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Thanks, I turned off TC and it did help the snappiness throttling from idle.. kinda sucks you have to lose TC to smooth out the throttle
Hmm.. I had TC2 enabled and the bike was civilized and throttle response was perfect. I feel the BP really mitigated that issue for me.
 

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Hi, guys!
I was found on the other forum answer on the questions about TPS adjustement at DL1000 L8. I have the same problem at my Wee 1000 L8, a little more wibrations, and I will try with TPS adjustement and TB sinchronization, but for TB sinchronization I need OBD diagnostic tester and vacum metters. I must found it yet.

Here is link:
//vstrom-klv.eu/index.php/topic,1517.0.html
 

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So, TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) check not withstanding, the owner options are:
- Booster Plug - $159.95
- Dynojet Power Commander Fuel Controller - $210
- Dynojet Power Commander V - $290
- Woolich Racing ECU self-flashing package - $481.00 (or $100 for YOUR ECU if you have access to the software and USB flashing unit)

1. The Booster Plug just fakes a cooler-than-actual ambient air temp (simple but not tunable and not ideal for non-stock exhausts).
2. The Dynojet PCFC easily allows infinitely adjustable fueling at various throttle positions.
3. The Dynojet PC-V, above what the PCFC does, this adds ignition timing adjustment and an add-on "switch map" button and/or quick-shifter option.
4. The Woolich Racing ECU flash package allows custom tuning of over a dozen ECU parameters/options.

Without much chance of finding someone local who can loan me their Woolich Racing kit so I can buy a $100 ECU license, my only logical option with a Yoshimura R77 slip-on is the Dynojet PCFC (ordered with the slip-on). The Booster Plug folks describe the Power Commander as being like playing with a hand grenade but that's ridiculous - if you're THAT stupid then you were going to destroy the bike and maybe yourself anyway.
 

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So, TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) check not withstanding, the owner options are:
- Booster Plug - $159.95
- Dynojet Power Commander Fuel Controller - $210
- Dynojet Power Commander V - $290
- Woolich Racing ECU self-flashing package - $481.00 (or $100 for YOUR ECU if you have access to the software and USB flashing unit)

1. The Booster Plug just fakes a cooler-than-actual ambient air temp (simple but not tunable and not ideal for non-stock exhausts).
2. The Dynojet PCFC easily allows infinitely adjustable fueling at various throttle positions.
3. The Dynojet PC-V, above what the PCFC does, this adds ignition timing adjustment and an add-on "switch map" button and/or quick-shifter option.
4. The Woolich Racing ECU flash package allows custom tuning of over a dozen ECU parameters/options.

Without much chance of finding someone local who can loan me their Woolich Racing kit so I can buy a $100 ECU license, my only logical option with a Yoshimura R77 slip-on is the Dynojet PCFC (ordered with the slip-on). The Booster Plug folks describe the Power Commander as being like playing with a hand grenade but that's ridiculous - if you're THAT stupid then you were going to destroy the bike and maybe yourself anyway.
Don't underestimate how easily you can screw something up with a full flash. It takes a lot of experience, and failure, to get to the point where you are a subject matter expert.

I went the boosterplug route. A slipon doesn't require a full tune, just a mild AF ratio change to the richer side and your done. That way you are keeping the very good OEM tune, albeit a little richer only in open loop operation. Closed loop relies on the lambda sensor and goes as lean as possible for fuel economy.

If I had unlimited time, no kids, no job and no other hobbies, I would definitely go the PC route and nerd out hard.
 

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I have a PCFC on my 2014, the Dynojet tune was a improvement over stock but it took a custom tune to get the best out of it.

Without the custom tune I would not bother with the PCFC it's only half a job.
 

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Without the custom tune I would not bother with the PCFC it's only half a job.
Your custom tune was provided via dynamometer testing? It would be great if more people bothered to upload their fuel maps. Dynojet's Map Search currently lists just four downloadable maps for the 2nd gen V-Strom 1000:
  • Stock exhaust, stock air filter
  • Arrow slip-on, stock air filter
  • Arrow full system, stock air filter
  • European model, Delkevic de-cat system, stock or aftermarket air filter
Any chance you'd be willing to upload your custom tune and exhaust/air filter specifics so that other V-Strom users could benefit from your work on the dyno?
 

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Don't underestimate how easily you can screw something up with a full flash. It takes a lot of experience, and failure, to get to the point where you are a subject matter expert.
I've had little difficulty experimenting with both Bazzaz and Power Commander fuel controllers in the past. I also hacked my car's infotainment system using step-by-step instructions found online to enabled mfr disabled functionality and to make the car accessible via WiFi from my laptop.

Using the Woolich software to change things like Fan Temperature or Deceleration Fuel Cut is hardly rocket science. Not meaning to put too fine a point on it but how much experience do you have in knowing how much experience and failure is required? No doubt some folks would say I was "insane" to change the default background on my new car's infotainment system (and other things) but I found it well within my skills and worth doing. I do ALL my own work on every vehicle I own. No doubt some vehicle owner's aren't competent enough to even change a tire but that doesn't stop me from performing detailed and meticulous work for myself, even complex jobs. I ride motorcycles not because it's simple but because it's technically difficult to do well (and frankly beyond most people).
 

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Your custom tune was provided via dynamometer testing? It would be great if more people bothered to upload their fuel maps. Dynojet's Map Search currently lists just four downloadable maps for the 2nd gen V-Strom 1000:
  • Stock exhaust, stock air filter
  • Arrow slip-on, stock air filter
  • Arrow full system, stock air filter
  • European model, Delkevic de-cat system, stock or aftermarket air filter
Any chance you'd be willing to upload your custom tune and exhaust/air filter specifics so that other V-Strom users could benefit from your work on the dyno?
I started with stock air filter and slip on.

I had looked at getting a down load but at this point it has just never happened.

Do plan on getting another tune as I don't think the one I currently have works that well with the up graded ECU.

I may try to get my current one and the new one some time in the near future.
 

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I've had little difficulty experimenting with both Bazzaz and Power Commander fuel controllers in the past. I also hacked my car's infotainment system using step-by-step instructions found online to enabled mfr disabled functionality and to make the car accessible via WiFi from my laptop.

Using the Woolich software to change things like Fan Temperature or Deceleration Fuel Cut is hardly rocket science. Not meaning to put too fine a point on it but how much experience do you have in knowing how much experience and failure is required? No doubt some folks would say I was "insane" to change the default background on my new car's infotainment system (and other things) but I found it well within my skills and worth doing. I do ALL my own work on every vehicle I own. No doubt some vehicle owner's aren't competent enough to even change a tire but that doesn't stop me from performing detailed and meticulous work for myself, even complex jobs. I ride motorcycles not because it's simple but because it's technically difficult to do well (and frankly beyond most people).
It's a commitment. It's not free. If you have the time and determination, and accept the risk, your likelihood of success is high.

But let's not pretend that anyone can successfully modify a fuel map without a significant investment in time, research and trial and error. Otherwise dynos, custom tune shops and services wouldn't exist. You obviously have all the above, hence why you're confident.

HPTuners experience on multiple cars over the years allows me to say the above. It was a phase. Time is finite, and I would prefer to ride, or go the gym, or spend time with the kids, or.... <enter your preferred activity here>
 

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Discussion Starter #72
It's a commitment. It's not free. If you have the time and determination, and accept the risk, your likelihood of success is high.

But let's not pretend that anyone can successfully modify a fuel map without a significant investment in time, research and trial and error. Otherwise dynos, custom tune shops and services wouldn't exist. You obviously have all the above, hence why you're confident.

HPTuners experience on multiple cars over the years allows me to say the above. It was a phase. Time is finite, and I would prefer to ride, or go the gym, or spend time with the kids, or.... <enter your preferred activity here>
True statement

I was the first NA 2018 DL1000 Woolich tuned, it didn't work out of the box, but exchanged tons of emails, trial/error... Today you can tune a 2018 DL1000 relatively without issue (didn't test all the features, but the main ones are ok), maps on the other hand if you don't have access to a dyno don't touch it.

I also tuned my other vehicles and was a beta tester for the zf 8 speed transmission tuning. It's really a commitment as all my warranty are void but accept the risk.
 

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I have the PC III on my 2002 DL1000. I have been tweaking one of the Monkey Grass maps for the best balance of smoothness / driveability, low end power, full throttle high rev power and a green "eco" zone in the middle. I'm getting close. I am using the PC III software and Microsoft Excel spreadsheet program to keep things straight.

PC III and PC V are different. I don't think the PC V maps can go on a PC III, but I also think PC III to PC V is doable.

The 2002-2003 ECU's are different than the 2004-200?. The maps for the 2004> are too rich for the earlier ECU.

There are maps to choose from in the PC III section here. Is there a PC V section? Maybe there are maps there, too.

If I make a map that satisfies me for the 2002-03, I will certainly share it. Keep in mind, what I am doing is tweaking the PC III which, in turn, tweaks the stock ECU fuel map while the engine is running. It does not actually change the stock ECU map.

Cheers,
Glenn
 

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Allow me to suggest something that may improve your throttle response. Check your Throttle Position Sensor setting. This is REAL simple and quick and will cost you nothing to check.

The lesson here is twofold: Never assume the factory settings are correct, and dont do performance mods trying to correct drivability issues until you make sure the specified settings are right.
Brilliant information. My new to me 2014 Vee2 was getting a new air filter and Dynojet PCFC anyway so, with these instructions, it was a no-brainer to replace the tamper-resistant T-25 Torx screws with regular Phillips screws and to adjust the TPS. My TPS was way off - the correct position is now significantly off the painted mark applied at the factory. The Secondary Throttle Valve plates were off too - very easy to adjust that. Both the secondary throttle and the exhaust valve (both fully-automatic) appear to self-calibrate at start-up. The only issue is ensuring that the front throttle body (slave) is timed to the rear throttle body (master).
 

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I can't get mine dialed in...

2018 DL 1000... using the factory tool to switch modes... the hyphen is in the low position. I've only lifted the rear of the tank, not taken it off. Reaching in there with my too big fingers, I have rotated the sensor through its range and the hyphen never leaves the bottom position. Anyone else seen this?

If I turn the throttle, the hyphen jumps to the upper position but when the throttle snaps back it's back to low. I tried adding more slack to the cable so now it's a bit looser than spec: same, hyphen stuck at the low position.

MAZ4Me mentions making the adjustment slowly. Pretty hard to do reaching in there. But I would think if I were just going too far and turning through the sweet spot, the hyphen would jump to the top. But it doesn't; it just stays at the bottom.

Of course, the tank is completely full, so I've been trying to avoid pulling it which I would need to do to see what really is going on.

I thought I might try it running and see if the hyphen jumps to the top at 1500 rpm as Bighammer mentioned, but I don't want to asphyxiate myself and it's too cold out there to do much with the garage door open!

Anyone else seen this or have any suggestions?


Thanks,

Vinnie
 

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Hi Blaustrom,

Yes, I could easily be on the wrong one. Give me two screws to turn and I will invariably hit the wrong one!

I have the service manual, but, wow, the picture there isn't very helpful - I couldn't tell what the heck I was looking at.

I'm on the sensor that has the connector pointing up.

(When I wasn't getting anywhere I came in and checked the fiche and saw that there are two sensors and of course the label on the fiche isn't very informative either: just says "sensor" with the same part number.)

I cracked the garage door open and ran the bike letting it get up to 3 bars on the temp meter. Moving the sensor with the connector pointing up makes the idle change a lot, so I put it back to where I think it was before I started by turning it until the idle is about right. And it's more or less where I remember it being when I started.

At this point it's idling a hair under 1300, maybe 1250 with the hyphen in the bottom position. The hyphen jumps to the middle spot at about 1700 rpm and then to the top position at about 2800 rpm.

If you could let me know whether I'm on the correct sensor and which sensor the other one is, that would be terrific!

Thanks!

Vinnie
 

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I don't have a picture. It's quite crowded with a lot of wiring around mine.

But since you adjusted the wrong one, its the other one you did not touch ;-)

It needs only little movement to make a difference! So go about it gently.
 

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Thanks! I'll give it a shot tomorrow.





Vinnie
Ok, for future reference for anyone else doing this, once I came in from the cold garage, I found a good location diagram in the manua that shows these sensors. I found it at the beginning of the "Engine Electrical Device" section, page 0C3 of my manual (which includes the L8 - I suspect the page number may be different for earlier years). Looks like I was turning the STP sensor, which is shown in the book as having the conector at 12 o'clock. The TPS sensor appears in this diagram to be below that one and has the connector pointing to about 4 o'clock. Here's hoping that I got the STP sensor back close enough to where it was so that I don't have to take more stuff apart.

Thanks to Blaustrom for the help.

Vinnie




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