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Discussion Starter #1
For folks that have installed the risers, anyone run into any issues with getting a socket allen driver to the bolts into the OEM handlebar grip on the fork?

Can you really torque those bolts enough with just a standard Allen key? Safe enough for riding, especially standing on the pegs and loading the bars vertically?

Anybody ran into any issues, any tips/tricks, let me know. Has anyone replaced the allen bolts with a standard hex head (I know, ugly, but you can wrench it from the side instead of the top).

Thx.
 

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When I installed mine I had the same issue.

What I did was tighten the rear (closest to the seat) bolts as tight as I could and left the front (closest to the windshield) bolts loose. I was able to pivot the risers to my liking with that and then access the front bolts.

Hope this helps but I am afraid that if you don't pivot the risers as close to the rider as I did it may not.

Good luck.
 

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Pretty much that was my experience, too. It's been secure, except for the time I forgot to tighten the front bolts when I adjusted the bar angle. Doh!!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks! I want to pull back the bars so tightening one side and then rotating and then tightening the front side will probably work.

It seems that allen keys are one of those tools that folks should just buy a few sets of common sizes.....folks cut them down, mount then in chucks, etc. Cheap enough to get the size I need and cut down to a stubby if necessary.
 

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I tried cutting one down with a metal cutting blade but could hardly make a scratch. Unless you have the right set up, believe me, UPS is faster.
 

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On the Wee, there is a specified order for torquing the bar clamps. There is a dimple in the clamps that is supposed to point either fore or aft. Then, IIRC, you torque the front, then the rear. With the risers, I turned the clamps, torqued the rear, rotated the riser into the desired position (I recall a rubber mallet might help), then torque the front. I also have a cut-down hex key in my toolkit lest they require an on-road snugging - they never have.
 

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Yep, this is all pretty much the procedure Rox will recommend if you call them. Snug down the rear bolt all the way (or as much as you can and still be able to rotate the riser), rotate the risers where you want them, then torque the front one. This has held firmly on my Vee so far.
 

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Yep, this is all pretty much the procedure Rox will recommend if you call them. Snug down the rear bolt all the way (or as much as you can and still be able to rotate the riser), rotate the risers where you want them, then torque the front one. This has held firmly on my Vee so far.
It's designed as "gapped joint". Just try to end up with similar gaps under the front & rear of each cap. Neither should bottom out. When you tighten the front bolts you are also stretching the rear bolts. Depending on friction under the caps the resulting bolt stretch and clamping force front & rear may not be equal, but they're far more than adequate.
 

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It's designed as "gapped joint". Just try to end up with similar gaps under the front & rear of each cap. Neither should bottom out. When you tighten the front bolts you are also stretching the rear bolts. Depending on friction under the caps the resulting bolt stretch and clamping force front & rear may not be equal, but they're far more than adequate.
+1

Set them up right and tighten them down evenly then just loosen the front bolts, rotate into place and tighten up the fronts.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Your "how to" description is better than my attempt!
+1
That makes good sense, do it right with them upright to set the rear and front evenly, then loosen the one you can get to, rotate into position and then snug up.

Also, I agree with earlier comment on cutting down a key.....UPS is probably faster than an abrasion wheel and clamps etc.

Thanks to all.....I have not seen a real install procedure tips discussed for the risers in the forum yet, so I guess now it's out there for others.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
BTW, after all the loosening up and disconnecting wires and hose clamps......I found my brake and clutch lines too tight for my liking.

I know folks with Vee's have been able to make it work but I'm was planning to replace my lines this year anyway (12 year old bike, no idea of how old these ones are.....), so I can wait for new longer lines and then move the handlebars up and back a bit. Easier than rerouting lines twice and I'll feel safer.
 

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It's designed as "gapped joint". Just try to end up with similar gaps under the front & rear of each cap. Neither should bottom out. When you tighten the front bolts you are also stretching the rear bolts. Depending on friction under the caps the resulting bolt stretch and clamping force front & rear may not be equal, but they're far more than adequate.
Is that different from the Wee? The Wee clamps have a punch mark that in stock configuration. Then, directions are to torque the front (23N-m, 16 lb-ft), then tighten the rear to the same. This puts the whole gap at the rear. For my Rox risers, I reversed the clamp, tightening the rear firest, and putting my gap at the front. Of course, I seriously doubt it matters that much.
 

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Is that different from the Wee? The Wee clamps have a punch mark that in stock configuration. Then, directions are to torque the front (23N-m, 16 lb-ft), then tighten the rear to the same. This puts the whole gap at the rear. For my Rox risers, I reversed the clamp, tightening the rear firest, and putting my gap at the front. Of course, I seriously doubt it matters that much.
I didn't receive directions with mine and didn't look for marks. To be honest, I once designed a similar gapped joint for a tractor and just went with what I was taught about bolted joint design at the time.

I'm with you though in sensing that these joints have a lot more clamping force than needed to just stay tight --- they're probably beefy to ensure a solid, stiff feel and maybe to survive a hard drop.
 
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