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Discussion Starter #1
So I discovered an interesting thing about riding my Vee in the dirt the other day. I have a Wee saddle on my Vee, and have removed all the rubber bumpers on it except the front bumper that rests on the gas tank. What this does is raises the front just a tad and puts me at the back of the saddle against the uplift of the passenger pillion. This is very comfortable for the road. I'm now driving off the rear more in my cornering on the twisties and the bike feels very firmly planted.

Riding in the dirt, I stand a lot as I feel more in control. Sitting in the normal position, the bike feels "floaty" on the front and a bit loose at times in the rear. Well, standing the other day I came around a bend and into a rough section of dirt. I dropped down into the saddle to shift the bike down a gear, and landed really close to the tank. Not my normal position with this saddle. Banged the gear and worked it through the pot holes, rocks, and trenches. Realized that the bike felt in perfect balance so stayed there and started playing with it and feeling the traction and control.

What the outcome was, is that my body weight was in the same position as when I was standing. So, now I stay way forward in the dirt and have the control there. On the pavement tried the same thing and discovered the rear wanted to slide a bit. Body weight being in the "neutral" position, bike slides easier on pavement, but tracks dirt better. Sitting in the back gives better control on the street, and less in the dirt.

For me was an interesting observation. I do like having the ability to shift my sitting style to work with what type of terrain I'm riding. Neat little spin off from changing the rubber bumpers under the saddle. :thumbup:
 

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The biggest problem with off road riding a Strom is the suspension bottoming out and the subsequent jolt to the body if in the seated position. Standing will always trump sitting in that condition. Also, it pays to learn to shift while standing so you can maintain control without excess movement.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I hear you on the learning to shift while standing. Still working on that a bit and getting better. Haven't bottomed out yet, but I figure it will eventually. Getting comfortable with the braking while standing, but with my Sidi ADV boots, the shifting takes some weight shift to snake my toe under the lever. Have raised the shifter in the splines, helped a lot. Down is not bad at all, now used to that. Building the dirt skills ever so slowly....
 

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What you've experienced is what dirt-bikers commonly refer to as 'getting on the tank'...........getting more weight on the front end in the dirt is key, in certain situation. Only problem is, the Vstrom's tank is twice as long as it should be for real dirt riding, so getting forward as far as you can is a good strategy (even for 'enthusiastic' street riding). Next time you see a GP rider sticking their leg out, towards the front wheel as they approach a hard corner, it's so they can get even more weight out towards the front tire........the same principle applies.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
What you've experienced is what dirt-bikers commonly refer to as 'getting on the tank'...........getting more weight on the front end in the dirt is key, in certain situation. Only problem is, the Vstrom's tank is twice as long as it should be for real dirt riding, so getting forward as far as you can is a good strategy (even for 'enthusiastic' street riding). Next time you see a GP rider sticking their leg out, towards the front wheel as they approach a hard corner, it's so they can get even more weight out towards the front tire........the same principle applies.
Got it! Makes really good sense....:thumbup:
 
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