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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings all,

My dealer says he uses Royal Purple in his personal bikes. I had never heard of it but found it on the web. A question, Is it worth the price? About 10-12 dollars a quart!

Anybody agree its worth that?

thx, good rides.
 

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Hell, I will add to this one since it is newer and I didn't see the other one...

I use it in the diffs of my truck and tranny of my Harley. My brother uses it in diffs, transmission, and transfer case of his truck. All I can say is that the gas mileage increased in all 3 vehicles after it was put in. Not by much, but almost an entire mpg in my truck. My brother got 2 mpg in his diesel.....

Seems good and worth the money for 90 weight replacement.
 

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All of the high end oils are worth it if you plan on keeping the bike for an extended period of time and use extended drain intervals IMO. These oils basically last much much longer than Dino oils so using them longer helps justify thier cost. I run Amsoil for one reason and one reason only, Ive seen samples of most of the top oils under an electron microscope and Amsoil molecules were by far the most consistant. Consistantly sized molecules mean better flow.


FWIW, Randy.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Longer change intervals......

most definetly, the expensive synthetic oils were designed to last longer but if i adhere to a 3k, 4k or 5k mile change interval, is it necessary to to spend the $$ on Royal P?

I think most everyone will agree that a quality oil like Amsoil, run for 3k or 4k, is barely degraded and hasn't lost any of its design properties.

I guess if we don't mind spending an extra $20 per oil change and feel better about our engine, then we will.

Agree?

Good rides.
 

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If you read some of the articles about synthetics, you would be quite surprised. Most synthetics will run in an engine for 8-10k miles without breaking down. All you have to do is pull the filter and add some more every 2-3k miles and it will stay nice and clean.... Conventional motor oil usage is actually rated to around 5k miles in cars and trucks. The whole 3k mile thing was based off an advertising campaign back in the late 70's (according to a google search). At any rate, synthetic or conventional seems to be a huge debate among bikers, grease monkeys, greasers, racers, and scientists.... By my account, use beer. It will at least give us 3 choices.
 

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If you read some of the articles about synthetics, you would be quite surprised. Most synthetics will run in an engine for 8-10k miles without breaking down. All you have to do is pull the filter and add some more every 2-3k miles and it will stay nice and clean.... Conventional motor oil usage is actually rated to around 5k miles in cars and trucks. The whole 3k mile thing was based off an advertising campaign back in the late 70's (according to a google search). At any rate, synthetic or conventional seems to be a huge debate among bikers, grease monkeys, greasers, racers, and scientists.... By my account, use beer. It will at least give us 3 choices.

I agree completely Sled, to take the extended drain intervals a bit further, my father and I practice this method on our vehicles too. We both have a dual by-pass filtration system installed on our trucks that filter down to less than 10 microns, his is a 7.3 liter diesel and mine a 6.8 liter V-10. My dad is retired and pulls a 15,000 RV with him everywhere he goes. We have both gone over 50,000 miles without an oil change using the proper engine specific Amsoil motor oil. In order to do this an oil sample is taken every 10,000 miles and sent in for a complete analysis by an independant labratory. In about 10 days we get a detailed report that lists every subtance that is found in the oil, where it came from (i.e. camshaft wear, main bearing wear, anti-freeze ect. ect.) and a graph showing how much each item had changed since the last test. You also get a recommendation on whether the oil can continue to be used. One of the factors also is that of the 2 filters, one is changed every 12,000 miles and the other about every 30,000 miles so when this is done, your adding new oil to replace the oil lost in the filter change. That also helps keep the oil fresh. After 5 positive tests and 50,000 miles, we changed the oil anyway even though we got an approval to go at least one more cycle. Why go through this? Neither one of us want to buy another 40+ thousand dollar vehicle again anytime in the near future. Mine is a '99 with only 92,000 miles and still on its 2nd oil change, his a '01 with 165,000 miles and just starting its 4th oil change. Both engines still have over 90% of the original compression that they had when they were new.

FWIW, Randy.
 

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If you read some of the articles about synthetics, you would be quite surprised. Most synthetics will run in an engine for 8-10k miles without breaking down. All you have to do is pull the filter and add some more every 2-3k miles and it will stay nice and clean.... Conventional motor oil usage is actually rated to around 5k miles in cars and trucks. The whole 3k mile thing was based off an advertising campaign back in the late 70's (according to a google search). At any rate, synthetic or conventional seems to be a huge debate among bikers, grease monkeys, greasers, racers, and scientists.... //
We've had oil analysis done on several cars and company trucks. None have ever shown any distress at the manufacturer-recommended 7,500 interval - synthetic, "synthetic blend," or dino.

Bikes are different in some ways, I've never had analysis done on one. Maybe I should!

//We both have a dual by-pass filtration system installed on our trucks that filter down to less than 10 microns, his is a 7.3 liter diesel and mine a 6.8 liter V-10. My dad is retired and pulls a 15,000 RV with him everywhere he goes. We have both gone over 50,000 miles //
WalMart is the largest fleet operator in the US. They demand a 100,000 mile drain interval on new trucks.
 

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For most vehicles that are used on normal roads and aren't stressed by towing, excessive high temperature idling, used off road where grit ingestion is an issue can benefit from using synthetics with an extended drain interval. Amsoil's dual filtration system is one of the best and least expensive ways to go with high-dollar towing rigs. Most likely, the engine and transmission will outlast the rest of the vehicle with reasonable care. The same is possible with standard passsenger cars that adhere to reasonable service intervals for the type of usage. If you tow with an automatic transmission car for instance, you should probably cut the recommended interval for oil changes, transmission fluid and final drive lube in half. Or, go to synthetic lube and change it at the normal recommended interval.
Normal service or light duty usage you can safely double the manfacturer's recomendations for fluid changes if you use synthetics.

On my weestrom, I will use sythetic and change at the factory recommended interval until the warranty is done....I'll probably change the oil at 5k from then on because it is easy to remember multiples of 5. Call me lazy, but that makes it easy to remember.
 

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My own experience.....I was happy with it for the first 2 change intervals, then started noticing the temps going up, and unhappy noise from my valves. Switched to lucas semi synthetic and after 2 changes to get that purple crap out of my motor, my strom is happy again and running at normal temps. I wasn't the least bit impressed, especially after all the hype I'd read about it. Lucas is half the price, almost water clear (nice for seeing any contamination), and makes my baby happy. I wouldn't go back to royal purple if they sold it for 2 buck a quart.
 
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