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Hey - it's a choice thing, and something us moderators are having difficulty convincing VS that action is necessary. We are the product they are selling and the Arena is so much busier now that, in spite of the many complaints, VS can surely see the increased post count data.

Vstroming's link brings up a whole lot of resealing options. The Time Cert is obviously the problem here. ++ TIME-SERT Official Threaded inserts for stripped threads, blown out sparkplugs,
 

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If I was going to go with a quickie JB Weld solution for this, I think I'd modify it from the method described here. Rather than just JB Welding over the existing drain bolt to seal it from being used, I think I'd first try to find a nut that fit the threads on the existing oil drain bolt, and JB Weld that to the area over the existing drain hole. Naturally you'd want to build up a nice pyramid of the JB Weld around the nut. Once the JB Weld sets, you basically have an extended threaded drain plug hole that you can screw the drain bolt into, and you could still use the drain plug like you always did. If the nut made the drain plug stick out too far, you could saw a section off the nut with a hacksaw to make it lower.

I've used a lot of JB Weld, and it's pretty strong. If you apply it to clean surfaces and build up enough of it around the nut, I don't think the amount of torque you should be applying to a drain bolt would ever break the nut loose. If you ultimately decided to use a Time Sert, you could just grind the JB Weld off with a Dremel, knock the nut off, and put the Time Sert in.
 

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If I was going to go with a quickie JB Weld solution for this, I think I'd modify it from the method described here. Rather than just JB Welding over the existing drain bolt to seal it from being used, I think I'd first try to find a nut that fit the threads on the existing oil drain bolt, and JB Weld that to the area over the existing drain hole. Naturally you'd want to build up a nice pyramid of the JB Weld around the nut. Once the JB Weld sets, you basically have an extended threaded drain plug hole that you can screw the drain bolt into, and you could still use the drain plug like you always did. If the nut made the drain plug stick out too far, you could saw a section off the nut with a hacksaw to make it lower.

I've used a lot of JB Weld, and it's pretty strong. If you apply it to clean surfaces and build up enough of it around the nut, I don't think the amount of torque you should be applying to a drain bolt would ever break the nut loose. If you ultimately decided to use a Time Sert, you could just grind the JB Weld off with a Dremel, knock the nut off, and put the Time Sert in.
Going this route the FIRST thing (before applying the JB Weld) would be to put the drain bolt sealing washer on the bolt, then thread the bolt & washer into the new nut and tighten, THEN thread the whole lot into the oil pan so the threads are "synchronized".

Cheers,
Glenn
 

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I had a klr with this problem, and i can tell you that self tapping oversised plugs failed, expandable plugs failed, the time sert failed... during my research i heard of old timers wrapping the threads of a plug in copper wire to help the seal. There is of course jb weld, only if you can get the surface clean and dry ( like tip the bike on its side or remove the engine), and pumping out the oil from the fill port or clutch port, whatever you like (those cheap drill attachment pumps with some tubing are hard to beat pricewise). You could take it to a machine shop and im sure they could fix it. If youve already tried a time sert, if memory serves, see if the threads on the insert are leaking or the new drain plug, it might just new a new washer as someone may have already suggested. Sometimes you can go up a size on the time sert if im remembering right. I do remember getting pretty tired of hearing "hey your bikes marking its territory again", so i feel your pain. Good luck with it
 

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I would need to be confident that the leak was not between the Time Sert and the case before applying any JB Weld.
 

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Why would you need to remove the engine or lay the bike on its side in order to apply JB Weld?
Because the oil drain sits at the lowest point for obvious reasons, and (cold) oil doesn't flow well on gravity alone. So oil will continue dripping out of the drain hole for days, but you need a clean surface for the JB Weld. Taking the engine out and laying the engine on its side, or laying the whole bike on its side after draining the oil, ensures that the drain stays clear of oil.

But now that I'm thinking about it... Obviously you drain the oil first with the bike upright, so there is (virtually) no oil in the bike anymore that can migrate to places where you don't want it (e.g airbox). You then lay the bike on its side, on something soft to prevent scratches. But is there any other damage that you need to prevent?

For instance, would it be wise to drain the coolant beforehand? If you lay the bike on the left side, the coolant overflow reservoir will be the highest point in the cooling system, and there are no other coolant outlets, so it should be OK, should it?
 

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Hey check out this site.
I found it by accident and keep it IN CASE I ever have a need.
It seems like a good fix for this kind of thing!
 

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Because the oil drain sits at the lowest point for obvious reasons, and (cold) oil doesn't flow well on gravity alone. So oil will continue dripping out of the drain hole for days, but you need a clean surface for the JB Weld. Taking the engine out and laying the engine on its side, or laying the whole bike on its side after draining the oil, ensures that the drain stays clear of oil.

But now that I'm thinking about it... Obviously you drain the oil first with the bike upright, so there is (virtually) no oil in the bike anymore that can migrate to places where you don't want it (e.g airbox). You then lay the bike on its side, on something soft to prevent scratches. But is there any other damage that you need to prevent?

For instance, would it be wise to drain the coolant beforehand? If you lay the bike on the left side, the coolant overflow reservoir will be the highest point in the cooling system, and there are no other coolant outlets, so it should be OK, should it?
I think drain the oil, let it sit overnight, then put on sidestand or even put a tire up on a 2x4 and then on the sidestand ought to be enough. Cleaning it then should do it.

Cheers,
Glenn
 

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Because the oil drain sits at the lowest point for obvious reasons, and (cold) oil doesn't flow well on gravity alone. So oil will continue dripping out of the drain hole for days, but you need a clean surface for the JB Weld. Taking the engine out and laying the engine on its side, or laying the whole bike on its side after draining the oil, ensures that the drain stays clear of oil.

But now that I'm thinking about it... Obviously you drain the oil first with the bike upright, so there is (virtually) no oil in the bike anymore that can migrate to places where you don't want it (e.g airbox). You then lay the bike on its side, on something soft to prevent scratches. But is there any other damage that you need to prevent?

For instance, would it be wise to drain the coolant beforehand? If you lay the bike on the left side, the coolant overflow reservoir will be the highest point in the cooling system, and there are no other coolant outlets, so it should be OK, should it?
I can't imagine going to that much trouble. If you're going to do the "JB Weld a nut to the sump" method I described, I would simply:

Clean the area around the drain plug. At this point, the only area that really needs to be clean is the small point where the nut contacts the sump. If it's still dripping once every couple minutes, no problem. Then thread the oil drain bolt into the new nut that you're about to JB Weld to the sump. You can even put a crush washer on and snug the bolt into the nut so it seals. Apply a bead of fast setting gel superglue (like ZAP) to the face of the nut that will be against the sump. Wipe off any oil off the area around the drain hole that might have dripped out since you cleaned it, put the nut in place, and let the superglue set. If you spray it with accelerator it'll set instantly. By the time the oil might drip again, the nut is set in place, the superglue will hold it there and form a seal against any oil leaking out from between the sump and the nut. The oil drain bolt keeps if from leaking out of the nut. Now that the hole is blocked, you can spray solvent around the area where you're going to apply the JB Weld and get that clean. The superglue also holds the nut in place while you apply the JB Weld. If you mix the JB Weld and wait about 15 minutes or so, it'll thicken up to the point that it wont sag, so it will stay in place even though it's on the side or bottom of the engine.

There are other methods to plug the drain hole while you're working on the fix that wouldn't involve removing the engine or draining all the fluids out of the bike and laying it on its side. I'd definitely try every one of them first.
 

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I can't imagine going to that much trouble. If you're going to do the "JB Weld a nut to the sump" method I described, I would simply:

Clean the area around the drain plug. At this point, the only area that really needs to be clean is the small point where the nut contacts the sump. If it's still dripping once every couple minutes, no problem. Then thread the oil drain bolt into the new nut that you're about to JB Weld to the sump. You can even put a crush washer on and snug the bolt into the nut so it seals. Apply a bead of fast setting gel superglue (like ZAP) to the face of the nut that will be against the sump. Wipe off any oil off the area around the drain hole that might have dripped out since you cleaned it, put the nut in place, and let the superglue set. If you spray it with accelerator it'll set instantly. By the time the oil might drip again, the nut is set in place, the superglue will hold it there and form a seal against any oil leaking out from between the sump and the nut. The oil drain bolt keeps if from leaking out of the nut. Now that the hole is blocked, you can spray solvent around the area where you're going to apply the JB Weld and get that clean. The superglue also holds the nut in place while you apply the JB Weld. If you mix the JB Weld and wait about 15 minutes or so, it'll thicken up to the point that it wont sag, so it will stay in place even though it's on the side or bottom of the engine.

There are other methods to plug the drain hole while you're working on the fix that wouldn't involve removing the engine or draining all the fluids out of the bike and laying it on its side. I'd definitely try every one of them first.
Ive never really tried any sort of superglue when jb welding, or really even done a ton of jbwelding on motors. The few times ive attempted it and failed, the culprit was just a scosh of oil still seeping. The area has to be clean beyond clean, and dry. Easyest way is to lay the bike over after draining, ive found. Doesnt the glue melt off or soften up when the motor heats up (not fully cured before jb is set on it?), or crack and split? Dont know if I'd trust it without a little experimentation, just seems like an extra possible point of failure. If its worked for you, what type of glue did you use? Did you use regular 24 hour set jb?
 

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It doesn't matter if the super glue melts, as it's purpose isn't to hold the nut on permanently. It's simply there to hold the nut to the sump so you can stop whatever minor drips of oil might be coming out of the drain hole. Once the JB Weld cured, the super glue isn't necessary any more. As for the JB Weld, cured JB weld can withstand a constant temperature of 500 degrees, and a maximum temperature of 600 degrees for 10 minutes. The area around the sump isn't going to get anywhere near that hot.

If there was too much oil still dripping out for whatever reason and the super glue wouldn't adhere, I'd take a small piece of shop rag, ball it up, and then put it into the cut off corner of a freezer bag. Tie off the the end with some sturdy string, and leave it long enough so you can grab it. Stick that into the drain hole to block and remaining oil from dripping. Now you can clean the sump until it's sparkling, and then glue the nut onto the sump and continue. Thread the string through the nut so you can grab it. Once the JB Weld is applied and cured, pull the plug out of the drain hole and through the nut, and put the drain bolt in.

I've used JB Weld a lot in my fabrication projects. I've never done this specific type of repair. I suggested it mainly as an alternative to JB Welding the drain bolt into the sump than then having to use a pump through the oil filler port in order to drain the oil. It's not a repair I would do myself, as I'd opt for a Time Sert. But if I had to get the bike fixed and JB Weld was my only alternative, I'd try the method I described first. If it didn't work, then I'd just JB Weld the drain bolt in place and resign myself to pumping out my oil during oil changes. And I'd definitely try this method before I drained all the fluid out if the bike and layed the bike on it's side, or removed the engine.
 
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