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So I'm taking the MSF course in a few weeks, and cannot wait to get on a strom afterwards (thinking about the 650 abs). Part of the requirement of the class is to have boots that protect the ankles. I went to the local bike dealer too see what kind of riding boots they have. I saw a pair of Alpine Star boots that I liked, but the size 13 was too tight (length was fine, but they just crowded my feet), and apparently do not make a size 14, or 13w. So I started wondering what everyone else wears while riding. Should I get designated riding boots? Just get something to get through the class and wear regular shoes? I'm new to the whole riding thing, and will be on here a lot asking questions.
BTW, if anyone within some kind of reasonable distance from me has a strom in silver, gray, or black that is thinking about selling, please let me know. (I saw the one for sale in San Diego, but just don't think I could deal with red...)
 

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Purpose-made boots typically have pads or thick leather on top of the toes where the shifter hits, and they also seldom have laces. Laces tend to get caught on foot pegs, shifters, and brake levers at inconvenient times. I wear "Combat Boots" when I ride to work simply because they are comfortable, but I keep the laces where they won't cause problems. I also have some Alpine Stars Web Goretex boots and some Sidi M2 boots. They provide better protection but at the cost of being rather stiff to walk in.
 

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Find some comfortable footwear that protects your ankles. You have to be able to walk after you get to yoru destination.
 

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I wear Timberland work boots in "black" to match the rest of my gear. I tuck in the laces to keep them from getting into things. While they are not "official" riding boots, its alot better then the sneakers and flip flops I see other people riding in. Though they cost about the same as motorcycle boots, these are nice in that I can wear them around any other day when I'm not riding.

Don't get boots that cramp you, but that fit nicely. You don't want your feet hurting you while you are riding.

Good luck in your MSF course... you will learn a lot..
 

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Sounds like you take a 13 wide?

There are only three wide boots that I know of and I've looked.

Daytona RoadStar GTX about $400
Sidi Vertigo Mega about $400
Sidi Mega Way about $225

I have the Daytonas and they're superb: comfortable and have CE-approved armor. Crashed in them and walked away - that's good.



If your budget doesn't accommodate those, police "duty" boots are available that are waterproof and come in a wide range of sizes starting at less than $100.

Prior to having motorcycle boots I wore Danner Fort Lewis boots, for as one wag said "You can take the man out of the infantry but you can't take the infantry out of the man." But they leak after riding 30+ minutes in driving rain - maybe not an issue where you live.
 

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Don't expect tight boots to stretch or mold to your feet. All-leather boots might, but M/C boots are mostly man-made materials, and won't stretch much.

For most of my 40 years of riding I used leather hi-top basketball shoes or work boots. I had to learn the hard way about laces hanging up in the pegs/shifter, but in all those years it only happened a couple of times.

Currently I wear military desert boots (tan combat boots) only because they are so comfortable--they are not waterproof in the slightest. I would love to have comfortable M/C boots, but as yet I have never found any at any price. My feet are 14EW and I just don't see any out there. And after several significant pile-ups I haven't had a foot injury.

Use common sense--it will take you a long way. Its preferable to use a specifically designed boot, but if you use something else it won't kill you.
 

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I wear Altama police combat boots, and have been very happy with them both for comfort and protection. The style I have retails for about $140, but I have seen them and similar on clearance from places like lapolicegear.com for much less. They aren't waterproof, but a good spritz with waterproofing spray makes them stay dry in a light rain. As noted by others, watch the laces. I always make sure mine are tucked into the top of my boots or zipped securely under my riding armor pants.
 

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So I'm taking the MSF course in a few weeks, and cannot wait to get on a strom afterwards (thinking about the 650 abs). Part of the requirement of the class is to have boots that protect the ankles. I went to the local bike dealer too see what kind of riding boots they have. I saw a pair of Alpine Star boots that I liked, but the size 13 was too tight (length was fine, but they just crowded my feet), and apparently do not make a size 14, or 13w. So I started wondering what everyone else wears while riding. Should I get designated riding boots? Just get something to get through the class and wear regular shoes? I'm new to the whole riding thing, and will be on here a lot asking questions.
BTW, if anyone within some kind of reasonable distance from me has a strom in silver, gray, or black that is thinking about selling, please let me know. (I saw the one for sale in San Diego, but just don't think I could deal with red...)
My recommendation, for what it’s worth:
For the MSF course you can get by with blue jeans, sunglasses, light gloves, light jacket, and a pair of boots that you already own. Only buy motorcycle gear after you have really done your research and thought about what you will use on a regular basis. The gear, luggage, tools, etc. get to be expensive.
I do recommend good boots for when you get out on the road. They are the only safety equipment that I have "used" so far.
 

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MSF vs. Real Life

In the MSF course, you're not gonna have the bike over 20 mph. Even then, the times people drop the bikes, they're generally near a complete stop. So when the MSF says to wear long pants, long sleeved shirt, gloves and boots to cover your ankle, it's really only a token gesture and could perhaps prevent you from getting sunburn or a scratch if you hit the ground at 2 mph.

Riding on the streets is different though. You've got people coming at you, cutting you off, you're negotiating corners at much higher speeds with the risk of a sandy apex... it is not a controlled environment, and your chances of crashing at high speed are good. That being said, I would just wear what you've got for the course as long as it meets their "covers the ankles" standard. After that, get yourself some good riding boots. This is not an item on which to short yourself. The #1 most common type of injuries in motorcycle accidents are those to the ankles (see the Hurt report). As nice as combat boots are to ride in, and a sturdy as they feel, they will not keep a 400lb+ motorcycle from snapping your tibia and fibula like a KitKat bar when the time comes.

Okay... I'm preaching, sorry. It's an occupational hazard when you make your living x-raying the unlucky/unprepared guys in an ER. Either way, good luck finding your size. It looks like you're approaching everything very responsibly and I applaud you for that.

Here's a few threads with some good boot info:
http://www.stromtrooper.com/forums/showthread.php?t=19754
http://www.stromtrooper.com/showthread.php?t=41491
http://www.stromtrooper.com/showthread.php?t=37887
 

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So I'm taking the MSF course in a few weeks, and cannot wait to get on a strom afterwards (thinking about the 650 abs). Part of the requirement of the class is to have boots that protect the ankles. I went to the local bike dealer too see what kind of riding boots they have. I saw a pair of Alpine Star boots that I liked, but the size 13 was too tight (length was fine, but they just crowded my feet), and apparently do not make a size 14, or 13w. So I started wondering what everyone else wears while riding. Should I get designated riding boots? Just get something to get through the class and wear regular shoes? I'm new to the whole riding thing, and will be on here a lot asking questions.
BTW, if anyone within some kind of reasonable distance from me has a strom in silver, gray, or black that is thinking about selling, please let me know. (I saw the one for sale in San Diego, but just don't think I could deal with red...)

Though I had been riding for a while before I took the course last year I just had a cheap pair of work boots that I wore for the course and for most of my riding. I just purchase a dedicated boot, the TSX Airtech. I was torn between this and the shorty boots but I got these at a deep discount. Size is an issue when looking for boots. I wear a 13 and hardly anyone stocks them. I tried on several styles on in a 12 just to get a feel of how the boot might fit. Surprisingly the Airtech's run big (very uncommon) and a 12/46 fit perfect.

Heed my instructors comments when you finish the course...."you are now qualified to ride 20 mph in a parking lot".

Good Luck,
T
 

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I wear Timberland work boots in "black" to match the rest of my gear. I tuck in the laces to keep them from getting into things. While they are not "official" riding boots, its alot better then the sneakers and flip flops I see other people riding in. Though they cost about the same as motorcycle boots, these are nice in that I can wear them around any other day when I'm not riding.

Don't get boots that cramp you, but that fit nicely. You don't want your feet hurting you while you are riding.

Good luck in your MSF course... you will learn a lot..
There were people in the class that I took who wore Basketball sneakers that covered the ankles. anything that covers the ankle is good enough for the class. Take your time looking around for boots. Like cdherlis said, you don't need your feet hurting while riding.

I also wear the timberland boots. I haven't found comfortable riding boots yet.
 

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I wear combat style boots - generally they are better quality and probably better protection than cheap to midrange bike boots and are just plain better value for money.
More durable, more waterproof, more comfortable.

There are good very expensive bike boots, but even those suck badly riding adventure type bikes, particularly if you do any walking.

If you ride competitive MX or ride the Paris-Dakar maybe better boots might make a difference, but boots that actually work well and where you aren't fumbling for the brake or shifter because they are too stiff or bulky are less likely to cause an accident in the first place.

From personal experience though - you *DO* need ankle protection, lose the skin off your ankle bone and it hurts like hell for weeks.

Pete
 

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I too have big wide feet

At 6-3, I have 12W feet and it's tough buying shoes. I wear Keen Hiking Boots most of the time, but I recently had to put my foot down quick and the lace got stuck on something. Almost dropped the bike. So, make sure the laces are stuck in or covered over with something like waders. I'll be shopping for boots for xmas.
 

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Boots

Not sure if you can get them in the states but check out rossiboots.com.au . An Aussie company they have some nice boots maybe try the 811 vision sizes 6-14 fullsizes only they make great work boots so I dont see why the bike boots wont be as comfy:cool:
 

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I bought some $20 hiking boots with padded ankles for my MSF course, and they actually protected my ankle in a later tipover the first day I got my bike. I rode with them for several months. Nowadays, I have a strong preference for mc-specific boots with hard ankle protection. In a tipover, the bike will come down on your ankle. That said, I have an $80 of Nitro Metro boots and a pair of Altama waterproof patrol boots. The latter actually suck as mc boots - I can feel the shifter on the top of my foot (hurst after a while), they have no ankle protection, and they are not actually waterproof. But, they will do until I get the $$$ for some OnRoads.
 
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