StromTrooper banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My 2004 Wee started running rough then quit a few times barley made it home. After looking at several possible causes discovered that the fuel pump pickup area was full of rust. Looks like inside the tank the metal overflow tube has some rust on it as well.

Cleaned it all out including the filters (trying not to have to buy those :jawdrop:) and it seems to be running fine now.

Question is what may have caused this and what can be done to prevent it in the future? Only 12,500 miles since I can't ride all that often and always careful where I but gas.

Got lucky this time close to the house, sure don't want to get stuck out on the back roads we ride on, any suggestions appreciated!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Could be ethanol. Our gas in NC can have as much as 10% ethanol in it. The ethanol will absorb moisture from the air. I have a 1967 truck that doesn't get drove much and had a very similar problem.

I have heard some people say that high test isn't as bad, I don't know. Another alternative is to find a good additive. Or aviation fuel, 100LL, which is 100 octane low lead. Aviation fuel has high quality control standards and no ethanol. However, I wouldn't mention to the guy at the airport what you are gonna use it for. I have a friend that is a pilot and he uses it in his weedeater, lawn mower etc and likes it because it has such a longer shelf life. When you put the bike away for the winter you could fill it with the 100LL for storage purposes.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,417 Posts
2004 with 12,000 miles is around 2,000 miles per year.

That's a fair bit of sitting around.

Do you just do short hops or one or two longer rides per year?

I'd use a fuel stabilizer all the time and keep the tank full, either way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,442 Posts
There are a couple of brands of multi-part systems to clean then coat the interior of your tank. Be sure to get it completely clean...some folks put a bunch of pennies in there with the cleaner and rattle it around until all the rust has been removed, then coat. Follow the product directions exactly. For a tank this large, you might need an additional bottle of the coating all done at the same time.

The air space inside the tank while the bike is sitting is likely the problem. Your humid climate, plus alcohol in the gas, plus sitting all contributes.

As said, use a gasoline stabilizer and keep the tank full. Or, RIDE MORE :hurray::hurray::hurray:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,157 Posts
I used that Kreem Tank sealant, on an older Kaw....ended up screwing up the paint on my tank, and gunking up the fuel level bobbin, but it's sealed!

Getting Kreem's nitric acid [to clean/etch the inside of the tank] out out of the tank is tough with all the baffles in it - and my masking job obviously was not up to that task! Good luk with that, or resign yourself to repainting your tank post-sealing.....you've been warned
 

·
Evolving Curmudgeon
Joined
·
1,119 Posts
Star Brite makes a great product called Star Tron that eliminates moisture and alcohol related fuel problems. As was mentioned, metal fuel tanks should always be stored full of stabilized fuel to help prevent condensation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Could be ethanol. Our gas in NC can have as much as 10% ethanol in it. The ethanol will absorb moisture from the air. I have a 1967 truck that doesn't get drove much and had a very similar problem.

I have heard some people say that high test isn't as bad, I don't know. Another alternative is to find a good additive. Or aviation fuel, 100LL, which is 100 octane low lead. Aviation fuel has high quality control standards and no ethanol. However, I wouldn't mention to the guy at the airport what you are gonna use it for. I have a friend that is a pilot and he uses it in his weedeater, lawn mower etc and likes it because it has such a longer shelf life. When you put the bike away for the winter you could fill it with the 100LL for storage purposes.
You, North Americans are a happy people. When they mix ethanol they add only 10%... Here, in Brazil, our fuel have 25% added...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
I used that Kreem Tank sealant, on an older Kaw....ended up screwing up the paint on my tank, and gunking up the fuel level bobbin, but it's sealed!

Getting Kreem's nitric acid [to clean/etch the inside of the tank] out out of the tank is tough with all the baffles in it - and my masking job obviously was not up to that task! Good luk with that, or resign yourself to repainting your tank post-sealing.....you've been warned
I've used this stuff on 2 bike tanks and 2 car tanks, with 100% success. My Kawasaki had fuel leaking out through rust holes and this stuff fixed it!!! Highly recommended.

And I don't think it's nitric acid - more likely to be phosphoric but don't quote me on that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,508 Posts
Kreem is Komplete Krap. If you decide to line your tank, please don't use that garbage. It's caused more heartbreak than high heels and short skirts put together.

POR15 is what the vintage bike folks usually use:
http://www.por15.com/CYCLE-TANK-REPAIR-KIT/productinfo/CTRK/

There are a couple of other brands of epoxy products that work equally well.



On tanks that a re structurally OK, I've also seen several people have excellent results by soaking the tank with a couple of gallons of Evapo-Rust. Basically, dump it in, let it sit overnight, and rotate the tank daily so that every part spends a day or so in contact with the Evapo-Rust, allowing the solution to eat up the rust. Evapo-rust doesn't stink or create noxious vapors, and it's safe for paint, hands, your plants, etc. Goooood stuff!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
+1 on the startron. Stabil doesn't work well with ethanol gas; my honda rancher wouldn't run this spring after using Stabil. My local shop has been testing the startron and it works well with ethanol. I paid $7 for a bottle and it treats 48 gallons and lasts 2 years.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top