StromTrooper banner
21 - 40 of 83 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
439 Posts
Here's a quick/cheap/easy tip on how to help keep your neck warm when riding in the cold. Get a knit cap (toboggon cap, whatever you call them... they sell them at Walmart for about $1), grab a pair of scissors and cut a slit in the top of the cap. Next time you go riding in cold weather pull that cap down over your head and around your neck right before you put your helmet on. I pull it down far enough so that the top of the cap comes to just below my mouth. The helmet strap helps to hold it all in place. Helps keep your neck warm and helps seal up the bottom of your helmet. Not rocket science but it makes a HUGE difference and it's so cheap and easy to do. Something like one of these... probably not the pink one. :mrgreen:


My rule for myself concerning cold weather riding is: if it's so cold that I'm concentrating more on how [email protected] cold I am than I'm concentrating on staying safe on the ride, then it's too cold for me to ride. I decided years ago to not ride in weather any colder than my age. I turn 44 this month so no riding at temps below 44 degrees. I hope to have to revise that rule soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,709 Posts
I did have a Burgman 650 for a couple of years and it is a great commuter vehicle. Whole body is in the air bubble and legs are together

Straight up drags with 600 sportbikes and it was a tie to 80

In Taiwan they sell weather proof long coats like dusters for scooter riders then stowe them under the seat
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,103 Posts
A balaclava works best. I keep mine over my nose under the helmet breath guard and my nose doesn't even stuff up as badly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,018 Posts
I remembered while reading this that a friend had a lap robe of sorts attached to his GS gas tank that covered his legs and groin. Kinda like chaps for his bike. It stayed on the bike and not on him. That was back in the 90's.
I'm racking the brain to remember if it was a vinyl or leather.
He's in a home now so I can't ask him. Might be a marketable item for the Adventure types.
Oh, looked it up. There is a fabric lap blanket from Langlitz Leather in Oregon.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
103 Posts
Breath guard, whats that? My main issue is my visor fogging, full face helmet of course. I have to keep it open just a tad and that aint good. Will rain X work, whats the solution? Pledge, one guy at work uses spit, not me.

The only other complaint is my fingers, even with heated grips and good gloves the tips of my fingers get cold I (I have the stock handgurds on). I am either going to get hippos of heated gloves to plug in to my warm and safe jacket liner.

Wind, put your rain suit over everything is what I do when its really cold, I use Frog Togs, dont help the fingers and fogging though.
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,103 Posts
Breath guard, whats that? My main issue is my visor fogging, full face helmet of course. I have to keep it open just a tad and that aint good. Will rain X work, whats the solution? Pledge, one guy at work uses spit, not me.
Some helmets have breath guards available. Here's one for an HJC SY-Max for example. Pin-lock shields with a double layer and an air space work better than things like coating with dish detergent. Some shields have a fog free coating. Possibly the best winter helmets are snowmobile helmets. As far as the legs are concerned, insulated motorcycle or snowmobile clothing work best. There is the safety feature as well as warmth involved.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,442 Posts
Dangers of hypothermia

For warmth, keeping the brain warm is very important. If it gets cold, it slows circulation to the extremities to provide itself with more warm blood. and your fingers & toes get cold. Whatever fits under your helmet and keeps your head warm is a help. I use a thin fleece climber's helmet liner. The balaclava is great. For more hand & foot warmth, the chemical heat packs work very well. The toe warmers have an adhesive side and stick to the outside of your sock over the toes before you slide your foot into the boot--some wiggling necessary to get things right. The hand warmers go into your glove over the back of your hand, so that they warm the blood going to your fingers. Carry a couple of these in case your get colder than you planned and have a ways to go before you can get warm.

Keep in mind the dangers of hypothermia. When your body core cools, you don't think well, you don't move well, and you can die even if you don't crash. If you're riding with another, look for these symptoms in them. If any of these occur, get them warm immediately:
Symptoms of Hypothermia

Symptoms to look for are: slurred speech,
lethargy and slow movements
shivering
changes in consciousness
stumbling, mumbling or fumbling
slurred speech or confusion
slow rate of breathing
cold, pale skin
fatigue, lethargy or apathy
lack of motor coordination
Joke away about some of us showing these symptoms often...but when they really happen, they can be deadly.

The Dangers of Hypothermia | Colorado Outing.com
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,442 Posts
Four ways to prevent fogging on the inside of the face shield:
--Divert moist breath away from the shield. The breath guard/breath box can help.
--Ventilate the inside of the face shield to remove the moisture. A helmet skirt that keeps your chin warm may inhibit air flow that removes moisture.
--Dual pane snowmobile face shield if your helmet maker has one that fits your helmet. (The electrically heated shield is needed in freezing fog, etc.)
--Products that cause the moisture to sheet on the inside of the face shield instead of bead. There are factory treatments, Pin Lock, Fog City, chemical treatments (Clarity DeFogIt is working best for me--Cat Crap doesn't work as well), rub on dry soap & buff off, etc. Pledge furniture polish makes moisture bead, so it is good for the outside and the windscreen in rain--moisture beads up & blows away. The sheeting moisture may not provide a completely clear layer to see through, but it's sure better than fog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,458 Posts
Riding in the Yukon a while back in cold rain turning to snow I was OK with a heated vest and regular motorcycle jacket with zip-in quilted liner. But the key was a medium-weight rain outfit (pants and jacket) over all, which effectively kept the wind off.

But you have to be very, very careful. Some years ago when I was young and foolish (OK, foolishER) I was riding at night in northern Mexico in winter, wearing only a jeans and a jeans jacket for warmth. Both the weather and I were getting colder and colder, but I was pretty sure the town I was trying to get to was just a few more minutes down the road. You know how that is.

A couple of times I thought about stopping and running around for a bit to get "warmed up" but ah, hell, it's just few more minutes to town. When I finally got to Sabinas Hidalgo I stopped in front of a hotel and stepped off the bike (Yamaha RD350). Almost instantly I went into what I can only describe as convulsions as the cold blood that was pooled in my legs hit my core. I could not even get the bike onto its sidestand I was so out of control physically, and just let it drop on the curb. I staggered into the hotel, and though I couldn't walk or talk very well the desk clerk saw my distress and helped me to a room. I somehow got into the shower and stayed there under the hot water until I was red as a lobster...but when I got out after some minutes I immediately began to shake uncontrollably again. It took another long session under the hot water before I could get over to the bed and wrap up in blankets. Finally under control after some hours I was able to go out and park the bike.

In retrospect this was a very close call. If I had 1) stopped out on the desert to exercise I could never have gotten back on the bike and started it again; or 2) if the hotel had not had a boiler the size of a locomotive's I'm not sure I could have stopped what was already irreversible (without an outside heat source) hypothermia.

Moral: you may think you are just very cold. But you might be dying.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,025 Posts
A balaclava works best. I keep mine over my nose under the helmet breath guard and my nose doesn't even stuff up as badly.
I have more hair than you. Combined with my fat head, the neck gaiter works best for me, but even then, some have a better shape and fit than others. I like the bank robber tapered shape far better than the tube style.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
The only other complaint is my fingers, even with heated grips and good gloves the tips of my fingers get cold I (I have the stock handgurds on). I am either going to get hippos of heated gloves to plug in to my warm and safe jacket liner.
.
Get the Hippo Hands. 2 weeks ago I left at 9am and 34 deg for a 3 hour ride straight up I 81 to Scranton. I didn't stop for 2 hrs and that was for gas, but I was getting cold at my core and the hands go next. I stopped at the Frackville exit and it is typically much colder for maybe 20 min there but for the rest of the ride no cold. I'm also wearing a good winter glove under the Hippos. Rev'it Orion GTX. They are pricey, but worth it. I paid $150 last yr but looks like now they are going for $169. This combo with the Hippo Hands has kept me warm in the low 20s with high winds and with just the Rev'it gloves I don't even need the hippos till the 30s. I've done shorter rides in the 20s without the hippos, but on longer rides my finger tips will get cold after a while. They (hippos) fold up pretty flat so it's pretty easy to don them if decide mid ride.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,846 Posts
the toughest time is at gas stops, taking gloves off to get card from wallet and swipe pump, put gloves back on before pumping or they become frost bit quickly
I've become fairly accomplished at filling up without removing the gloves. It does make a big difference but you have to get used to operating the pin pad through bulky fingers. Probably if I wanted, and used longer leads, I could even stay plugged into the bike.
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,103 Posts
I have more hair than you. Combined with my fat head, the neck gaiter works best for me, but even then, some have a better shape and fit than others. I like the bank robber tapered shape far better than the tube style.
I wore a Balaclava when I looked like these pics. It may be hard to see in monochrome but that is hair sticking out the back of the helmet on the Can-Am shot. My best winter helmet back then was a Simpson car racing helmet though. It had a Nomex liner with built in breath guard and neck cover that was designed to keep fire off. It worked well for wind too. Now I wear a Large Helmet in warm weather and an XL when wearing the heavy Balaclava.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
And the balaclavas with coolmax type headliners like the one I posted really don't add bulk.... so go ahead and squeeze your flowing locks in there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,450 Posts
I've become fairly accomplished at filling up without removing the gloves. It does make a big difference but you have to get used to operating the pin pad through bulky fingers. Probably if I wanted, and used longer leads, I could even stay plugged into the bike.
I have a hard enuf time with keypads bare hands, call me banana fingers, trying on gloves you'd thing I was doing an OJ in the courtroom imitation

I've been considering going to coiled cords on my gear & autocom leads so that I can stretch a little further away, I ALWAYS dismount when fueling

Klim balaclava. It's the greatest! Head part is Coolmax so it doesn't compromise helmet fit and the neck and back area is made of Gore Windstopper. Tucked in under your layers and jacket and nothing gets through. I've worn it in the 20s in total comfort. I have some technical outdoor wear that is windstopper and it's amazing stuff.


Bikers Comfort in Action balaclava is pretty much same thing, 100% agree, awesome for even the coldest





Never pay again for live sex! | Hot girls doing naughty stuff for free! | Chat for free!
 
21 - 40 of 83 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top