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Discussion Starter #1
Hi to all.
I very often find myself very tight and tense on the right hand and trouble in keeping the thorotle and revs in same spot when doing tight u-turn and such.also having difficulty adjusting my speed.
Do you adjust your speed by rear brake or clutch?
Just wondering what technics other riders use for slow walking pace speed for
U-turns,figure 8 and slow traffic.
What's the best that's works for you?
 

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I feather and slip the clutch and keep it in the friction zone, keep the revs up (which I think kinda keeps the gyro effect going helping to help keep you upright) control speed with the rear brake, then shift my body and weight a bit to the outside of the turn while I'm leaning the bike and turning the bars to the inside.

YouTube the concept. There's lots of videos. It feels weird but works well.


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Bike Nite? Where the hell is that? Slow race? I thought you lived in the country?? :confused: :green_lol:
 

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If you had been in the US you could have taken the MSF course during which you woulda done those slow speed exercises.
Being Down Under, I dunno if they offer beginner classes as they do here. Lots of practice can make the effort...less!
Slow race, winner gets across the finish line after everyone else has gone home.
 

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Practice, practice, practice! Find a good parking lot and use the lines to practice on your U-turns. Feather the clutch in the friction zone and pressure on the rear brake to stabilize the bike. Most important is to turn your head and look where you want the bike to go. Amazingly the bike tends to travel where you are looking. Don't cheat by only moving your eyes, turn your head.

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The key is practice. The Vee motor/clutch makes it pretty easy. I find you can slow u-turn the Vee darn near at idle.
 

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The biggest mistake most riders make when going slow is where you look,look where you want to go in 2-10 seconds don't look down.I am an instructor in the Canadian version of the MSF course and I have found that getting students to go really slow in a straight line first works best before making any turns.By this I mean I should be able to count the spokes slow,comfortably
 

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Practice, practice, practice! Find a good parking lot and use the lines to practice on your U-turns. Feather the clutch in the friction zone and pressure on the rear brake to stabilize the bike. Most important is to turn your head and look where you want the bike to go. Amazingly the bike tends to travel where you are looking. Don't cheat by only moving your eyes, turn your head.
YES!

A big advantage of fuel injected bikes for slow running is that the system will keep the engine at steady rpms as the load changes, within limits. You can just leave the engine idling and use the clutch for your speed control. Lightly dragging the rear brake is also a help. When turning, a sliver more clutch will tend to stand the bike up, and a sliver less will let the bike drop into a sharper turn. Try slow running in both 1st gear and 2nd gear. Some riders prefer one, some the other.

Find an empty safe parking lot with the parking spot lines painted at right angles, not diagonal parking. First ride on the straight line. Go slow, then slower, slow, slower, slow, slower, slow, really slow, slower, really slow, slower, really slow, etc. until you feel smooth at it. One or two good rides is not enough. A dozen is a good start and not enough. Change to turns. Make circles on the lines, maybe 4 lines across (often 8-1/2' or 9' wide per slot). Circle left several times emphasizing the full head turn to look where you need to go, and be comfortable and flexible on the bike--no tight muscles anywhere. Circle the other way. Slowly and smoothly. Don't be surprised if turns one way feel smoother than turns the other--that's common. Now do circles 3 lines across. Scooting your butt over on the seat to the outside of the turn so the bike is canted into the turn helps at slow speeds. If that size circle is difficult, use 3-1/2 lines across. Make several circles, then reverse direction. Now 3. Now 2-1/2. Do figure-8's on those lines, start with 4 slots. Emphasize the head turn. Scoot across the seat for each direction if you're comfortable doing that. Now do figure-8's 3-1/2 slots wide. Now 3 slots. Now 2-1/2.

Repeat tomorrow. And next weekend. And the next and the next. Perfect practice makes perfect. Don't try to progress faster than your balance develops.

On the street at higher speeds you need to shift your butt across the seat the other direction, i. e., toward the direction of the turn so you lean toward the pavement. But, take one thing at a time.
 

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I rode for the first time in 3 months, and realized my slow riding skills have weakened. Riding in traffic everyday during the spring summer and fall help a lot with that. I would also practice in a parking lot for a few minutes around once a week.

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
i have involve in an accident years ago and survived with broken femur,got hit from right handside.i always feel tense with right handside incoming cars even when i drive.mostly mental it is.no problem with left turns, but in australia we mostly do right u-turns and round abouts.left turns with my right foot on brake no problem because my right foot on brake is outside of the turn.i am more comfortable with left turns because i like to take off with my right foot been on brake.i am loosing a few seconds by the time put my foot on brake and trying to apply right pressure when i am already in mid turn.
 

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Skillmaster Course

Hello wbmania72, Here in NSW my wife Lida,I recently completed a day with Paul Reily at his Skillmaster Course Motorcycle training | Motorcycle services | Motorbike Training by Skill I am confident there will be something similar in Victoria. For Lida and I the course was fantastic and I highly reccommend it to everyone. Paul has since run a second course in Lithgow but seems to go where he is needed/wanted. Contact him. I am so much more confident now on my DL650. Rod
 

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Discussion Starter #14
hi rod1.i'll be keep an eye on it if ever happens in victoria anything like that.
i have been practicing a lot of slow speed riding since my last post and i admit that turning handlebar left and right very challenging.9 out of 10 times i find myself counter steering rather turning the bar whilst even doing counter weight+clutch and rear brake.
any advise from a guy who have recenty attended one of those courses?regards
 

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Important points

Hi again wbmania 72, Important points...use of footbrake, while slow speed turning and use of the 'Friction point' (slipping the clutch), at the same time and combined with moving your head around and 'looking' where you are going. The bike will go where you look so...dont look ahead..look around to where you are going...Try it on Roundabouts...foot brake on a little (trailing brake!), slipping the clutch as necessary and actually looking around the corners. Try looking at some on line videos by American Jerry Palladino. I purchased his videos which teach the same stuff with an American accent and found them invaluble. Anyway, Oh..be careful about using your hand brake while slow speed manuvering. Gentle, gentle if necessary, which it may not be. Anyone else is probably better than me in explaining these basics, however, Look where you are going around corners, use footbrake and friction point as necessary. Let me know how it goes, I would not want to put you on the wrong foot! Best wishes, Rod
 

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Another helpful tip is to grip the tank with your knees. This helps you impart a bit more finesse in maintaining your line, reducing the amount of fine tuning you have to deal with via the handlebars. You use a lot more body English riding at low low speeds than at speed. Use your whole body, not just your hands on the bars.

Also - keeping the throttle at a static setting is not the goal. Blipping the throttle, shutting it off entirely - combined with a bit of clutch slippage will allow you to keep your speed where you want. It's a finesse thing, and practice makes perfect. Every bike is different regarding the 'feel', which makes knowing your bike all the more important, but the same strategies apply to all bikes in general.
 

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For whats it's worth….This is how I slow ride

I was a motor officer for 10 years and enjoyed competing in the police motorcycle competitions. I always rode the Electra Glide. To compete in the slow courses, I would feather the clutch and gas, while alternately tapping the front and rear brake. Tapping the front brake leans the bike over more, a slight tap on the rear brings the bike more vertical. It takes a lot of practise, but it can be done… Just make sure you have good crash bars.. I know first hand on how good crash bars can save a big bike.

:thumbup:.
 

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Using front brake when going slow can be tricky. If the bars are turned, it can dump you. Hast'a be done just right. Dragging the rear brake is OK. Letting the clutch out a sliver stands the bike up, and pulling the clutch in a sliver lets the bike drop into the turn.
 

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I took a motors course a few years ago where all exercises had to be successfully completed on a 30%+ grade. Aside from correct use of throttle and clutch, correct brake timing was paramount. Not too bad on a KZP but wouldn't be much fun on an FLHTP. Brake dragging is great for learning but eventually isn't necessary and should not be used as a crutch.
 
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