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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everybody.

As the winter is approaching, i was wondering a couple of things.

1. Do you normally ride your bike during the winter? and if so, 2. Do you change the tires or continue with the ones you normally use?

I'm new to this changing tires for winter and i've seen that now every car has them on, however i've never heard anything about winter tires for bikes. I'm mostly worried about getting a fine, here in Switzerland they like to fine for every single mistake you can make and one of those for sure will be expensive.

I don't care much about the cold, i just drive usually few minutes between work and home and i don't plan to drive on the snow. However is so much easier to take the bike than to wait for the bus and the changes and all the boring stuff.

If you have any suggestions i'll appreciate them.

By the way my Wee has Michelin road pilot 2 on the back and road pilot in the front.

Thanks,

Me.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Check you local laws to make sure. That being said, it's a rare biker that rides in snow and car tire changes are about avoiding getting stuck in snow. Since you plan not to ride on snow, you just need to handle the legal question. The problem with motorcycles in snow is staying upright rather than getting stuck so I would be surprised if there was any law involved with winter motorcycles but I have been surprised before.
 

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Actually, GW, winter tires are not solely designed to be driven/ridden in snow. They typically contain a lot more silica than A/S tires to keep them soft in lower/freezing temperatures - as we all know, the more pliable the tire, the better the traction. So they provide a lot more traction than all season tires in cold weather on dry roads.
Winter tires also feature different tread patterns, with multiple cross section cuts called lamels, that spread under load and bite into the surface (slush, snow or ice) to add more traction.

Many riders in Northern and Central Europe, that I have seen, run winter specific rubber - especially those delivery guys on scooters. In some places, they even stud those tires, but that is illegal in most countries unless there is snow covering the roads.

Many EU countries have local laws that mandate the use of winter tires from late fall until early spring. Not sure how that applies to motorcycles though, or Switzerland for that matter.

I think that if you limit your riding to dry roads in the winter, and take into account the reduced amount of traction due to colder, less sticky tires, you should be fine keeping the bike upright. The legality of that is something you will have to check locally.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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That's really car tire information. My Pilot roads do very well on all paved surfaces and temperatures short of ice and snow. They are advertised as having 100% silica reinforcing fillers.
 

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I ride year round. Of course I live in California so it's pleasant all year.:thumbup:
 

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I use carbide studded knobby tires on my bicycle in the winter [nokian 294's] - they suck on pavement, but grip like crazy on ice. The studs don't dig into concrete at all and make for some sketchy high speed cornering on pavement. I would imagine motorbike tires w/ studs would behave similarly - - is that so?
 

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I use carbide studded knobby tires on my bicycle in the winter [nokian 294's] - they suck on pavement, but grip like crazy on ice. The studs don't dig into concrete at all and make for some sketchy high speed cornering on pavement. I would imagine motorbike tires w/ studs would behave similarly - - is that so?
my theory is stud the center knobs, you not gonna lean much on snow & ice, leave the outside knobs rubber for those days you might be able to drag a knee on dry pavement

works well in practice, front tire stays plated on northern New England frozen gravel, packed snow, ice and scimpily sanded roads, while I can't go as fast as in the summer, I can maintain speeds = or > traffic

rear tire is kinda skechy with 1000 cc, I have found that a heavier car tire works best for the rear





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I just don't have the cojones to ride in the winter. My bikes are hibernating until warmer weather.
 

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Ride as long as the roads aren't iced over. Tried a little ice last year and didn't work out so well. :mrgreen:
 

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Winter riding

Paris is perhaps not as cold as Zurich but I'm reasonably sure that no one changes tires and there are quite a few bikes on the road all winter here. In 5years of living here, I've been caught out in the snow once, and on icy roads a couple times. About 3 years ago I was riding up to the airport north of Paris and it started snowing. I moved as far right as possible and cruised along with my hazard lights on. There was quite a bit of traffic, so if you fell off you would probably get run over.
 
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