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Discussion Starter #1
I need to tap the general collective on shimming valves. I am at 15,000 miles and doing my valve adjustments. The exhaust were all at .2 so I shimmed them back to where they should be. The intake valves are all about .127, should I adjust them as well or call it good and start bolting it all back together? How likely are they to tighten and I end up wishing I had done them as well as long as I had the bike apart?
 

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I just checked my Suzi shop manual for my '13 650. Specs are intake: 0.10 - 0.20mm (.004-.008 in) exhaust 0.20 - 0.30 mm (.008-.012 in). If your specs are the same on your '17, then you are at the lower third of the spec. As a general rule, I like to set my clearances at the midpoint of the spec - but thats just me. Were I doing my bike, and if I had to adjust the exhausts, then doing the intakes would not be much additional work, and I would do it now and rest easier. I'm sure a lot of guys would not bother, the valves are, after all, within tolerance.
 

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Me I would move them all out to maximum.

Loose valves are happy valves.
 

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My rule is that if I go in and any need adjustment I shim them all. My target is exhaust to the wide limit (0.3mm) and intakes at mid-range (0.15mm) or a little wider. My rationale is that after valvetrain break-in (first ~5000 miles) the valves won't move much and the exhausts will move faster than the intakes so this will maximize the mileage between clearance checks. I did my 2014 Wee last December with 7000 miles and I probably won't check again till 40-50K miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I went ahead and moved all of the valves, this better suits my “thorough” personality. That rear valve chain tensioner is a real pain in the backside to get at.
 

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I went ahead and moved all of the valves, this better suits my “thorough” personality. That rear valve chain tensioner is a real pain in the backside to get at.
That's what I do too. As far as the tensioner, with the proper extensions and some electrical tape on the Universal joint swivel to limit it's "floppy-ness" I found it to be pretty easy as long as you have good light to see wtf you are doing. I know I look like a dork, but now when I work on stuff I wear a really good headlamp, and my new favorite is the Fenix usb rechargeable Li-Ion 500 lumen:

https://www.fenixlighting.com/produ...iD69slcwU_dx8-B82N6YRNIMVI-lOKUQaAsl9EALw_wcB

The light barrel rotates in a sleeve, so beam height/angle is infinitely adjustable.
 

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The tape idea on the universal joint to reduce the range of motion is a good one.

Take off the back tire, you can actually see the tensioner!
 
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Might as well do it while the engine is open.
 
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Take off the back tire, you can actually see the tensioner!
My previous bike was a Gen1 Wee (2007 with ABS) and I found that with a really looooong extension (~4ft) there is a clean, straight shot to the tensioner bolt (i.e. no swivel connector needed) so the socket wrench extends past the rear tire. So it is possible to reach it without pulling the tire and no swivel even on an ABS model. However, I did have to borrow some socket extensions from my neighbor. My current bike is a Gen2 Wee (2014 with ABS) and the aim or angle to the tensioner bolt for a clean shot is different. With about 2-3ft of extensions the socket wrench exits just under the swingarm near the rear caliper. Again no removing the tire or using a swivel but it was up on the center stand. I don't know if this applies to the Gen3 bikes but I suspect it would work.

In either case, the biggest pain of removing the rear tensioner bolt is getting the threads started against the spring without crossing up the threads. It is so hard to reach and get the threads started either by hand or with 3-4ft of socket extensions. So what I did here was that I only backed off the bolt 10 full turns without removing it completely. On my K7 I could count full turns because the socket wrench extended past the rear tire but on my L4 I counted 40 1/4 turns because the socket wrench would not do full turns due to interference with the swingarm and exhaust but achieved the same result. Backing off the bolt released enough pressure on the spring that I was able to release the pawl mechanism to loosen the cam chain to free the cams with the bolt in place. Buttoning up was easy because the bolt was already started in the threads.
 

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If it ain't broke, don't fix it. If it's in spec, it's in spec. I wouldn't touch them. If Suzuki put the spec at .130, then I'd reshim them. Suzuki did not.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I have a 17+ wee. There is not a clean shot to the tensioner bolt with or without the rear tire. The biggest issue is getting the bolt started again as there is very limited room to get your hand in there. Next time, I will try to release the tensioner with the bolt still in place. That definitely is worth the attempt.
 

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What I have found that works for me.
A long extension with a universal joint on the end that's been taped so it barely moves.
Stuff something into the socket so the bolt head is barely into the socket.
Have a helper drive the ratchet while I guide the socket and bolt.
Me and my SO have done this a few times now and we've gotten pretty good at it.
 

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Agree...I don't take the tensioner all the way out...at least not on purpose. Loosen, then use a along skinny screw driver to release the pawl while pulling up on the chain.
 
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