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Bike is a 2013 Wee ABS Adventure...has had recall done for 'updated' stator already and no pre-existing issues charging, etc. I've done some LED light conversions (except for headlight bulbs and that's a possible option down the road) and am just trying to make sure I'm not maxing things out should I hook up a heated jacket liner and run heated grips, etc.

I tried searching but can't quite come up with the answers I'm looking for...

So I got Jacks's (Roadstercycle) SuperKit with the SH775. He has sorta of generic "one size fits all" wiring instructions and a mention or two of a 5-wire hookup, but I have questions specific to the Wee...

On mine, there are 7 wires coming out of the stock RR...no plug in, just 'hardwired' in there. There are three solid blacks, two black w/ red stripes and two black w/ white strips...all appear to be about the same gauge although the solid balcks might be a shade heavier.

Looking at the service manual (the real Suzuki version), it shows the same combo of wires. However, downstream somewhere in the wiring harness, it appears that there are a couple of plugs and the three black wires change over to three yellow wires which then go on to the stator.

So.....let's see if I've got this right before I go snipping wires!

1. Cut ALL seven wires as close as possible to the stock RR.

2. Splice the three yellow wires from the SH775 plug to the three solid black wires that go to the stator. Order is NOT important...any new yellow to any existing motorcycle black wire that was cut out of the stock RR., etc.

3. "Deadhead" the two black w/red stripes and black w/white stripes with some dead-end crimp connectors (or similar...I'm assuming that somewhere in those four leftover wires, there's at least one existing hot from the battery) and tape those four wires up and out of the way somewhere.

4. Finally, route the new heavier gauge black and red on the second SH775 plug directly the battery and mount the new RR.

Does that sound like a plan???? :grin2:

Thanks in advance!
 

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Looking at the service manual (the real Suzuki version), it shows the same combo of wires. However, downstream somewhere in the wiring harness, it appears that there are a couple of plugs and the three black wires change over to three yellow wires which then go on to the stator.
It's been awhile since I did my 650 but if I remember right there are 2 connectors tucked up behind the frame by the rectifier. Kind of hard to get to. I took off the tank and it was still kind of a pain but doable.

1 connector goes to the stator and has yellow wires. I spliced (soldered) those wires into the new rectifier. Leave enough slack!

The other connector goes into the wiring harness. I just taped over that one so it wouldn't be hanging exposed.

No need to cut the wires on the OEM rectifier unless you're just mad at it!
 

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I ended up buying the OEM connectors off two websites. One was Eastern Beaver and the other was CycleTerminal. The connectors you need are the male 4 pin MT-90 and the male 3 pin .250 CNA connectors. I ordered a set of each from both sites. My memory is a little fuzzy but I believe I split the big red\black wires from the rectifier to two pairs in order to feed them into the 4 pin connector. The three yellow wires connected straight to the .250 CNA connector without a hitch.

I found a picture of how I did the Red\Black but not the yellows:
 

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By the way, connecting the RR directly to the battery is a bad idea because if the 30amp fuse ever blows then your bike will suddenly be without power. This is because your RR now connects to the wrong side of the 30 amp fuse.
 

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Point taken, Toadster...

Where would you suggest those ground and hot leads get wired to, then?
 

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Point taken, Toadster...

Where would you suggest those ground and hot leads get wired to, then?
Did you notice my second last post? I bought the OEM connectors and attached them to the wires coming from the RR. Going through the OEM wiring harness seems like the safest way to do it, IMO. I'd just hate to be cruising down a busy highway when that 30amp fuse decides to blow.
 

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By the way, connecting the RR directly to the battery is a bad idea because if the 30amp fuse ever blows then your bike will suddenly be without power. This is because your RR now connects to the wrong side of the 30 amp fuse.

Wrong side of the fuse? What does that mean?

If the main fuse blows the bike stops regardless how the rectifier/regulator is connected. The Roadster harness has a auto resetting relay BTW.
 

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Wrong side of the fuse? What does that mean?

If the main fuse blows the bike stops regardless how the rectifier/regulator is connected. The Roadster harness has a auto resetting relay BTW.
On a stock setup, the RR connects to the main power between the bike and the 30 amp fuse. If you connect the RR to the battery then the RR is now connected between the battery and 30 amp fuse.

The difference is that if you connect the RR directly to the battery and you are riding down the highway and the 30 amp fuse trips due to a short somewhere, your bike will lose all power. No throttle. no ABS, no lights, etc. With the stock setup, the RR can still power the bike if the 30 amp fuse were to blow.
 

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I hope I didn't kill the thread. Most people connect their new RR to their battery but I'm not sure everyone realizes it changes the electrical design of the bike. I was hoping to inform others on what the difference was and what the other option was (connecting through the OEM connectors and where to get them).
 

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I ended up buying the OEM connectors off two websites. One was Eastern Beaver and the other was CycleTerminal. The connectors you need are the male 4 pin MT-90 and the male 3 pin .250 CNA connectors. I ordered a set of each from both sites. My memory is a little fuzzy but I believe I split the big red\black wires from the rectifier to two pairs in order to feed them into the 4 pin connector. The three yellow wires connected straight to the .250 CNA connector without a hitch.

I found a picture of how I did the Red\Black but not the yellows:
If I see what I think I see, it looks like you used some sort of fitting to split the huge 10-ga wire from the Roadstercycle kit into two smaller-gage wires, so that you could re-use an OEM-style connector to plug into bike harness (so as not to connect directly to the battery).

What is that fitting and where did you get it? It's a crimp-type thing yes? And what is covering it? I've never seen clear heatshrink tubing. Also what size wire did you use going into the 4-place connector?

I'm assuming you did something similar with the yellow wires, yes? IIRC the ones supplied in the Roadstercycle kit are also 10 ga. A fellow Stromtrooper was kind enough to send me some spare blade terminals, which I crimped & soldered on to the 10 ga. yellow wire ends, then shoehorned into the OEM connector (salvaged from the OE R/R). It worked - but only just, and it's a bit inelegant.

I'm not sure what size wire is truly appropriate for the yellow wires. Maybe 14 AWG? 10 ga. is not only overkill, but creates a fit issue if you want to re-use the original plug housings.
 

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I hope I didn't kill the thread. Most people connect their new RR to their battery but I'm not sure everyone realizes it changes the electrical design of the bike. I was hoping to inform others on what the difference was and what the other option was (connecting through the OEM connectors and where to get them).

I looked at the wiring diagram and you're right for the most part. Seems like the bike will keep running if the main fuse blows. I don't think that the ABS will work though as the actuator valve is on the "other" side of the fuse. Might not get the ABS light on the dash.

It does look like Suzuki engineered the circuit with "safety" in mind.

As to whether one should be concerned about the main fuse blowing while riding I don't think so. It would take some sort of short in the harness that would only show up at speed? Don't know. Typically it's the starter pulling excess current or a dead short type event applying power to the bike up that would blow the fuse.
 

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If I see what I think I see, it looks like you used some sort of fitting to split the huge 10-ga wire from the Roadstercycle kit into two smaller-gage wires, so that you could re-use an OEM-style connector to plug into bike harness (so as not to connect directly to the battery).

What is that fitting and where did you get it? It's a crimp-type thing yes? And what is covering it? I've never seen clear heatshrink tubing. Also what size wire did you use going into the 4-place connector?

I'm assuming you did something similar with the yellow wires, yes? IIRC the ones supplied in the Roadstercycle kit are also 10 ga. A fellow Stromtrooper was kind enough to send me some spare blade terminals, which I crimped & soldered on to the 10 ga. yellow wire ends, then shoehorned into the OEM connector (salvaged from the OE R/R). It worked - but only just, and it's a bit inelegant.

I'm not sure what size wire is truly appropriate for the yellow wires. Maybe 14 AWG? 10 ga. is not only overkill, but creates a fit issue if you want to re-use the original plug housings.
The fitting that connects the Roadstercycle kit to the 4 smaller 14 gauge wires is a heat shrinkable multi-wire butt connector. There are probably more elegant solutions but this seemed to be the best option for me at the time. Once you have the wires crimped into the connector the transparent plastic acts as a heat shrink and like a sealant\glue.

The yellow Roadstercycle wires are 10 gauge and I agree that they are complete overkill. They barely fit in the .250 CNA connector tabs and actually probably didn't crimp the best due to there being too much copper. In fact, I might have even eliminated a few strands first (since 10 gauge is too much anyway).

If I were to do it again I wouldn't buy the Roadstercycle connectors all wired up. I'd just buy the connectors and use my own 12 - 14 gauge wire.
 

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The fitting that connects the Roadstercycle kit to the 4 smaller 14 gauge wires is a heat shrinkable multi-wire butt connector. There are probably more elegant solutions but this seemed to be the best option for me at the time. Once you have the wires crimped into the connector the transparent plastic acts as a heat shrink and like a sealant\glue.

The yellow Roadstercycle wires are 10 gauge and I agree that they are complete overkill. They barely fit in the .250 CNA connector tabs and actually probably didn't crimp the best due to there being too much copper. In fact, I might have even eliminated a few strands first (since 10 gauge is too much anyway).

If I were to do it again I wouldn't buy the Roadstercycle connectors all wired up. I'd just buy the connectors and use my own 12 - 14 gauge wire.
Thanks!

If/when I get around to fixing the inelegance, I'd likely use these to step down the 10 ga. wires to a more reasonable size:

https://www.amazon.com/16-14-Step-Down-Heat-Shrink-Splice-Terminals/dp/B00NVCMN68

Comes in a 10 pack and I need 5, so there's plenty of room for screwups. :)
 
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