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On the curvy road that descends from my house to work, cracks in the blacktop have been repaired with squiggly lines of tar. They seem slick. I try to avoid them but I hit them inevitably. Thankfully the lane going up is much freer of tar. Is there any standard that I should show to the road department in my county in an effort to have them resurface the road? Any anecdotes, statistics or studies? It just feels dangerous.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Tar snakes are trouble. You need to change though, not them. They are a fact of life. Avoid spending time in contact with them. Do your best to keep the bike in an upright position when they are unavoidable and cross them at right angles when possible. Keep your speed appropriate.
 

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I spent the better part of today riding twisty roads, covered with tar snakes with pouring rain added to the mix.

Tons of fun....

YAHOO!!! :yikes:
 

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I spent the better part of today riding twisty roads, covered with tar snakes with pouring rain added to the mix.

Tons of fun....

YAHOO!!! :yikes:
And the fcukers get pretty hard when it's cold and they become slick like ice.:furious:

Ken
 

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Tar snakes are trouble. You need to change though, not them. They are a fact of life. Avoid spending time in contact with them. Do your best to keep the bike in an upright position when they are unavoidable and cross them at right angles when possible. Keep your speed appropriate.
I can't put it into better words.
 

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I have a tar-snake nursery near my home.
They're no worse than gravel really; you get used to them.
They are annoying, but rarely large enough to cause trouble (more on this below).

They feel weird at low speeds, and some of them feel scary at high speeds, but here's something you need to understand:
There are two types of tar snakes:
- the ones that go parralel to your direction of travel
- the ones that go across your direction of travel.

Your tire will will lose traction on both of them, but:
1) the problem is mostly in your head
2) they are only an issue when cornering, unless you're stupid enough to follow one while going straight
3) in the case of the one that goes parallel to your direction of travel, you're back on asphalt pretty quickly (after taking at most a 2" step to the outside)
4) in the case of the ones that are perpendicular to your direction of travel, you're past them so fast that they barely impact your bike.

They are a bit trickier on a wet road, as it takes your tire more time to get a grip on the road again after slipping off the tar-snake.
There is a particularly nasty double-wide one on my way back from school (left lane of the S-curve on the eastbound 91). If I hit that one at anything over 120 kph in the wet, my tire skips out enough that the place where it would regain grip is RIGHT ON THE PAINTED DOTTED LINE. Now that is what some would call a major problem, but since I wear waterproof pants and waterproofing works both ways, I figure I'm fine.
Sure, the bike fishtails a bit, but the strom is really good at recovering from that, and it encourages the cagers around me to give me some space.
 

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... but since I wear waterproof pants and waterproofing works both ways, I figure I'm fine.
That's funny.

As for the original question, tar snakes are far cheaper than resurfacing every couple years just because of some cracking. Unfortunately, they will probably tell you to not ride your bike if it worries you.
 

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And the fcukers get pretty hard when it's cold and they become slick like ice.
They can also be a problem on a hot, sunny day when they become soft enough to "grab" a tire. I remember one day riding my old Goldwing with brand-new tires...the tar snakes were grabbing so hard while cornering that I thought the bars were going to be jerked out of my hands.

But we are destined to see more of them rather than less.
 
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