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Riding from Portland Maine to the Robert-Bourassa dam. Any suggestions for routes or things we must see.

Thanks.
Mike
 

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I did that trip out of Ontario a couple of years back with chef biker. Limited roads in the north and roads are generally pretty straight. Do take the ride over to Chisabi and find your way on the gravel over to the James Bay coast. The hydro tour is great, it is free and can be booked in advance. I recommend booking this to ensure you get an english tour. Their is a dam just prior to Chisabi that you can ride over and there is a nice overlook on the far side. A very good website exists on the James Bay Road. Reference this one. No extra fuel is required for a dl650 on the James Bay road, but I see you ride a 1000. You need enough fuel for 237 miles (381km) between Matagami and the fuel stop on the James Bay Road. Speed limit is 100km/hr and I saw no enforcement along this isolated area.
 

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pm me if you want any details, especially from Matagami to Radisson. My route took us from Southern Ontario through Rouyn-Noranda to Matagami in late June. We camped most of the time. Lots of free opportunities above Matagami (read about the bears if you plan on bringing food and camping) and adequate motel accomodation in Matagami and in Radisson. ..Ken
 

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If you camp just north of Matagami at the first public campground, be prepared for large crowds, many gasoline generators and limited tent sites, all on sand. That being said, it's a great jump off point for the next day. When Ken and I rode the JBR we experienced temperatures in the neighbourhood of 35 degrees Celsius on the ride up that dropped to 6 degrees C. on the trip back two days later, with torrential rain. Be prepared for the weather and the bugs, (we never experienced many, but it's northern Canada after all!), but above all be prepared for a life altering experience. It's an amazing trip on one of the few remaining truly remote routes. In Radisson, the hotel chef was a young turk from Cape Breton and his cooking was phenomenal. Think house smoked Arctic char and duck confit Eggs Benedict. The natives are extremely friendly, especially if you show interest in their culture and history.
 
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