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Discussion Starter #1
So, let me start by saying that I stole this idea from a comment someone else made here recently,but wanted to post up something I tried that worked well for me.

At 15,000 miles, I had the same crappy low-RPM, low speed driveability that almost everyone complains about. The bike wasn't happy trolling along at 50-55 or so in 5th or 6th gear (even with a 1 tooth smaller front sprocket) unless the RPMs were in the sweet spot 4000 or above. I always had it in the back of my mind that even my temperamental, comparatively high strung RC51 putted along more smoothly than my Vee. I figured that there may be more to it than the lean spot, TB sync fixes that we have all tried and definitely help.

With the bike on the center stand, I could grab the rear chain/sprocket, and move it about 1/2" forward & back. Riding the bike, you can see how the power pulses from a v-twin at low revs and that slop could cause the sprocket to hammer back and forth against the rubber cushions.

What I did was to very simply pull the rear wheel, remove the sprocket/sprocket carrier, and cut rubber shims out of an old inner tube to place between the outside of each cushion and its pocket in the hub. 10 shims in all. Essentially, you are just squeezing the "c" shaped cushions closed a bit so that the sprocket carrier fits more snugly inside them.



The improvement is amazing. I'm not talking about chugging along like a cruiser at 1500 RPMs, but now on a smooth, flat stretch of road, I can click into 6th gear without the bike protesting.

Well worth the 30 minutes and $0 investment.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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For less worn cush drives not allowing inner tube rubber to fit, sheet aluminum shims will work.
 

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Awww maaaan....

I just had the rear wheel off like 3 days ago...

I am not going to pull it again until I have the convenience of a center stand (on my birthday wish list...my birthday is in Aug...I can hope...) but this may just be worth the trouble when I do get the wheel off next time.
 

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I googled it after finding this thread, and apparently it is a pretty well known mod on other cush drive bikes. Picked up some good ideas for other shim materials:

Plastic for sale signs
Milk Jugs
Lids from butter container
Flexible cutting board material

I am sure the list could go on and on.
 

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Any pics of how you inserted the shims for us that just cant picture it in our minds?
Mike
 

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Price of cush drive inserts?

At 15,000 miles, equivalent to five trips across the USA, why not just replace the rubber inserts? It's easier than adding shims. Note that I haven't priced the inserts so I'm guessing they're pretty expensive, in which case I can understand the shims. I'm as cheap as the next guy.
 

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As I sit here drinking a beer, I think to myself "beer is pretty useful!"
 

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What Kinda Bike Is That?
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At 15,000 miles, equivalent to five trips across the USA, why not just replace the rubber inserts? It's easier than adding shims. Note that I haven't priced the inserts so I'm guessing they're pretty expensive, in which case I can understand the shims. I'm as cheap as the next guy.
It's not that expensive to do. HERE.

Mine were pretty worn, so I opted to go with new. If I were in a pickle, which is most of the time, I wouldn't hesitate to shove any of the materials listed above, into the system.

B.
 

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I didn't replace or shim until 45k miles (DL650). At that point, I did the replacements and new rear axle bearings.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
At 15,000 miles, equivalent to five trips across the USA, why not just replace the rubber inserts? It's easier than adding shims. Note that I haven't priced the inserts so I'm guessing they're pretty expensive, in which case I can understand the shims. I'm as cheap as the next guy.
Yes, it's easier to just replace the $8 x 5 cushions, assuming you have them on hand or your dealer is nearby and stocks such things (mine isn't and doesn't). It was sort of a beer-drinking brainstorming session and I wanted to see how it would work. I will probably make it a point to have them on hand the next time I change the rear tire.
 

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At 15,000 miles, equivalent to five trips across the USA, why not just replace the rubber inserts? It's easier than adding shims. Note that I haven't priced the inserts so I'm guessing they're pretty expensive, in which case I can understand the shims. I'm as cheap as the next guy.
They are $7 each, for a total of $35 + tax etc.

Well worth the price, IMO.
 

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I had to replace my rear wheel bearings along with the sprocket hub bearing.

My absorbers were pretty worn, (hub would fall out with the wheel still vertical)

and the bike only had 17k on the clock(02'dl) I thought about shims but new

absorbers were about $8 each, so I went with new. With the wheel off I went ahead

and modified my spacers to better align the sprockets. My shifts after the mods

were noticeably improved.
 

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Well I shimmed up the rubbers with pieces of cut up bicycle tube, and then I had to pound the carrier in with a rubber mallet. :mrgreen: Considering the carrier would pretty much fall out with the tire vertical before I did this, I would have to say this was a worthwhile redneck engineering project. I did notice that my rear bearings are feeling a bit rough, so next time the wheel comes off I am putting sealed bearings in. Curious to see if this will help with a few issues I am noticing lately, test ride tomorrow is in order.
 

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2007 Vee

My bike is getting new cushings later this week; it's got 138,000km so I figure the original set worked very well.
 

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Here's something to consider when installing new cushions. If you can get your hands on some RRG(red rubber grease), use it sparingly on the new cushions after you clean the hub pockets thoroughly. The RRG is a rubber protectant that will allow the cushions to resist the normal wear of putting them in dry. If no RRG is handy, di-electric grease will work Protectant 2000 will also but won't last as long.
 

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Here's something to consider when installing new cushions. If you can get your hands on some RRG(red rubber grease), use it sparingly on the new cushions after you clean the hub pockets thoroughly. The RRG is a rubber protectant that will allow the cushions to resist the normal wear of putting them in dry. If no RRG is handy, di-electric grease will work Protectant 2000 will also but won't last as long.
Not sure that is a good idea, the rubbers are supposed to wear. You want them dry and tacky, I would imagine making them more slick could be counterproductive. Is this something you already do, and if so what are your experiences by doing that?
 
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