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I took advantage of rainless weather today to finally get out for a bit. The downside was that it was windy ... really windy. I'd say the crosswind was at least 20 mph with 30+ mph gusts. It was very unsettling to feel the bike moving around. At times it felt like I was going to tip over.

I was taught to apply pressure on the bars on the side the wind is blowing from to compensate. It still felt like I was getting blown around the road and like I would get blown over. I had to pull over several times to calm my nerves.

Aside from not riding on windy days, any tips for dealing with strong winds?
 

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Best tip is to relax.

It sounds counterintuitive but the bike naturally wants to keep itself upright so as long as you let it move around it will tend to do so. Your job is to gently guide it in the direction you want to go and allow it to move around a bit.

..Tom
 

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I was taught to apply pressure on the bars on the side the wind is blowing from to compensate. It still felt like I was getting blown around the road and like I would get blown over. I had to pull over several times to calm my nerves.

Aside from not riding on windy days, any tips for dealing with strong winds?
Windy days suck...or is that 'blow'?

When I first started riding I had an ole boy on a harley tell me, 'just let the bike handle it' when I asked him about riding in the wind.
He repeated it a few times and to this day I can almost hear his voice.
That phrase still calms me and reminds me to 'let the bike handle it' if on the other hand, you try to make inputs to counter the wind you will just make it worse.

Loosen your grip, relax your shoulders and ....well, let the bike handle it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the tips! It felt like I was leaning into a turn while going straight!

Crude diagram:

/ <----WIND-----
 

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Thanks for the tips! It felt like I was leaning into a turn while going straight!

Crude diagram:

/ <----WIND-----
If you don't lean a bit the wind will push you into the other lane. Light winds are one thing heavy winds another. I have been through gusts where there was no option but to slow down.

Have a good one.

Brian
 

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Thanks for the tips! It felt like I was leaning into a turn while going straight!

Crude diagram:

/ <----WIND-----
Well, you would have been! That's how you balance the sideways force of the wind. If you try to keep the bike upright it will feel weird and you'll drift out of the lane. Steer as you normally would to go where you want to, and accept whatever lean angle is needed.
 

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I wouldn't say I love riding in winds but I've never had any problems with it .
I've never thought much about it but all the tips here are what I do .
Good luck I'm not sure how long you've been riding ,but it will all fall into place .
 

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Another thing to remember is that a loaded bike is "more" top heavy. Wind will have a greater effect on a top heavy bike than a bike with a lower center of gravity.

Brian
 

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Another thing to remember is that a loaded bike is "more" top heavy. Wind will have a greater effect on a top heavy bike than a bike with a lower center of gravity.

Brian
Not really.

A tall bike will be affected more than a low bike, but if two bikes that are equally tall had different centres of gravity the one with the lower one will react more to the wind.

..Tom
 

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The best part about riding on a very windy day is STOPPING for the day.
Lots of memories of those type of days. And I have to say, it's nice reliving them in the comfort of my home, where it is NOT WINDY.
 

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I took advantage of rainless weather today to finally get out for a bit. The downside was that it was windy ... really windy. I'd say the crosswind was at least 20 mph with 30+ mph gusts. It was very unsettling to feel the bike moving around. At times it felt like I was going to tip over.

I was taught to apply pressure on the bars on the side the wind is blowing from to compensate. It still felt like I was getting blown around the road and like I would get blown over. I had to pull over several times to calm my nerves.

Aside from not riding on windy days, any tips for dealing with
strong winds?

Like everybody has said the bike wants to track straight if you let it.

My opinion (and I've taken some gruff for it!) is that the bike leans into the wind by itself. You can demonstrate this phenomenon by spinning a bicycle wheel and holding it sideways in front of a fan. The wheel tips into the wind.

Much the same on the motorcycle. As long as you don't try to counteract the lean the motorcycle continues to travel straight for the most part. The spinning wheels act as gyroscopes and stabilize the bike.

Try this the next time you're in the wind. Let go of the left grip. Have a very relaxed right grip. Don't try to weight the bike with your feet or push with you knees. Watch what happens. Wind blows bike leans, wind lets up the bike stands back up. Bike is much calmer also.

Hmm... almost like it's correcting itself. :grin2:
 

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Not really.

A tall bike will be affected more than a low bike, but if two bikes that are equally tall had different centres of gravity the one with the lower one will react more to the wind.

..Tom
That is interesting. Curious to know how the lower COG causes more movement in the wind.
 

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Take the speed down a notch. Instead of 80 on interstate, go 70.

This will give you a bit more time to react to shifting lanes.
 

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High wind is hard work. A couple of weeks ago I made a run from Las Vegas to Key West FL and back. About 6100 miles. On the way back between San Antonio and El Paso I ran into about 600-700 miles of very high winds, head on and off the right front. Big trucks were running 45-60 on an 80MPH interstate IH-10.

My little Wee was leaning to the right most of the way, gas mileage dropped to 25 mpg for over 300 miles of the trip. When I stopped for gas I noticed the clean wear area of the rear tire was about three finger widths wider on the right side of center than the left. I was so glad to get to right outside El Paso where the wind died down to 10-15 mphs. Glad there was no rain and temp was in the hight 30's to low 40's or it could have been uncomfortable.
V-Tour
 

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Personally i don't overthink it and just lean against the wind, adjusting to direction changes. But when road signs are flying across the highway, i admit defeat and stop for the night in Colorado :D
 

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I have also noticed that in the cold the windshield makes nice bubble of somewhat still air as I roll down the highway and I can stay comfortable although by no means warm. It seems like even a relatively modest side wind disrupts this bubble and I feel exposed to the full force of the air as the bikes moves through it and I freeze. I don't know how much of this is my imagination and how much is real, but either way. I feel cold when I am in a side wind.
 
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