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Big step today. Installed the ultimate, I think, farkle. Excellent directions. Except for the fact that I kept dropping washers, nuts and other small invisible stuff into the guts of the bike, it was a very straight forward install.

I had a Scotts on my R1 track bike and NEVER had a tank slapper despite some pretty aggressive riding. I look forward to the same result on the Wee. With a fork brace and the stabilizer, it is essentially a different bike.

The whole job took 2 hours.
 

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Big step today. Installed the ultimate, I think, farkle. Excellent directions. Except for the fact that I kept dropping washers, nuts and other small invisible stuff into the guts of the bike, it was a very straight forward install.

I had a Scotts on my R1 track bike and NEVER had a tank slapper despite some pretty aggressive riding. I look forward to the same result on the Wee. With a fork brace and the stabilizer, it is essentially a different bike.

The whole job took 2 hours.
Forgive the ignorance, but I've been riding all my life and have never used a stabilizer. What is its purpose, and how big a difference does it make?
 

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Forgive the ignorance, but I've been riding all my life and have never used a stabilizer. What is its purpose, and how big a difference does it make?
That makes two of us. I do NOT have enough decades of riding experience but I only heard about it since I got the Strom. Is this something new and wonderful to experience besides the head buzzing or is this caused by certain speeds or roads.

Second thing, I noticed it on a sportbike and I asked the salesman. He said it was to stop tank slappers and it was only $400. What? I have them on some of my machines to control stops and I'm damn sure they are more like 30 bucks. NOT $400. Or is this yet ANOTHER item that gets special paint and screw them over pricing? :confused:

And while I'm at it....why can't it be made from a 25 buck 1" air cylinder with an 1/8 pinhole in the piston to restrict oil flow and the other ports sealed? After all, the intent is to stop RAPID movement and that is easily achievable by oil viscosity and port (pinhole) size.

Just wondering.....:confused:

 

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Forgive the ignorance, but I've been riding all my life and have never used a stabilizer. What is its purpose, and how big a difference does it make?
I am the same.

I know what they do, and on a (hard ridden) sportsbike or desert racer, yes I see the benefit.....but a Wee, just expensive bling imo.

Be interested in your thoughts with and without damper.
 

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it's not just tank slapper - they do make a difference - bike over bumps on an angle is more stable, less wriggles; - on the road, you will feel it - a subtle but noticeable difference especially riding over rough surface on a lean.

Off pavement are more dramatic - especially for dirt novoice like myself on non-extreme situation. Confirm by another experienced dirt rider.

I suggest getting one from Blair @ SV Racing unless u dont ride rough roads and unpaved roads at all -
 

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I have a left over damper from my son's 2004 R1.

I wonder if it could be adapted to the Wee (or to my XJR1300) not that I've ever experienced a tank slapper (on any bike I've owned).
 

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Greywolf will attest to the potential value of a steering damper.
The Wee, and more so the Vee-Strom, have the reputation for developing a "weavy" front end at high speed in some circumstances (and particularly with luggage on the back.

Why so? The peculiar fairing aerodynamics, or some quirk of the front suspension? Can't say, myself, but it is a widely reported phenomenon, even from the early years.
Having once "enjoyed" a full-on tankslapper at 90 mph [on a Ducati] - I'm talking of almost full lock-to-lock oscillation at 2 to 3 cycles-per-second - I regard the rather high expense of an adjustable rotary damper as worthwhile.
Expenditure on safety trumps expenditure on farkles of convenience.

There is also the benefit for dirt riding - especially for a large/heavy bike that is 97% designed for the road. (And perhaps more so when using road tyres on dirt, or semi-knobbly tyres on road.)

Why are rotary steering dampers so pricey?
Could a linear damper do the job i.e. provide adjustable level of damping as the front wheel deviates away from the midline (but not during the return) and/or provide two-way damping, on selection?
Don't know. I hope better brains might be able to advise on that.
.
 

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A broken hand and wrist plus a dislocated shoulder from a tank slapper cost me way more than $400 in money. It also cost me a riding season, arthritis, lots of pain and being less than 100% in the affected areas the rest of my life. I look at a steering damper like a helmet. I may never need it again but I'm not going to ride without it. I don't even know if one of the potholes, uneven road construction edges, angled grade crossings or passing semis on two lane roads through their wind streams I've encountered since getting a Scotts might have caused a problem without it. I do know none of them could. I don't know of anyone getting a linear damper to fit. The Scotts claimed advantages can be seen at Scotts Performance Products
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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A linear damper typically connects between the lower triple clamp and frame. That can be pretty difficult on a bike with a fairing and radiator not to mention no frame down tubes..

 

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A broken hand and wrist plus a dislocated shoulder from a tank slapper cost me way more than $400 in money. It also cost me a riding season, arthritis, lots of pain and being less than 100% in the affected areas the rest of my life. I look at a steering damper like a helmet. I may never need it again but I'm not going to ride without it. I don't even know if one of the potholes, uneven road construction edges, angled grade crossings or passing semis on two lane roads through their wind streams I've encountered since getting a Scotts might have caused a problem without it. I do know none of them could. I don't know of anyone getting a linear damper to fit. The Scotts claimed advantages can be seen at Scotts Performance Products
Do you have any details? Speed? Immediate traffic?

There HAS to be some scientific work on it.
 

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A linear damper typically connects between the lower triple clamp and frame. That can be pretty difficult on a bike with a fairing and radiator not to mention no frame down tubes..

Two linear dampers that caught my eye in passing were the one on a naked BMW R1200R (underneath) and the other one was on top. I "think" it was on a Yamaha.

Anywho...here is a video...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GvHtChodNk0
 

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Do you have any details? Speed? Immediate traffic?

There HAS to be some scientific work on it.
I was doing an indicated 119mph, real 109mph, on I-80 in Nevada on a straight stretch of road with no other traffic in sight. I just wanted to check the top speed of a new bike for a minute. It was a very bad idea. The bike had a tall touring windscreen and three pieces of hard luggage looking very much like the pic but was a blue 2005 model. It had completely stock suspension and no fork brace. The initial cause must have been aerodynamic as the pavement was in fine condition. It has been pretty well determined the fairing causes some front end lift at high speeds. Dropping the front end 10-15mm compared to the stock rear noticeably helps aerodynamic stability with a lower angle of attack. Luggage manufacturers warn not to exceed 80-85mph.

 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Original poster

I was riding all day :yesnod: so this reply is probably not needed. I didn't consider a stabilizer on my Wee until the bars got snatched out my hands by a rut on a North Carolina back road. The stabilizer would have damped the rapid bar movement long enough to exit the rut. As is was, I got tossed on the deck.

As I said, I had a stabilizer on my track bike and many's the time I had an unexpected wobble (when the front tire gets light) when I hammered the throttle exiting a turn AND with heavy braking at the end of a straight. As I also said, none of these turned into a tank slapper.

I agree with GrEywolf. It's a safety device, like a helmet.
 

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I was doing an indicated 119mph, real 109mph, on I-80 in Nevada on a straight stretch of road with no other traffic in sight. I just wanted to check the top speed of a new bike for a minute. It was a very bad idea. The bike had a tall touring windscreen and three pieces of hard luggage looking very much like the pic but was a blue 2005 model. It had completely stock suspension and no fork brace. The initial cause must have been aerodynamic as the pavement was in fine condition. It has been pretty well determined the fairing causes some front end lift at high speeds. Dropping the front end 10-15mm compared to the stock rear noticeably helps aerodynamic stability with a lower angle of attack. Luggage manufacturers warn not to exceed 80-85mph.

It's interesting to see how fast you were going. From a "make it simple stupid" world of engineering, I would be hard pressed to believe that there would be an aerodynamic cause of "pushing" the wheels around at 50-60 miles an hour.

I looked around the net and it appears that low traction, lift, wheelies and acceleration are running the same path of reduced front end load.....and tank slappers.

Maybe I should of bought a Hog and put the pillion seat on the handlebars. :confused:
 

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Thanks all for the information. I understand there may be a scenario where the device would be helpful.

I have probably felt some of the same things as noted above, however after riding for most of my life on a dirt bike the sliding/bouncing of the front end doesn't even phase me. That "sloppy" feeling is actually more normal! :)
 
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