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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I installed some risers that I got through eBay (good value new at £20.00). I already had some 20mm risers but I still felt stretched out. The new ones are a 32mm rise and 40mm back. The riding position for me is great but it was a very tight fit to get them on with existing cables. I have read that others have done this so I knew it was possible. I had to take off the cable guide for the front brake hose (from handlebar to stanchion) and replace with cable tie - this looks OK and take the throttle cables out of their guide, although they are still tight on full lock. Clutch seems OK but again tight. My question is whether others have felt it necessary to re-route the throttle cables behind the forks rather than through the stanchion and if so, can one detach the cables from the twistgrip without having to take the tank off? Secondly is there any way of replacing the brake cable with goes down to the stanchion? It looks like a specialist part rather than something that can be made up.
 

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To reroute the throttle cables, you can split the housing by removing the screws that hold it together on the handle bar. Then you can remove them from the housing and route behind the triple tree. My memory is that I had to lower the forks to do so, but it may be possible to do it without that step.

Galfer makes a +2 inch top hose, and also a complete kit for lengthening the top brake line in stainless. I got mine from Richland Rick, who had a kit, and who I highly recommend if he still has them. I don't know if he ships internationally, but Galfer is available pretty much everywhere.

http://www.galfer.eu/index.php/en/
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for information. Very useful. I guess it won't be difficult to try and re-route the throttle cables. My problem in Switzerland is that I cannot modify brakes without homologated parts and then modification has to be added to registration documents. Thus, they won't accept braided lines, even though these are superior to OEM ones, unless there is the correct documentation. It is the same for the risers, which I will probably have to take off when it comes to inspection time. This means that if I can avoid changing brake lines it is easier. I guess I want to know if it is a problem if other lines (clutch and throttle) are tight. For normal riding (which is 99% of the time), I don't think there is a problem as none of the lines are under tension and it is only under full lock that that the throttle cables are tight, although they are not increasing revs. I am wondering at what point (how much the handlebars are raised/moved back) people have felt it necessary to modify the cable routing or change them.
 

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When I was researching risers for mine I remember seeing a post that said there is a goodly amount of adjustment available for the throttle cables, you just have to remove the tank and air box to get to them. (Sorry can't find post.)

I haven't done it yet as I had to extend the brake line, but when I do I plan on just having the tank and air box off so I can get everything the way I want in one go.
 

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I put the 2"/50mm Rox Risers on my 2013 Glee. I didn't have to re-route the throttle cables, but I did have to re-route the clutch cable and install a 2"/50mm brake line extension.
 

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Cable Re-routing

I put 2" up and back risers on my '14 Glee and had to re-route the throttle cables around the right fork. Brake line was stretched tight on full left turn so replaced with +3 Galfer lines and replaced clutch cable with +3 one.
 

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I did 32 mm (1 1/4") back and 25mm (1") up using your method of disengaging from the cable guide and a "skullduggery" adjustment on the brake line by loosening and slightly moving inward the perch - lever position was still good with regard to the throttle grip.

Might help in your situation....
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Many thanks for all of your comments. Now I know what to do if I find that any of the cables seem to be causing problems. I've been on a couple of long rides and havn't noticed any issues so far.
I think from the comments above, that size of risers is crucial for getting away without having to change cables, and mine with 32mm rise and 40mm back are right on the limit. This information might be useful for those wanting to put risers on their bike. When I get the tank off (when I can face trying to get the trim strips off the tank) I'll have a look and see if I can get a bit of slack from the throttle cables.
I have not felt need for risers on other bikes, like GS1200 and Transalp and wonder why Suzuki don't copy the position of other very successful adventure bikes. It shouldn't really be necessary to add risers to an adventure bike. It can't be a hard thing to get right. Having said all this, I toured for a week on a rented Glee without any problems, but I am more comfortable in my bike now.
 
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I put the 2"/50mm Rox Risers on my 2013 Glee. I didn't have to re-route the throttle cables, but I did have to re-route the clutch cable and install a 2"/50mm brake line extension.
Where did you get a "brake line extension"? Back when I added risers to my 2011 ABS Wee I had to go with the longer brake line option as I couldn't find any way to add an extension to the end of a hose with a banjo fitting.
 

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I installed a set of GenMar 1" up and 1 3/8" back risers on my 2015 650 today and only had to make minor changes. I removed the retainer clip for the brake and throttle lines, re-routed the throttle cables in front of the wiring harness, and bent the clutch cable retainer to get it a little more slack.
 
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