StromTrooper banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,601 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Going up the hill in the clouds and fog with the Oxford grips at half power I noticed I was WFO and not accelerating. What the? I rolled off the throttle and felt it slip on the bars. When I wacked it open again it accelerated properly again. I turned the grip heat down and had no further problem.
Has anyone else had slippage when the heated grips are turned up? Warm glue not holding? :confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
From what I understand, the throttle tubes have long ridges that run lengthwise left-right, that key in with grooves on the inner walls of the rubber grips, so it's not glue holding them in place.
 

·
$tromtrooper
Joined
·
2,378 Posts
I couldn't bring myself to use the super glue provided with the Oxfords, but they were a very, very tight fight. Some slippage on the left grip on my scooter when running the grips, but I can live with it. On the Strom, I have a G2 Aluminum throttle tube. Very tight fit (really had to work and twist and grind to get it on) and no slippage. It ain't coming off even without the glue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
Going up the hill in the clouds and fog with the Oxford grips at half power I noticed I was WFO and not accelerating. What the? I rolled off the throttle and felt it slip on the bars. When I wacked it open again it accelerated properly again. I turned the grip heat down and had no further problem.
Has anyone else had slippage when the heated grips are turned up? Warm glue not holding? :confused:
I'm having the same problem, so will be interested in how it can be fixed, or should I say with what it can be fixed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
285 Posts
I didn't glue my throttle grip on, but have experienced slipping with the clutch side, more so when they are warm. I decided to use just a little superglue to lock in the clutch grip. Seems to hold and will probably break loose if I ever want to remove the grips (highly unlikely, as it's too much trouble to transfer everything to another bike. Easier to just get another set).

You must have really filed down the throttle tube ridges to have slippage. Mine were a really tight fit on install, and not moving anywhere.

Superglue either holds or it doesn't. Having the grips warm shouldn't loosen it up. And it sets so quickly you will know right away if it's going to hold.

Stick some more glue on there!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,601 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
OK so it's not just me. I got the bike , 2004, with the Oxfords already mounted. Now I know what to do if I get more problems. When I've installed grips that are tight I usually use compressed air with a long thin nozzle forced under the grip to help ease the grip on with no glue that can get soft with heat.
Thanks for the replies!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,852 Posts
EASY FIX

For many years racing Hare Scrambles is the 70's and 80's we would safety wire our grips to keep em from slipping. I still do it on my machines.
On many grips there is a channel running around the grips where the manufactures raise the rubber. Its in those channels you tie wire,then twist em tight, but don't over due it. Then nip the wire ends with some dikes, and bury twist around the 5 or 6 o'clock position into the grip. You want to keep it away from your palms and fingers, use stainless wire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
290 Posts
flashback

This discussion reminds me of my BSA A-10 chopper days. I changed the grips one day and took off riding around S.F. I had used Gask-a-cinch "gorilla snot" to glue the throttle grip, and gooped it on so heavy that it squeezed in between the throttle tube and the bars. As it gradually got stiffer, the throttle got increasingly difficult to turn, and eventually I found myself stuck wide open going up one of the famous hills. No ignition switch (magneto) or even kill button (I used to just stall it to kill the engine). Pulled in the clutch and let it over-rev and finally slowed down (brakes?) enough to yank off the plug caps. Those were the days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,852 Posts
This discussion reminds me of my BSA A-10 chopper days. I changed the grips one day and took off riding around S.F. I had used Gask-a-cinch "gorilla snot" to glue the throttle grip, and gooped it on so heavy that it squeezed in between the throttle tube and the bars. As it gradually got stiffer, the throttle got increasingly difficult to turn, and eventually I found myself stuck wide open going up one of the famous hills. No ignition switch (magneto) or even kill button (I used to just stall it to kill the engine). Pulled in the clutch and let it over-rev and finally slowed down (brakes?) enough to yank off the plug caps. Those were the days.
Nothing like a little shock now and then, ya never knew when ya where gonna get it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
For many years racing Hare Scrambles is the 70's and 80's we would safety wire our grips to keep em from slipping. I still do it on my machines.
On many grips there is a channel running around the grips where the manufactures raise the rubber. Its in those channels you tie wire,then twist em tight, but don't over due it. Then nip the wire ends with some dikes, and bury twist around the 5 or 6 o'clock position into the grip. You want to keep it away from your palms and fingers, use stainless wire.
probably not a good idea with (Oxford) heated grips.

firstly, theres no groove for the wire to reside, so unless it was tight enough to cut into the grip material you'd be able to feel the wire when riding.
sencondly, big chance off cutting or shorting the heater wires in the grips, by over tightening the tie wire or pressing the twist into the grip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,852 Posts
Guess its a fat chance with oxfords grips, work fine with zuk heaters though!
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top