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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Trying to get all parts in place. Based on others opinions, decided on the 412 rubber valve stem replacements. Finding online but they are listed as Designed for rim holes 11.5 (.453 dia)

1) Thought we need 11.3?

Napa has them but listed at .88 with .453 dia rim hole. Tire Valve Stems Snap-In Valve PART #
NTH 90412

2) So this is the recommended shorty?

3) Already have dyna-beads installed. Better to recover and reuse or go with ride-on for balancing?

4) 06 Wee, 35,000, do I need to do any wheel bearing replacement or clean n lube? No off road almost zero wet
 

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Sorry but I use the local Power Sports store and they charge $25 bucks for a tire change and occasionally change my valve stem.
My bike is at 90K miles. When I take the tire off for replacement I give the bearings a spin and if it doesn't feel gritty, I ignore it again.
The dealer puts balance weights on and I never give it a thought.
 

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1 & 2) Yes, that Napa valve stem is correct. Any 412 valve stem will work fine. They're made of rubber, so the exact measurements given in the specs are sometimes a little imprecise.

You can also use a 413 valve stem -- these are much easier to find almost anywhere, even Walmart. The only difference is that they're 1/4" longer. 412 stems make it slightly easier to check tire pressure and look a little nicer.

3) No idea. I static balance. The beads are sort of a pain in the ass that go everywhere, IMHO, but some people like 'em. I hear you can recover them by using a piece of pantyhose over the nozzle of a shop vac and slurping them up.

4) You replace wheel bearings when they need to be replaced. It's impossible to go by mileage. What kills motorcycle wheel bearings is abuse and contamination. Motorcycle wheel bearings are basically standard sealed metric industrial bearings -- they're engineered for very high speeds and loads in machinery. In motorcycles, they're very lightly loaded, but they can be vulnerable to water and dirt.

Stick your finger into the bearing and spin the inner part around. If it feels loose or like it's got sand in it, replace. A little bit notchy is normal -- you should be able to turn it easily with your finger. I recommend keeping a set of wheel bearings in your garage so you're ready to replace them when the time comes. At around 30,000 miles, your odds are good they're OK unless you've been bombing through mud bogs and rivers and blasting the wheel hubs with a pressure washer.
 

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I recover balance beads after I dismount the tire from the wheel. I cut the side out of a plastic bottle leaving part of the bottom intact. Its curved so it contours to the tire interior. Once off the wheel, stand the tire upright and scoop out the beads.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
1) Got the Shinko's. Way different tread pattern, should I leave the battle wing in front with Shinko in the rear, does the differing treads matter

2) Tires have red dots, no yellow, what does that mean for install?

Did check the dates, 46 month 2016 rear 5th month 2017 front, always check date, once had "new" auto tires almost 4 years old, no way to verify how they were stored
 

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1) Got the Shinko's. Way different tread pattern, should I leave the battle wing in front with Shinko in the rear, does the differing treads matter

2) Tires have red dots, no yellow, what does that mean for install?

Did check the dates, 46 month 2016 rear 5th month 2017 front, always check date, once had "new" auto tires almost 4 years old, no way to verify how they were stored
I have that combination on my bike right now; a 705 in the back and a BW501 in front. The differing treads don't make any difference in how it handles. The only thing that's noticeable is that the rear tire is a little more buzzy than the BW502. When the BW501 wears out, I'll put a Shinko on, but only because I like the Shinkos and they're cheap.

I'm getting more and more inclined to Kelly2012's point of view about balancing motorcycle tires. I do it out of habit because I've always done it, but I'm not sure it's even necessary. The only reason I keep doing it is I'd hate to skip it and find out the the tire needed it, and have to take the damn tire off again. Even when they are perfectly balanced, how long does the balance even last, once the rubber starts to wear off? It would be an interesting experiment to take a balanced tire off a bike when it had lost half its tread, and see if it was actually still balanced.

I might be mistaken, but I think the yellow dot is the heavy spot of the tire, and the red dot indicates the highest point of the tire.
 

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I'll always replace any ball bearings that feel notchy in any way. Somewhere on here are the industrial bearing numbers that fit in correctly. They'll be pre-lubed with long life grease and have resilient seals on both sides to keep dirt & water out and the grease in. The -2RS suffix on the bearing indicates the two seals. (Shielded bearings are different and not sealed.)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
So red dot only, what do I do with that?

Can't find any info from Shinko, random stuff online red dot equals the light spot?
 

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Well, you can do what I did and just line the red dot up with the valve stem when you mount it. I wouldn't get too worried about stuff like this. You'll find others on the forum who don't balance motorcycle tires at all, regardless of red dots and yellow dots. My new Shinko's been on the bike for about 150 miles now, and it's running just fine with the red dot being used as a balancing reference.
 

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I'll always replace any ball bearings that feel notchy in any way. Somewhere on here are the industrial bearing numbers that fit in correctly. They'll be pre-lubed with long life grease and have resilient seals on both sides to keep dirt & water out and the grease in. The -2RS suffix on the bearing indicates the two seals. (Shielded bearings are different and not sealed.)
Bearings:
Front Wheel: 6203-2RS
Rear Wheel: 6204-2RS
Sprocket Carrier: 62/32-2RS

Best place to buy bearings is your local bearing shop, and always buy quality. I have had good experiences with Nachi, and bad experiences with cheap Chinese rebrands like All Balls. They're all cheap, so there's no reason to be frugal here. And be sure to install them properly - don't ever hit the inner race.

edit: And while you're messing with the rear wheel, check the condition of the cush drive rubbers. If the sprocket carrier falls out of the hub from gravity, they are worn and this can allow the carrier to tilt, damaging both the bearing and your chain/sprockets. You can shim the cush drive with strips of plastic (the kind used in margarine tubs works well) or old inner tube. By 40,000 miles, my sprocket carrier bearing and cush drive rubbers were toast. The stock carrier bearing is only sealed on one side, so if you ride a lot in the rain, it is particularly susceptible.
 

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The Rim needs to be balanced, and then the rim/tire combination. I read that tires are very precise these days so if your RIM is OK, then you should be fine without balancing. My current set of TKC-70's did not need balancing either.

I don't balance my motorcycle tires any more. Can't feel the difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
:var_6:
So the rubber stem shorties I ordered
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01MTGDI4Y?ref_=pe_623860_70668520

All reviews are for anything but a motorcycle, these good?
Would metal be better, or for these low profile doesn't matter

I've got old dynabeads in there now, never had any vibration tire problem ever. Probably has nothing to do with the beads.

Red dot to valve stem as recommended and no balancing, no beads then maybe add Ride-on if needed, see how it goes
 

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Trying to get all parts in place. Based on others opinions, decided on the 412 rubber valve stem replacements. Finding online but they are listed as Designed for rim holes 11.5 (.453 dia)

1) Thought we need 11.3?

Napa has them but listed at .88 with .453 dia rim hole. Tire Valve Stems Snap-In Valve PART #
NTH 90412

2) So this is the recommended shorty?

3) Already have dyna-beads installed. Better to recover and reuse or go with ride-on for balancing?

4) 06 Wee, 35,000, do I need to do any wheel bearing replacement or clean n lube? No off road almost zero wet
3)You can try to recover if you feel so inclined. I usually static balance but went with Ride on this last tire change because my tire balancer was still in .gov packup from my move. It added a pretty significant cost compared to 1/4oz wheel weights so now that I have my packup I'll be going back to a static balance instead of trying to retrieve those tiny little beads out of the old tire.

4)unless they feel like there's sand in them I wouldn't sweat them. I'm currently at about 74k miles on original wheel bearings.
 

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I don't balance my tyres. I have never noticed any issues regarding handling or wear.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I didn't get the Napa stems, local store didn't have them, but from amazon, .453 but the seller says no to motorcycle tires

"No theses are oversized for racing wheels" was their response,

wait what????
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Using the motion pro bead breaker, it worked, but it was much harder then the video, I think what brand/type tire you are dealing with makes a huge difference.

Installing the 705 Shinko rear tire, was much easier then removing the old battle wing rear. I still had a tough time getting the tire on. Was using a lot of force, I was sure I was going to damage the tire. The last bit, no way to get in a rim protector, so I ended up scratching the rims, will re-touch later.

Also it was very difficult to push down on the tire, wouldn't give, plenty of lube and the tire was in the sun for awhile. I needed another person to help. I might look in to a harbor freight type mounter

The Wheel dampers broke off when I tried to take them out, the bike is 11 years old, so probably time to replace them anyway. I did try to ease them out.

The rotor has some groves in it, can that be machined smooth, or better to replace it
 

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That rotor doesn't look too bad just from the picture. I don't think you will be able to get it machined. Replacement is usually the only choice for bike discs. I think you'll find you get better at changing tires the more tires you do. It seems to me that some tires just humble you and others seem to jump on the rim. Search for "Stubbies" tire levers. They are made from a polymer and won't scratch your rims.
 
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As far as balancing goes, when I changed the rear tire on the Strom for the first time, I checked the balance of the rim by without the tire on it. Strange thing is the heavy side was not where the valve stem is but about 90 degrees from there. I lined the "dot" of the tire up with the heavy side of the rim and still used one wheel weight. I think it was 2.5 oz. Doubt I ever would have noticed but it was easy enough to do since I already had the wheel removed.

I've heard theories where you can get quicker wear in one area if it is out of balance. But then again, in the 70's everyone believe in backwards satanic messages on rock albums.
 
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