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Discussion Starter #1
So got a dl650, been reading like crazy and driving whenever I can in whatever weather. Been raining pretty good the last two days. Ha borrowed my dads Olympia ast which has done very well even though seems very big. No leaks. Still a toss up for jacket(seems to be between olympia and teken, just need to find a teken). Pants are Olympia for sure.

Have noticed in The rain that the handle heaters are a neccessity, are the eBay version of these items good enough?

Boot covers(currently researching) seem To be a good idea, I just wear construction boots but they don't do well in rain and speed(soaked), any opnions on covers are appreciated.

Final question, chain soaks the hell out of my left foot. Anyone come across a fix for this(have searched)?

Thanks in advance.

Ivan
 

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If you are going to ride in all weather conditions the proper riding gear is mandatory. Wet and cold do not work. There are dozens of choices of very good textile jackets, jacket liners, heated jacket liners, balaclavas, waterproof boots, waterproof gloves, etc. Invest in the good stuff and you'll be glad you did.

For me: Joe Rocket Revolution gloves (warm, waterproof), First Gear Rainier jacket (warm, waterproof, with a hood), First Gear heated jacket liner (warm), Alpine Stars Web Goretex boots (warm, waterproof), Smartwool socks (warm), Joe Rocket overpants (warm, waterproof).

During the summer rain and wet still mean cold. A rain jacket over even a mesh jacket makes a world of difference.
 

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Frogg Toggs "Road Toad" suits are awesome...makes ANY gear rainproof, they stow light, are breathable, and are reasonably priced. Can be had in hi-viz, and they have reflective piping. In the rain, visibility stinks so think about that part of it too! ($60 street price)

I have some AXO Neoprene gloves I use in heavy downpours, they're like a wetsuit really warm too. My boots are Goretex & waterproof, but boot covers are a good option.

For heated grips, get the latest version of the Oxford Heaterz, they are a great solution and cheaper than most OEM-style grips. Love mine.
 

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For me: Joe Rocket Revolution gloves (warm, waterproof), First Gear Rainier jacket (warm, waterproof, with a hood), First Gear heated jacket liner (warm), Alpine Stars Web Goretex boots (warm, waterproof), Smartwool socks (warm), Joe Rocket overpants (warm, waterproof).
Almost my wardrobe. :)

+1 on the Alpine Stars. Mine get cleaned and waxed once or twice a year. I ride in everything, and they do NOT leak, period.

First Gear stuff is outstanding value. Get used to broken zipper pulls; I replace them with cable ties. Clean it properly (Nikwax TechWash). Other than that, the stuff lasts for years.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Excellent info, any of you run into the spray on right foot from chain? Any extra protection like a shield for it?
 

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I use Aerostitch Roadcrafter pants (13 yrs old), a Darien jacket (2 yrs old), Sidi goretex boots (6 yrs old) and Stearns foam rubber riding gloves.

Returned home from Branson a couple of weeks ago (540 miles), rain and gusty winds almost all the way (from light to heavy), and I stayed completely dry.

Ride safe.
 

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I ride year round in the PNW and rain is part of the ride many times. I don't like heated grips that much they don't do much up here with rain and cold, as I wear insulated gloves with over gloves. That keeps my hands warm but I can't feel the heat from grips, at least on my FJR OEM ones. As far as your feet get some tall real waterproof boots with a sole that will not like on the wet pavement watch for paint it is very slippery. I am the CFO of a motorcycle boot company and some things to look for more stitching is not good. It creates holes in the leather that lead to leaks. The reason that do it is thread is cheap. We use polypropylene on ours and the boots are sealed at the seams too. Every 10th set of boots is soaked in a tub of water for 2 hours looking for leaks to ensure each batch is sound. Some of the liners claim to use a breathable liner. While correct, they do nothing to move the moisture away from your foot. Look for one that will. Also look if it can be resoled. A good pair of boots is not cheap. However the cost can be offset by resoling and getting a longer life. As far as outerwear layers and i wear frog toggs over it all ( mostly my one piece riding suit) Rain riding can be comfortable and enjoyable or a miserable experience. It is the gear IMO.
 

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Also look if it can be resoled. A good pair of boots is not cheap. However the cost can be offset by resoling and getting a longer life.
With the Alpine Stars, soles are half the problem; the other limiting factor for lifespan is all the velcro. It's not worth the labor to get that replaced and have them re-soled.

That said, I've got about 50k miles out of two pairs so far, which is pretty good, especially considering that I occasionally walk or hike in them for some distance.
 

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With the Alpine Stars, soles are half the problem; the other limiting factor for lifespan is all the velcro. It's not worth the labor to get that replaced and have them re-soled.

That said, I've got about 50k miles out of two pairs so far, which is pretty good, especially considering that I occasionally walk or hike in them for some distance.
The one pair of Alpinestar Web Goretex boots I have has served me well for the 60,000 plus miles and 3.5 years since I got them. They are getting quite beaten up but they remain dry. I have had to put some sticky boot repair stuff on the front where the sole was pulling away a bit but they never leaked. I've learned that for me Tilley Enduarable travel socks keep my feet happy in commuting over Temperatures ranging from 5 degrees F (45 minute commutes) to long rides in the 90's and if my feet did get wet (like when I accidentally allowed my Frogg Toggs to pull up over my boots in heavy rain) my feet still stay acceptably comfortable.


I always used my Frogg Toggs Road Toads with great success until this year; now I have a Aerostich Roadcrafter two piece which has kept me dry over the last 6,000 plus miles since I got it.

..Tom
 

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I commute every day on my Strom, I've pretty much done so for the past few bikes (PC800 & R1100RT). While I've done the "Rain Gear" thing, I've switched completely to waterproof gear all the time (save for gloves) as I don't want to have to stop to put on rain gear.

Helmet: HJC FS-15 with Pin-Lock Face Shield (A Must in the cold and/or rain)
I always wear a Slik head cover, or a balaclava in the real cold weather.
For cooler days I wear a winter Buff, it helps keep the rain spray off my neck.
Olympia Voyager Jacket - Started out waterproof, needs to be re-proofed.
Warm 'N Safe Heated Gloves - These are my "Rain Gloves" of choice.
Aerostich AD 1 Pants (Gore-Tex lined)
Alpinestars Web-GoreTex Boots

I've ridden through all kinds of rain, with the setup above, I remain dry. I have to remain dry, there's no way I could arrive at work with wet clothes.

Up until last year, I'd been wearing a pair of Air Force Issued Combat Boots that I'd sealed up with Sno-Seal. They were NOT waterproof, but had done the trick for the past 8 or so years. After 6 weeks of rain, I replaced them with the Alpinestars.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
With regards to my left ankle, I have assumed it's the chain (could be rear tire) but it seems to be continually sprayed at back right of ankle. I haven't had the balls to look way over the left and see what exactly is going on.

Vey good info I very much appreciate it. I did have an opportunity to try frog togs. Works as stated but I'm 6'5" with abnormally long arms and legs. The jacket seems goo enough but the pants are incredibly short leaving a good 4-6in of pants exposed to elements. I'll look into the boots more, the problem is I want to travel light when hitting bc and do fishing which means boots have to be dual purpose(hiking).

Heated gloves... Clever didn't even occur to me that such a thing existed. I hope they're cheaper than the grips($120+ for some plastic with wires embedded?). I know theres more to em but geez.

So full outfit it is... Spensive.

Out of curiosity any of u guys try the heated vests?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
With regards to my left ankle, I have assumed it's the chain (could be rear tire) but it seems to be continually sprayed at back right of ankle. I haven't had the balls to look way over the left and see what exactly is going on.

Vey good info I very much appreciate it. I did have an opportunity to try frog togs. Works as stated but I'm 6'5" with abnormally long arms and legs. The jacket seems goo enough but the pants are incredibly short leaving a good 4-6in of pants exposed to elements. I'll look into the boots more, the problem is I want to travel light when hitting bc and do fishing which means boots have to be dual purpose(hiking).

Heated gloves... Clever didn't even occur to me that such a thing existed. I hope they're cheaper than the grips($120+ for some plastic with wires embedded?). I know theres more to em but geez.

So full outfit it is... Spensive.

Out of curiosity any of u guys try the heated vests?
 

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Out of curiosity any of u guys try the heated vests?
I have a Gerbing heated vest as well. I've only turned it on once this year (last week to be exact). It is very warm, I really need to get a separate controller for it so that I can turn my gloves up and the jacket down.

My headlights actually pulse when I've got the jacket on. It is only evident at night though.
 

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RE: Heated Vests

I have used a heated vest for over 5 years and have ridden in snow and weather down into the teens for days on end. It was explained to me by the salesman that as long as you keep your body's core warm everything else stays pretty warm. If your body's core temp begins to fall circulation is restricted to the extremities causing cold hands, feet, etc. I have found this to be true.

My vest is a Widder which I don't think is still in business. However, I think the Gerbings are manufactured just off I-5 and just South of Olympia, Washington in a little town of Tumwater in the airport business park. I think they have an outlet since you are riding through, though I have never been there.

With the heated vest, a couple of layers of Walmart long underwear and frog toggs you can be comfortable all winter.
 

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With regards to my left ankle, I have assumed it's the chain (could be rear tire) but it seems to be continually sprayed at back right of ankle. I haven't had the balls to look way over the left and see what exactly is going on.
Just by chance, you didn't happen to forget to put the chain guard back on after cleaning the chain, didja?

+1 on Olympia gear + Alpinestar boots. Not cheap but get a piece here and there when you can.
 

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When new, Frogg Toggs are fantastic. They keep you dry in all but the most biblical downpours, and they pack up small and light. However they are useless after 2 seasons, not waterproof at all, leaking at every seam, but they do breathe. I have a heavy Roadcrafter rainsuit that keeps out rain in everything I've been in, but it's big and heavy, and with no vents at all, if it's warm and humid you will be as wet from sweat as you would have been from the rain. Great in cool rain (below 60deg) or as a windbreak insulation layer when it's really cold.

+1 on the Oxford Heaterz. The are heated velcro wraps that go over your grips in seconds. About half the price of standard heated grips, and highly recommended. I've had a heated vest for about a decade, but since I got the Oxfords, I haven't found the need to plug it in.

I have a set of rubber Totes overgrips. They do keep your boots dry, but are a pain to walk around in. You also can't be putting them on in a hurry ... like the time I did in the Adirondaks in NY, and put them on over my rain pants. When I took them off I was pouring out what seemed like a gallon of collected water.
 

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When new, Frogg Toggs are fantastic. They keep you dry in all but the most biblical downpours, and they pack up small and light. However they are useless after 2 seasons, not waterproof at all, leaking at every seam, but they do breathe. I have a heavy Roadcrafter rainsuit that keeps out rain in everything I've been in, but it's big and heavy, and with no vents at all, if it's warm and humid you will be as wet from sweat as you would have been from the rain. Great in cool rain (below 60deg) or as a windbreak insulation layer when it's really cold.
...
I used my Frogg Toggs for 3 seasons with lots of rain riding and as long as they were put on correctly I stayed dry. (I put on well over 50,000 miles in those three seasons, a lot of that in the rain.)

As for the Roadcrafter (which I now have) if you are finding it gets damp inside and isn't breathing you might want to give it a good cleaning and treat it for waterproofing. When the outside material soaks the Goretex can't breath and you get clammy. Cleaning and re-treating it wil help a great deal.

..Tom

..Tom
 
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