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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm trying to get some friends into motorcycling.
Everyone wants cruisers.

I wanna try and put some people on V-Stroms, but everyone has a hard time putting their feet down when they put a leg over my bike. I've got a 2012.
I'm 6'1" (185.5 cm)
I have a 32 inch (81.5 cm) inseam

What's the shortest leg one has to have to get on a V-Strom?
 

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As often here, different people will tell you different answers.
I'm 5'6", 29" inseam, and no problem so far.
 

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I'm 5'8" with a 30" inseam. I was comfortable with the regular height of my 12' 650 Adventure but I bought some 1" lowering links anyway. I installed the links last weekend and I'm a lot more comfortable on the bike now. I used to stop with one foot planted on the ground but now I can get both feet down.
 

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5'5" 28". easier to handle than my DR which i have no problem with either
 

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5'9" 29" inseam, and built like a Greek God... (in my fondest dreams).

I put 3/4" Kouba lowering links on... standard height Sargent seat. Still on the balls of my feet (which is why I think thigh girth has something to do with reaching the ground... I'm built like a gorilla, with thick thighs).

All that being said, I'd rather be riding the Strom than ANY other bike with a 27" seat height... If anything, you become a bit more aware of road camber, parking space topology, etc... NOT a big deal...
 

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I think it's a bit tall for a first time rider unless they have heaps of confidence. My wife talked me into getting the V, I thought it was too much bike. Wouldn't swap for anything now:hurray:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I think it's a bit tall for a first time rider unless they have heaps of confidence. My wife talked me into getting the V, I thought it was too much bike. Wouldn't swap for anything now:hurray:
I thought it was too much bike, as the V-Strom is my first bike and I had previously been looking at the Ninja 250.

Being able to put both feet flat on the ground (in tennis shoes) on the V-Strom was a HUGE benefit to me in feeling confident with the bigger bike. It's a bit heavier than I'd like, but I just need to get in shape.
 

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5'-4" 27" inseam rode the bike for a week while lowering links came in. With the lowering links (adjustable soupy's) and bringing forks up in triple tree I can stand one foot flat and the other on toes, or balls of my feet with both. I am thinking if raising to give better clearance, got a buddy moving back this way and he and his bmw will want to do some trails.


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I have no idea why (probably cruiser salesmen or something), but the preposterous idea that you MUST be able to flat-foot a bike with both feet has really taken hold.

Perhaps that's true for beginners, or perhaps in places where earthquakes at stoplights are common. But if you have the skills, you can ride whatever you want.

My personal favorite illustration of this was a 5'4" friend of mine who was curious about my KLR650 and borrowed it for a ride across town. Not only is it a very tall bike in the first place, but the suspension is set up to suit me, and I weigh about double what he does. The suspension barely moved when he clambered aboard.

He's a skilled rider, so no problems at all. Granted, he had to slide sideways off the seat at every stop sign and leave one thigh draped over the seat...

Another friend who's a fairly skinny 5'6" has ridden my Vee a few times with no troubles. It's wearing 5/8" raising links, plus the suspension is set up for a much heavier rider -- about as tall as you can get. Again, no trouble at all even in city riding.
 

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all depends on how comfortable you are without two flat feet on the ground. But i envy you at 32 inseam, -i am a 29ish inseam.

i have not lower my bike, but have cut the seat rubber feet in half and shave about 5mm of the seat locking block. I can just put both balls of my feet on the ground - it's about good enough for me.
 

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I echo what others have said, which is it depends on how experienced you are as a rider. I am 5'8" with just about a 30" inseam. I did lower my '11 Wee 1" with Soupy adjustable lowering links, and was able to put about 3/4 of both feet down. When I purchased my '14 Vee2, I got a lowered seat. I can put the balls of both feet down but that's it. That said, I actually like being higher up on my Vee2 than my Wee. It is a more commanding position. I am willing to be more careful when stopping/stopped in exchange for riding higher. I learned on a DR200, and was spoiled ever since. Personally, I find the cruiser lower seated position weird, awkward and no fun - I guess its' what you get used to and enjoy.
 

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Hi, I am BumbleV and I am vertically challenged. Put lowering links on my '08, but have since raised it back to stock height. Just took out the bumpers on the seat and have lowered the front end a bit. Just be careful when stopped in windy conditions...
 

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Whoa... re-read the OP, and missed that he wants to get short-legged friends INTO (aka NEW riders) motorcycling.

I have to swing my vote... As much as I love the Strom, unless your friends are *very* confident out of the gate, it's too much bike for a brand new rider. I'd recommend something a bit more confidence-inspiring (a-la shorter height, perhaps a bit less power).
We go through LOTS of bikes in our riding tenure... why not start out with something they'll be comfortable with.
 

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IMHO every rider should spend at least a few months on a small beginner bike. They are cheap to buy, with enough power to learn but not enough to get into trouble. They are also light and nimble. They should only be used around town and low speed country roads, but that should be enough to whet the appetite.

After they get some experience, move them up to a bigger bike, and sell the small bike for pretty much what they paid.

I started on a Honda CB360, moved to a Yamaha 500, then a Honda 750Shadow, a Kawasaki Concourse, and finally the Vee .
 

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I'm 5'-8" with a 30" inseam. I rode dirt bikes growing up, but didn't ride on the street until a little over a year ago. A 2007 Wee is my first road bike. I liked the upright seating position and controls underneath me, plus the ability to use the pegs to lift myself up a bit to get over bumps, etc.

Like others, I have cut the seat rubber cushions in half, which allows me to put the balls of both feet on the ground, I can flat foot one site and get a toe down on the other if I want. Under normal circumstances, that's fairly comfortable for me, although I do pay extra attention when stopping while stradling a dip in the pavement and/or stopping on a side slope. I don't have much margine for error.

I feel that I spend a little too much time worrying about that and had been considering lowering the bike a little (maybe 1/2"). Found a member trading up to a V2 and returned his Wee to stock height, so picked up his Soupy links at a great price. Since the closest I'll get to offroad is gravel, I'm not worried about losing the ground clearance.
 

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5'6", 32" inseam on a good day.

yeah, IMO, if newish , start on a smaller bike.

when i got back into riding almost 5 years ago, we got a honda shadow aero 750. good starter bike and my 5'2" friend had no problem riding it. 4 months on that then bumped to a sabre 1100. then have ridden all others in my sig plus hubbies concours, vulcan classic.

i'm on the balls of my feet. i don't want to give up my centerstand to put links on it. shaving down the sides of the seat helps, too.
 

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5'8" on a good day 29"inseam. Cut the seat pads in half and added 3/4 Kouba lowering link keeps me on balls of my feet. I grew up riding dirt bikes and had to slide halfway off the side of the bike on the balls of my feet is no big deal. The V-strom would be a difficult bike to learn to ride on especially for those vertically challenged. Not a good first bike but could be the second bike. Flat footing is for the tall or the cruiser crowd and not necessary.
 

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Ninja 500 is a fantastic first bike, and you could buy 4 for the price of a V-Strom :) I bought mine, road it for 6 months an sold it for what I paid for it. Get one around 1500-2000 and it wont depreciate anymore.

Power wise those 500's are fantastic, it felt a lot faster then the v-strom does. In reality they are about the same but seat of the pants feeling the ninja felt much quicker.
 

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5'7" with a 30" inseam. It's just fine for me, albeit a little on the tall side. Flat footing a bike isn't necessary on the road, but when you're waiting at a stoplight it can get tiring to keep the bike upright without both feet flat on the ground, especially if you're catching some wind.

The only time that I really want to be able to flat foot it is for maneuvering in neutral with your legs, like when you have to exit a parking space in reverse for example. I'm having a hard time doing that because of the bike's size. Also manually pushing/pulling it over a bump in the road or something while you're in the seat is sometimes impossible with just your tips on the ground.
 
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