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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,

This is my first post on the forum so... yay me! :)

I recently bought a used wee 650 2007 model and I found some slight rust on some parts. Specifically on the exhaust pipe and some connector under the radiator (See attached images)

The pipe seems in general more discolored on the right side and more rusty on the left side of the bike so I assume that the previous owner was just letting the bike on the side stand to dry and the water gathered and dripped from the left side.
The rust on the pipe doesn't seem to be that bad (actually it looks worse on the picture than it is).
Is it safe if I use sandpaper to remove the rust? And then apply some corrosion protection product?

What do you guys think?
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Leave it alone or use metal polish. It's only on the surface and the oxidation will prevent further corrosion. Being aggressive will just remove more metal. The exhaust pipe is stainless steel. It's a grade that gives up some beauty for strength. Whatever you do, never use steel wool. Fibers break off, embed, and actually do cause rust. The oil line ends are a bit different material. It looks like the previous owner might have made the mistake of using steel wool.
 

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I've restored several old Honda CB's and have used aluminum wool (scotchbrite) soaked in WD40 to clean up minor surface corrosion on bolts, clamps, etc.
 

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When I pull into my garage after a couple hours on expressways at night, the front header pipe on my Vee glows a bit. The rear a bit brighter.

It's a single wall pipe so any chemical residue may burn. Figure the "earthy color" header adds to your rider's cred.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the replies guys :)
I really don't mind the look. As you said, it adds credit to the rider :p
I'm more worried that the corrosion will continue.

Should I still spray it with the corrosion protector?
What about that junction thingy under the radiator? Should I do anything about that?
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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The corrosion will not go through. Like I said, it actually protects the deeper metal. I'm pretty sure the oil cooler pipe hardware is plated rather than stainless. Still, it is very beefy and unlikely to cause a problem. Any added product would burn off the exhaust pipe but the oil pipe junction doesn't get nearly as hot.
 

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For light rust I usually use scotchbrite and some kind of petroleum based remover (ACF-50? or light oil) to scrub down the surface. If there is pitting, likely not worth going after on an exhaust pipe as you have to remove too much metal. Most rust removers are acid based, so I wouldn't use those. Once you're done, wipe down oil based with a solvent such as naptha or mineral spirits, let dry before you fire up the engine. Or instead maybe just go over the whole thing with a metal polish such as Autosol. After cleaning off what you can get off, if pitted, you can use a rust converter product which will just harden what's there (test this on something else before deciding if you want to go there).
 

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Just leave it alone and ride it. If you are really anal about it look for a better pipe on fleabay. There are many since they don't break and are left over when a bike is parted out. But I would not worry about it and spend my time and efforts on more important changes or upgrades.
 

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If I was as worried as you seem to be about the look of the bike, for Pete's sake don't ever ride it. You'll just make yourself unhappy.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Once again, thank you all for your replies.

Just to clarify, I'm not worried about the looks of the motorbike at all. I'm worried about it's "health".
I don't want any rust/corrosion to eat through and damage the pipe.

Since you all say that this will not happen, then I'm completely fine with letting it be :)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I decided to leave it be for now.
I'll just apply a thin coat of engine oil for the winter, because the humidity is quite high around here (I live in Denmark)
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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what about using Rust-Oleum Bar-B-Que Black Satin High Heat Spray Paint guys ? Wont kill the pipe right ?
Coatings other that ceramic do not typically last for very long.
 

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You can also get pipe wrap for the front exhaust pipe. A side benefit is to reduce the amount of exhaust pipe induced heat into the oil cooler.
 

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You can also get pipe wrap for the front exhaust pipe. A side benefit is to reduce the amount of exhaust pipe induced heat into the oil cooler.
I hadn't thought of that. How significant is the effect on the oil temperature I wonder. What is the primary function of the oil cooler, to keep the oil itself cool, or to cool the engine via the oil (I know, a fairly airy fairy distinction).

Does oil do it's lubrication job best when warmer of cooler ?
 

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Good question about oil temps. Check the oil thread for more insight into oil qualities than anybody really needs:) I have lower fairings, so you can't see my pipe anyhow. I did get the wrap to reduce oil temps to keep the viscosity up a hair compared to having a glowing hot furnace right in front of the oil cooler. I would bet that the oil both cools the engine and lubricates it, though cooling would be a relatively small function compared to the actual cooling system for the bike. I often ride down or over to warm areas and think about how hot that oil must be in there and just thought that taking some of the heat away from the oil would be a good idea. On most 'Stroms, where you can see the pipe, wrapping it would also look a little "racey", too.
 

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I did get the wrap to reduce oil temps to keep the viscosity up a hair compared to having a glowing hot furnace right in front of the oil cooler.
That is my take, that header pipe gets really hot and dumps heat into the oil cooler. I'm sure Suzuki knew this when sizing the oil cooler but if that heat load can be avoided so much the better.

On most 'Stroms, where you can see the pipe, wrapping it would also look a little "racey", too.
I don't like the look of exhaust wrap so I bought one of these;
Prestone CP1718 - Carburetor Pre-Heater Hose | O'Reilly Auto Parts

Its a 1.75"IDx18" all-metal carburetor pre-heater accordion hose that I slipped over the front header pipe on my project bike. Here is a better pic out of the package;
http://shop.advanceautoparts.com/wcsstore/CVWEB/staticproductimage//733/large/5194679_rnb_96022_pri_larg.jpg

No pic of it installed yet as I haven't actually got my bike running with this mod so be forewarned it is functionally and aesthetically experimental! I might end up cutting it off if it doesn't work or look good but I wanted to try something to block the header heat from dumping into the oil cooler. YMMV
 

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This is turning into a solution in search of a problem. Very little heat is transferred from the pipe into the oil cooler.
 
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