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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Title is for google search purposes.


So being a little disaponted by the lack of DIY threads on the ScottOiler, Touring kit in paticular, I have decided to do my own write up with pictures.

The PDF DL650 Specific instructions from Scott Oiler were helpful. However, I feel that a hands on guide found here could come in handy as well.

So to start.

Step 1- Remove the seat.

Step 2- Attach little black elbow connector to long thin black hose.

Step 3- Move to the Right side of the bike (brake side.) Sit on the ground if needed and push the radiator hose out away from the engine so you can see up to the throttle body.
Here you will see a little black cap on the throttle body with a silver spring clamp to hold this cap in place. Use a pair of Long needle Nose pliers to pinch the spring clamp and remove (save this, you can use it later). Now pull the rubber nipple cap off with the needle nose pliers.


Step 4- The Brass nipple will be exposed causing a vacuum leak if you were to start the bike. Here is where you connect the black elbow connector with the long black hose.
This location is far easier to reach then the nipple on the left side of the bike.



Step 5- Fish the end of the black hose up behind the wiring harness into the under seat compartment.


Step 6- I suggest you pre-fill your oil reservoirs before installing them. If you make a mess due to inexperience (Like I did) then it won’t be in your storage space, it will be on your work bench.
I tucked my reservoir on top of my tool kit. It fits snuggly. I’m not particularly happy with its current location. But I won’t mind as soon as I get my hard bags because then my tool kit will be in there.

Step 7- find the handy drain hole in bottom corner (clutch side). Get on the ground next to the bike, clutch side and run the length of clear plastic tubing (with the tube guide on the tube already) up through the drain hole to connect to the oiler mechanism.


Step 8- mount the oiling tip appropriately. I used the smallest bracket and mounted at the stock spindle mounts under the chain adjuster. I also cut back the hard black plastic tubing because the full length was unnecessary and difficult to work with.
I initially used silicone to mount the tube guide under the swing arm. It did not hold @ all. So I cleaned the surface with rubbing alcohol and used double stick tape. That did the trick. I secured all hose to frame with twist ties and re used the silver spring clamp to secure the clear hose to the oiler mechanism.
 

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XBollox, That's a really nice walk through. Those Scott oilers are very good and once fitted you can just forget them...mostly, apart from filling them up of course. And no chain cleaning eh!

Just one point I would mention to you...we had a lad with some bike or another, can't actually remember what it was now as it was a long time ago, but he too had clipped short the black outer hard plastic shielding on the clear plastic tube at the rear sprocket end. This is done quite a bit by owners. However, in this lads case he came off the bike due to springing a leak in the plastic tubing just where the tube abraded the holding bolt and washer. Oil found it's way on to the rear tyre. It took over a year for this to happen but the constant vibration was the cause of the split appearing. Just keep a check on it and you'll be fine. Enjoy...
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thank you for the heads up, I will be sure to add that visual inspection into my routine inspections. Also I am going to add a bit of foam padding behind that spot on the clear tube now.


Any body want to tell me where I should adjust the knob to get the proper 2 drops per minute flow?
 

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Very nice, but why'd you put it there? It's going to leak all over the place...

I fitted mine inside the givi sidecase rack on the non-muffler side of my wee. it's a perfect fit, plus it's easy to access and completely out of sight with the sidecase on the bike.
I'd posted pictures of it on here before, but well, maybe they got lost, so in order to contribute to your thread (great title), here is one:
(I used zipties with an eye end that I could pass the stock bolt through, it's held fine for the last two years, OH, and that crazy-glue they include in the kit is THE SH!T, that stuff holds really well and will stick anything to anything.)
 

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What do you mean where do I have my oiler set?
It's next to the reservoir, as per the touring kits design.

In case you mean at what drip setting I have it, there really only is one: the slowest, and even that is too fast.
 

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Sweet set up Sitting Duck....

and Scott's fitment says the touring out fit incompatible with the Stroms(behind the plate I guess). Big +1 on the super glue, I have an oiler on my KLR and glued a hose holder on the bottom of the swingarm, and it has held through some pretty tough high grass(I am to gimped up for real off roading). I just got an E model, with a lube tube, just got to fit it to the wee, wish I had looked at the pannier set up, would have saved some $$$. BTW I have to set my KLR oiler to near prime to keep oil moving when it gets below 20f,otherwise I set it about 2-3 for non rainy conditions in the summer, one of the reasons I went with the E system, not temperature dependent.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I thought about behind the liscense plate mount.... but she doesn't even have a 1000 miles on her. I don't want to start drilling holes already. That is what my sv is for.
 

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Great post and good photos. One question though, does the oil reach both sides of the chain? I’ve always wondered if you need the double nozzle setup (one each side of the sprocket) to lube all of the rings.

Cheers
 

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It kind of wicks to the other side, but my next setup is a dual nozzle type for sure. It'll keep the chain cleaner on the inboard side.

I don't really understand chains. On my old bikes, I did no maintenace at all on the chain, other than smearing them with bearing grease every so often.
When I bought the wee, I religiously applied a high quality chain lube every week, and the chain was shot after 10,000 kms. I think I got a bum chain from the factory.
My new chain (I changed the sprockets too) is 14,000 kms old and still perfect.
I don't know if I shoud credit the chain's quality ot the scottoiler, but I definitely like the peace of mind afforded by the scottoiler; I can just ride and forget about the thing, other than filling the reservoir with ATF every 15,000kms or so.
 

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Upgrade: Scottoiler Dual Injector Kit



The Dual Injector delivers oil to both sides of your chain simultaneously and is the culmination of several years of product design and testing. This is the most accurate system in chain cleaning and lubrication. This product is an add-on to the Mark7 kits.

* Dual Injector
o Optional Accessory
o Plug & Play
o Small & Flexible
o MK7 compatible
o Blend-in black color
o Simplifies chain cleaning
o Extends your chain's life span


Price: $39.95
 

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Prime problem

This is the first time I've installed a Scottoiler since 01 on my FZ1. Can't remember any problems priming the FZ1 but after installing on the Wee, I had to blow on the inlet hose enough that I had to change shorts three times before I forced the oil down to the tip. 65 degrees F here tonight.
If I remember correctly, I just turned to prime on the FZ1 and it eventually ran out the tip.
I installed the non-touring model on the inside of the top GIVI racks as above but ran the outlet tube inside the side panels with a loop and then down the sub frame to the swing arm. The loop is below the reservoir. I'm about to run the outlet hose down the rack strut to the swing arm like the later poster. Still don't understand why the lack if prime. I checked the zip ties and none were compressing the hose. Any thoughts? Ian, Iowa
 

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Anyone ever have it draw oil up the vacuum line?
No, it's physically impossible for it to do that, as the vacuum (needle-lifting) and the oil-drip mechanisms are not connected in any way that oil can get from the one into the other.
I think that's a pretty dumb question actually; maybe a smarter question would have been "how does the system work? any chance of it sucking oil up the vacuum line?

The vacuum lifts up a needle that meters the oil dispensing onto the sprocket; the oil never gets into the tube that lifts the needle, and even if there were damage to its diaphragm, the vacuum tube would only suck in normal athmosphere.
 
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