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Discussion Starter #1
It's been a couple of weeks since the accident happened, so bruises and pride are just about healed. This is a particularly painful accident pride-wise as it is my first after riding for many years. I was wearing all the gear except hip pads (my next purchase after repairing the bike).

The accident - summary version: Going down a fire trail, I hit a hole between 15-30 mph and went high side. Based on the mud wiped away on the forks during compression, the shocks appear to have compressed 4 inches out of the exposed 6.25 inches. The bike rolled on wheels (I think) approximately 20 feet and fell onto the right side. It most likely slide a little on its side, but I don't know for sure. The main impact was on the right side engine guard, the right side edge of the dashboard faring, the right side Storm hand guards (with aluminum backbone), and brake pedal. The engine block shows no signs of hard impact.

There is significant damage to the rear brake pedal, the engine guard, dashboard faring, and the handle bar is no longer aligned properly. The hand guard is scratched, but otherwise does not appear to be damaged.

Field inspection/ride home shows that the only immediate concerns are the bent rear brake pedal, which renders the rear brakes practically useless, and the handle bars are not aligned. The bike was gradually increased up to interstate speeds on the ride home with no other noticeable concerns.

Long term concerns are damage to rear brakes other than the bent pedal, damage to front shocks not visible to surface inspection, and damage to handle bars other than re-aligning the bars on the triple tree. Rear brake fluid is still full after two weeks of sitting parked in the garage.

More photos following this post.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Shocks

Based on the clean area vs dirt, the shocks appear to have compressed 4 inches of the 6.25 inches of the exposed shocks. It seems the shocks worked as expected and that is that. However...is there any possible damage that would not be visible? What can I do to be sure they’re good to go? I will be bringing the bike to a mechanic for an inspection, I just want to be able to QA it myself too.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Rear Brake

The brake pedal is F’d up for sure, but what else should I check? The brake fluid level is good after sitting for two weeks. I will be bringing the bike to a mechanic to repair the pedal, but what should I be sure gets looked at in addition to the replacing the pedal (and how can I QA the rear brake after repairs)?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Handle Bars

The handle bars are not aligned. The impact area is clearly on the Storm Hand Guard - which held up very well. (I highly recommend these hand guards by the way.) Is it possible that they can be realigned by loosening the triple tree and aligning the handle bars? What other problems might I have to look for?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Handle Bars Hand Guard Impact

Handle Bars Hand Guard Impact another photo. The damage to the dashboard faring is also visible.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Stock Engine Guard Worked!

The engine guard is bent and I will probably replace it as it is now not as strong. But it did the job in this case!
 

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The forks are what we call "tweeked" Brace the left side of the front wheel against something solid, a wall or tree, and grab the bars and turn to the left until straight. It will take some pressure. Remove and straighten or replace brake pedal.
 

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The forks are what we call "tweeked" Brace the left side of the front wheel against something solid, a wall or tree, and grab the bars and turn to the left until straight. It will take some pressure. Remove and straighten or replace brake pedal.
I have just had to do this to mine after a very low speed off, but please loosen a couple of triple bolt clamps first, doesn't matter which, the top ones are easiest. Once you have eased the clamps, just do what VSrider says, then bounce the forks up and down a couple of times, re-check that the triple trees are in line with each other and re-tighten the clamp. Now you're good to go.

Note that it is possible that the handlebars are slightly bent, in which case they will still not look straight, be careful you don't use the 'de-tweeking' to get the bars looking straight when you're really compensating for a bent handlebar.

It is also possible, but in this case I would think very unlikely, that you might have a slightly bent fork tube which would also make the bars look out of alignment even though the triple clamps are good.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The forks are what we call "tweeked" Brace the left side of the front wheel against something solid, a wall or tree, and grab the bars and turn to the left until straight. It will take some pressure. Remove and straighten or replace brake pedal.
I have just had to do this to mine after a very low speed off, but please loosen a triple bolt clamp first, you only have to loosen one, doesn't matter which, one of the top ones is easiest. Once you have eased the clamp, just do what VSrider says, then bounce the forks up and down a couple of times, re-check that the triple trees are in line with each other and re-tighten the clamp. Now you're good to go.

Note that it is possible that the bars are slightly bent, in which case they will still not look straight, be careful you don't use the 'de-tweeking' to get the bars looking straight when you're really compensating for a bent handlebar.

It is also possible, but in this case I would think very unlikely, that you might have a slightly bent fork tube which would also make the bars look out of alignment even though the triple clamps are good.
Looking closely at the handle bar, I really don't think it's bent. Maybe, but I don't think so. As far as bending a fork tube goes, I'm guessing that might require some higher speeds. I wasn't going faster than 25 mph ... I think. It happened pretty fast. Bent fork tube sounds expensive, so I hope not. How can I be sure it's not a bent fork?

As far as "de-tweeking" goes - if it turns out to be that - is that something the Suzuki shop will do, or is that an unconventional repair?
 

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Straightening tweaked forks is a common DIY fix. Dirt bike riders have to do it regularly. No need to take her to the shop. There's plenty of info on Google and Youtube. Don't worry, you won't mess anything up.
 

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Like Sawdura says, but I'd loosen all 4 clamp bolts and wiggle the front tire with the handlebars gently then retighten the four clamp bolts. I just am a little wary about twisting the fork tubes inside the clamps without loosening the clamps. On the brake pedal, just take it off and clamp the pivot end in a vise, heat it up (even a cheap propane torch should do it) and bend it back into place or take it off and get a new one. The stealer will charge plenty for his or her efforts. You can do it yourself. If you don't have the tools, you can buy a lot of them for what the dealer will charge.
 

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One more opinion here on re-aligning the forks.

You should loosen the bolts on either side of the lower triple clamp, leave the top bolts tight. Then as described before, compress the forks as much as possible several times to allow the tubes to re-align the triple clamps. Then tighten the lower bolts.
 

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Looking closely at the handle bar, I really don't think it's bent.
It's bent. It doesn't take much to bend the OEM bars. You could keep riding it as is, but it will always be a little off. 7/8" handle bars are cheap, and they come in many flavors. Now is the time to get that bend (no pun intended :mrgreen:) you always wanted.

The brake pedal can be straightened, if you do it carefully. It will never be like new, but you can make it usable if you don't feel like spending the money on a new one now.

Gustavo
 

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Ditto the triple clamp advice.

My '05 brake pedal got twisted up like yours. I heated it with a propane torch and used a piece of pipe over the pedal to straighten it back out. I couldn't get it perfect, but I got it good enough that I rode it that way for another 10k miles before trading it in. You wouldn't see it unless you studied at it closely.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Here is the triple tree diagram. According to the numbers, what do I loosen to make the tweek?



Thanks to greywolf for the diagram.
 

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Bolts 8 and 10, both sides. You'll need a torque wrench to retighten them. If you loosen the bolts too much the forks may slide up or down in the triple clamps, depending on whether or not you are using a centre stand. If you run into trouble there are lots of helpful people on this forum who I'm sure will come to your assistance. Good luck,

Doug
 
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