to state my position on renting out one's personal motorcycle. However I will say that I've found this thread refreshing. Mostly, folks have respected OP's modest request, and the resulting discussion been very informative.
 

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With respect, discussion is only informative when you look at both sides of the coin.
 

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Before I begin, a simple request: This topic is for people who are interested in learning more about peer-to-peer (P2P) bike rental. It's accepted there are those who "could never possibly consider such a ludicrous idea", for whom "the risks aren't worth the benefits", who believe "my Baby shall only be touched by my hands and those of God". This topic isn't for the latter. If you are one of those who disagrees with P2P rental, I respectfully ask you to start your own topic.

BACKGROUND:
I was once a person that would not let anyone ride my motorcycle. I wanted to keep my motorcycle as pristine as possible, and one of the ways I could help ensure that was to be the only one riding it. And, if something did happen (which it did), I was going to be the one making the repairs and getting it back on the road. But a few years ago I started changing (perhaps evolving?) my thinking to more of a 'things are just things' attitude. I think I'm happier for doing so.

So when the concept of P2P bike rental first became a thing, I saw it is a good test of my newer mindset. I listed my 2012 DL650 on two sites in quick succession and waited. And waited. And waited. And then I got my first rental.

I feel bad for that first renter, because I quizzed him mercilessly before agreeing to the rental (Point #1: The sites allow you to communicate with a potential renter before agreeing to the rental). I was nervous as H when I handed the keys over, and couldn't even watch him ride away for fear I'd see something that would cause me to second-guess my decision over the next 24 hours. Which I did anyways.

But the bike came back fine, and the renter was happy. So happy, in fact, he rented it again a few months later.

That first year, I think I only had 3 rentals. The next year, I had maybe 6-7. This season so far, I already have 5 reservations, and the bike is out on a 5-day rental right now.

Thanks, this is really good info. I’ve rented from Rideshare and had really good experience, I just bought my own bike and have been contemplating renting it but had concern. Your post really helps demystify it.

Best,

Mich

For me, the risk IS worth the reward, as all my rental income goes into a 'Bike Fund' that I can draw off of for needed repairs, new gear (splurged on a new Klim riding jacket this year), and, hopefully in 1-2 years, fund the cash purchase of a new bike.

Here is information, tips and techniques I've discovered based on my experiences with P2P rental. I'm no expert, just a user that's learned a few things about a relatively new concept in rentals.

THE PLAYERS:
I'm aware of 3 companies currently offering P2P motorcycle rental at this time:
Twisted Road (TR)
I believe they were the first.

Riders Share (RS)
The one I currently get most of my rentals from.

EagleShare (ES)
An off-shoot of the established bike rental company EagleRider, been around for about a year.

My bike is listed on all 3, at the same daily rate.

INSURANCE:
The first question usually asked by someone inquiring about this is about insurance. Each company has its own way of handling it, but here's the short version. While the bike is out on a rental, it's covered by the company's property damage insurance. The amounts vary, but it's around $10,000-$25,000 in damages. All companies offer liability coverage to some extent. Their offers seem to improve every time I look; the last time I did I believe it was TR that included the state-mandated minimum liability coverage as part of the rental, but the bike owner can pay a little extra for a higher amount of coverage. I know ES offers up to $1,000,000 in liability coverage for "qualified" owners. If you're new to this, I recommend researching and fully understanding the insurance offerings of each company before listing your bike.

It's also a good idea to check with your own insurance company to make sure it will cover you if the bike is out on a rental. Some insurance companies have refused to cover incidents that occur while the bike is on a rental. For myself, I ensured my personal policy would be in place during a rental, if needed. Plus, I added an inexpensive umbrella policy that covers me up to $1,000,000.

THE RENTER:
Each company takes responsibility for verifying the renter has a valid motorcycle license. Before handing off the bike to a renter, the owner is obliged to take a photo of the renter's driver's license. It's not a terrible idea to double-check the expiration date of the license when doing so.

As mentioned earlier, the owner has the ability to communicate with a potential renter before accepting a rental. I use this as an opportunity to inquire about the renter's riding experience -- I'm not in the habit of renting to new riders that want to test ride bikes.

I'm a fan of overcommunicating, to keep the renter aware of anything that may impact their experience. For example, I had 3 rentals set up over a 2-week time period. My bike was knocked over by a car and had some minor damages. I let all 3 know about the incident right away, and said I intended to fix things before their rentals. One renter canceled. The other 2 said it wasn't a problem. Once I had the repairs done, I again messaged the 2 remaining renters, who both expressed appreciation for the update.

PERSONAL SAFETY & PROPERTY PROTECTION:
The fact remains that you are, most times, meeting a stranger and handing them the keys to your valuable property. There are still, sadly, people in the world that would like to take advantage of this. It's helpful there's no cash money being exchanged, so that keeps some of the real riff-raff away. Here are some things I do to keep myself and my property safe:
  • I don't do hand-offs at my home. Instead I use a local police station festooned with security cameras. And I make sure the renter is aware of this in advance.
  • I check the renter's name in my state's public-access court records system, looking for any history of concerning cases.
  • I usually bring someone with me to the hand-off. Most of the times it's my wife, who I can explain to the renter is there to give me a ride home. My companion keeps an eye on the proceedings and is ready to call for help if necessary.
  • I have investigated, but not yet purchased, tracking devices. Check with your state laws about this, as some prevent you from tracking someone without their knowledge. Most of the devices I looked into required a monthly subscription fee. Apple AirTag is something I've been hearing about as a potential solution, but I haven't looked much into it yet.
CANCELLATIONS & REFUSING RENTALS:
Cancellations are just an accepted part of this industry. I've had people cancel because they didn't like the looks of the weather during their rental period, because they were stuck in Europe due to COVID restrictions, because their plans changed, and so on. Since I don't rely on this income, it doesn't bother me too much -- it just means more days where I get to ride the bike instead of a renter.

Something I've seen change since I started is how the P2P companies have been treating rental refusals by bike owners. Early on, I could decline as many rental requests as I wanted to, without ramifications. I suppose that was because they were trying to build their bike offerings to renters. More recently, I've been getting push-back any time I refuse a rental. RS has been the worst for this. Last year I declined a rental because the potential renter had very little riding experience. The next day, my bike was de-listed from the site. I had to reach out to them and explain the situation before they relisted it. This year, I was in communication with a potential renter and we were trying to work out details of hand-off times. We exceeded the 12-hour window RS gave for an acceptance, and the rental was automatically declined and my bike was again de-listed. I again had to contact them and explain the situation before they would relist my bike. And then I had to reach out to the renter, who was understandably miffed at my apparent refusal, and apologize.

COMMUNICATIONS:
As I've indicated, all companies offer a relatively easy means of communicating with the renter through internal messaging. I use it extensively in advance of accepting a rental. At, or just before hand-off, I usually provide the renter with my phone number for easier communications while the rental is ongoing. That way they can get to me faster if they have a problem with or questions about the bike.

EARNINGS:
OK, you've read this far, finally time to talk about $$$.

The bike owner sets the daily rental price. I know TR has upper and lower limits on rates. Each company has their own fee structure, so it's important to understand that before deciding on which you want to list on. Also, most will automatically offer discounts for multi-day rentals. My daily rental rate is currently $90, but on RS for example it can go down to as low as $50/day if someone rents it for enough days. When I began, I started at a pretty low rate ($70, I think). This was so I could get some renters who would hopefully then leave me positive comments. Once that happened, I began increasing my daily rate.

Of that $90, I will make between $65-$75 per day. Here is what I made from some recent rentals:
RS, 5 days, $265
RS, 1 day, $67
RS, 6 day, $191
TR, 1 day, $63
TR, 2 day, $105 (my daily rate was $80 for this one)
ER, 2 day, $135


I'm sure there's more to talk about, but hopefully this information is helpful to anyone thinking about or just getting started with P2P rental.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I thought I'd give an update with some experience from the newest of the P2P rental players, EagleShare. As mentioned previously, ES is the P2P off-shoot of EagleRider.

So far I've only done the check-in portion of my rental. This means the bike is currently out on a rental. Upon return, the renter and I will do the check-out or return process.

Based on my experience with the other companies, ES's check-in process is much more complicated, with far more steps. TR & RS are pretty similar -- owner and renter meet, both fill out their mostly identical online forms, take mostly identical photos, and submit individually. That's it. ES required a separate process for the renter to complete before we met, then had me complete my portion of the process, including photos. Once I submitted that, I had to wait for the renter to accept my form and complete their own form. After the renter completed their process, they submitted and I had to accept. Also, the forms required, at least on my side, were far more detailed than anything from the other companies. It pretty much required a full once-over of the bike, checking tires, oil level, brake functioning, etc. I suspect ES's expanded process is related to the fact they're an established company and it probably mimics what's done when their ER division does a dealer-sponsored rental. RS & TR, being not much beyond start-up phase, are less refined. I guess time will tell if that's to their benefit or not.
 
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