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Discussion Starter #1
Just received and installed my Scotts Steering Dampener.
Took about 3 hours to install. no biggie over all.
question: What settings are you running yours?

Base? hi flow, and angle?
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Stock, unchanged from the way it came.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Stock!! I hate that word, But the master is the reason I bought this *#@#$$$$$ thing. So I guess I should continue to follow "fathers" advice.


thanks

Jerry
 

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YES, as usual, GrEywolf is right. Be careful if you go fooling with the settings. I wanted to play with mine and dialed it REALLY tight "just to see" how it would react, and it felt OK straight and smooth, but the road I was on comes to a hard right hook at a stop sign, and when I hit the brakes hard while making that hook, the damper tried to hold the front wheel straight and I almost went down because I was expecting the front to turn and was weight shifting and it started getting weird real quick. The guys who built the damper know what they are doing. Don't try to second-guess them. You may think the thing is not doing anything while you are riding, but that's how it works. If you feel resistance while riding normally, it's waaaaaaay too tight. You should feel nothing. It's like an airbag, you never know it's there until you get in a situation where you need it, then it will make its presence known.
 

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45 degree angle, one turn more low speed resistance over stock (I think 4 clicks from the "weak" side). I find the bike is a bit more stable at freeway speeds (75+ mph) in a stiff (20 mph+) crosswind (typical summer day in Idaho) with more low speed damping than stock. I turn the low speed down to 2 clicks when I am teaching or practicing slow speed maneuvers on the range. I have not altered the high speed circuit.

Steve
 

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With all due respect, I must inform you that it is a "damper" and not a "dampener". It doesn't dampen (moisten) anything. It does, however, provide damping, meaning it is a damper.

Mine is stock everywhere except the main damping control....I'm up about 4 or 5 clicks from how it came.
 

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Check definition #2. Dampener is a correct usage.

damp·en (d
m
p
n)
v. damp·ened, damp·en·ing, damp·ens
v.tr. 1. To make damp.
2. To deaden, restrain, or depress: "trade moves . . . aimed at dampening protectionist pressures in Congress" (Christian Science Monitor).
3. To soundproof.

v.intr. To become damp.



Webster's New World Dictionary Second College Edition, page 357, agrees:

2. to deaden, depress, reduce, or lessen

Of course, if you use it in the rain, it will be a damp damper or perhaps a dampened dampener. :D
 

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....Check definition #2. Dampener is a correct usage....
While "dampener" may be a correct usage, "damper" is the correct usage.

I'll also add, that this is an industry standard term, however, Scotts Performance refers to this product as a "stabilizer".
 
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