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Good find :thumbup:

The Best part -:var_14:

Our introduction to the bike had only brief off-road time, but it was enough to demonstrate that it is a legitimate candidate for real adventure rides.



Looking forward to seeing the full write up in April issue.
 

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I've never been on the dirt, but this article does point out that this non-GS non-KTM actually does ok on the dirt. Wow. Very cool. He does mention that the bars are flexible. What's the history here? I've heard of you experienced V Strommers changing the bars out for aluminum bars and so on. Has there been a history of bar problems or is this an issue for those heading off for real into terrain.

Thoughts??


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I've never been on the dirt, but this article does point out that this non-GS non-KTM actually does ok on the dirt. Wow. Very cool. He does mention that the bars are flexible. What's the history here? I've heard of you experienced V Strommers changing the bars out for aluminum bars and so on. Has there been a history of bar problems or is this an issue for those heading off for real into terrain.

Thoughts??


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On my Vee I replaced the OEM bars with Pro Taper ATV high bars. I didn't particularly hate the style of the OEM bars but I didn't like the amount of flex they produced. They seemed to transmit every bump in the road, in the dirt it was worse. It seemed partly caused by the harsh front end which has poor compression damping. Alloy bars sure made an improvement, a bit more rigid but more ability to soak up bumps and vibes. I've also read that the OEM bars are fairly weak and bend easily when the inevitable happens. I was hoping that the problem with flexy bars had been resolved but at the end of the day replacement bars are cheap so no big deal.

Cheers,

Tony
 

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I've never been on the dirt, but this article does point out that this non-GS non-KTM actually does ok on the dirt. Wow. Very cool. He does mention that the bars are flexible. What's the history here? I've heard of you experienced V Strommers changing the bars out for aluminum bars and so on. Has there been a history of bar problems or is this an issue for those heading off for real into terrain.

Thoughts??


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Throughout time most bars that come stock on Japanese bikes have been made of the finest cheese money can buy.:green_lol:
They're just mild steel. If the bike falls and the bar hits its going to bend. I imagine that also translates to being able to feel flex under some conditions which explains the popularity of the oversized aluminum bars.
Ya gotta remember Dirt Bike is used to testing dirt bikes.
"on a good day it can hang with a Yamaha Super Tenere." Frankly, I don't consider that encouraging since the Yamaha got ragged on for lack of power. Disturbing.
 

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Seriously a dirt bike magazine reviewing a vstrom - if anyone ask for evidence of advertising $$$ influencing contents- this is it.
 

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Seriously a dirt bike magazine reviewing a vstrom - if anyone ask for evidence of advertising $$$ influencing contents- this is it.
ADB (Australasian Dirt Bike) Magazine just did a review of the Tenere's (660 & 1200) and have also previously done a review of the DL650L2 model when it came out.

The Strom falls squarely into the motorcycle adventure category (whether or not the individual owner decides to take it off the road, or just stick to the black stuff) so it's natural that a "dirt" bike magazine gives it a review.

If you think that this is advertising dollars/influence at work, you are absolutely correct.

Suzuki has a job. That job is to sell motorcycles. If they decide to give the journalists/writers/testers of a dirt bike magazine a bike to review, so that the exposure for the new V-Strom 1000 is maximised across all the genres of motorcycling, not just the road/touring segment, than great :thumbup:

This could easily backfire on them, but it appears in this case that the bike held it's own and gets a great review on it's limited off-road capabilities. Many journalists these days won't hold back if they don't like something, as evidenced by some UK reviews recently.

The more diverse riders that see this bike the better, means more sales. More sales means much more choices in accessories, aftermarket parts etc..
 

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Zede,

I love my Glee strom and like the new V. But i doubt most of the Aust Dirt Bike Mag audience would seriously consider it as a real dual sport. More of a case of so Suzuki Aust can say even Dirt Bike Mag reviewer thought it wasnt too bad- to add to their credibility. when was the last time any australian bike journals have a real bad word to say of any MC they review which is current at the time of review.

I suppose it is entirely possible that a very capable dirt bike rider can buy one, ride the sh&t out of it in the face of the ST10, GS & Tiger XC crowd.
 

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I remember when DIRTBIKE tested the first BMW GS and pretty much slammed it.

PS the Harley Electra Glide test was hilarious back in the day, also. :biggrinjester:
 

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I've never been on the dirt, but this article does point out that this non-GS non-KTM actually does ok on the dirt. Wow. Very cool. He does mention that the bars are flexible. What's the history here? I've heard of you experienced V Strommers changing the bars out for aluminum bars and so on. Has there been a history of bar problems or is this an issue for those heading off for real into terrain.

Thoughts??
If you are going to save money, I like it to be in the easy to replace sections of a bike. Many people replace things like bars anyway, just for ergo's.

So fine, save money by chucking cheap bars, tires, levers on the thing, rather than expensive bits that grenade at the slightest whiff of stress.

At least now it's just the bars and not the whole front.
 

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Ya gotta remember Dirt Bike is used to testing dirt bikes.
"on a good day it can hang with a Yamaha Super Tenere." Frankly, I don't consider that encouraging since the Yamaha got ragged on for lack of power. Disturbing.
Not by people who own it though and use it off road. The motor works really well there AND on the road up to almost double legal speed. Oh dear it starts tapering off at 180Km/h. Shame, everyone rides around at that speed.

Unless you have mistaken the Strom for a track bike, it will be a big improvement from the old one in the real world. Some won't like the lack of grunt at 10,000RPM, but most will appreciate the long torque curve and economy that returns in the real world.

If you think it's meant for the track, yes you will be disappointed.
 

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Seriously a dirt bike magazine reviewing a vstrom - if anyone ask for evidence of advertising $$$ influencing contents- this is it.
Interesting point.

I would add that the article also took a credibility hit when it said the following:

"...The motor was redesigned almost from scratch....about all that remains...is the 90-degree v-twin configuration..."

Slightly bigger bore, yes. Retuned for low-mid torque, yes.

But almost redesigned from scratch? That tells me the writers have little idea what they're talking about and didn't bother doing much research on the Strom.
 

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Has there been a history of bar problems or is this an issue for those heading off for real into terrain.
I've owned a 2003 DL1000, presently own a 2007, and have sat on the 2014 at the bike show. I'm not Superman, but I could easily flex the stock bars with my bare hands on all three.

The stock bars are pure junk. A downright embarrasment on an otherwise great bike.

Throughout time most bars that come stock on Japanese bikes have been made of the finest cheese money can buy. They're just mild steel.
Just being mild steel doesn't excuse them. Yes, historically speaking mild steel bars have been common on Japanese bikes. But not wet-noodle flexi-flyer bars like the stock DL1000.

They actually flex with, magnify, and reiterate several times every impact with a highway expansion joint or other minor road rough spot. As if not bad enough, the matter is exacerbated by burdening them with trendy bar end weights to amplify the rubber-band gyrations. Pure garbage. You could bend them by picking up the bike, let alone laying it down. So no, this is not just an off-road thing. (Egads, that's a scary thought!)

Even bargain-buyer targeted bikes with any measure of off-road intention (ex: Suzuki DR650; Kawasaki KLR650) come with much stronger steel bars and have a crossbar. Nowadays, crossbar-free tapered alloy bars are seen even on bikes like the still-comparitively modest DRZ400 dualsport. I don't think I've seen bars as wimpy as those on the V-Strom since the (infinitely more appropriate) 1970 Honda CT70 Mini-Trail.

If they were free, they'd be a waste of money. I have two sets in the shed I'd give away if I had a despised enemy and thought I could ever sleep at night thereafter. Maybe I'll cut them up some day to make napkin rings. For paper napkins. But thin-wall half-inch PVC would probably be stronger.

The stock bars are mere showroom decorations; temporary display fittings to hold up the grips. Right at the top of the list of things to replace immediately upon acquiring a V-Strom.

Were this not so genteel an environment, I might tell you what I really think about them. ;-)

JET
 

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Interesting point.

I would add that the article also took a credibility hit when it said the following:

"...The motor was redesigned almost from scratch....about all that remains...is the 90-degree v-twin configuration..."

Slightly bigger bore, yes. Retuned for low-mid torque, yes.

But almost redesigned from scratch? That tells me the writers have little idea what they're talking about and didn't bother doing much research on the Strom.
According to Suzuki
Nearly all internal parts have been extensively redesigned
There is (at least) a new block, new head, new cams, new valves, new pistons, new rods, new stator housing, new exhaust system, new clutch and some new gears and a new EFI system.

They may have kept the crank and starter motor, A few bolts, cam gears and the timing chain (Maybe)

If that classifies as a minor tweak then, fugg me, I'd love to see what you think is a major one.
 

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According to Suzuki


There is (at least) a new block, new head, new cams, new valves, new pistons, new rods, new stator housing, new exhaust system, new clutch and some new gears and a new EFI system.

They may have kept the crank and starter motor, A few bolts, cam gears and the timing chain (Maybe)

If that classifies as a minor tweak then, fugg me, I'd love to see what you think is a major one.
My definition of almost redesigned "from scratch" would be something like the 2014 Yamaha FZ-09 inline 3, or the 1997 TL1000s V-twin. I mean didn't exist before in general design. Maybe a better definition would be how the most recnt BMW R1200GS went from air-cooled to water-cooled along with the other new engine items

If you don't see the 2014 V-Strom motor as an evolution of the prior version, than we don't see things the same way, which is the nature of forums like this of course.

I just don't automatically buy it when manufacturers use the marketing term "all new" (Suzuki's words from their site), because most of the time that's what it is -- a marketing term.

How about if we agree on "significantly revised and updated" (btw, I never used the word "tweak")
 

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My definition of almost redesigned "from scratch" would be something like the 2014 Yamaha FZ-09
Nah, Sorry that's an 1978 XS850 motor with a new block, new head, new cams, new valves, new pistons, new rods, new stator housing, new exhaust system, new clutch, new gears, new fuel system stuck in a new frame. :mrgreen:

As an engineer type, All I see in the new motor is a motor that required almost 95% the work to get up and into production as a new new motor with a bunch of bean counters following them around asking them to justify each nut and bolt. No point changing to a different configuration of engine. It's a good configuration.

The new BMW, motor is about the same, so why differentiate it. Because they 35% water cooled it and bought it 35% into the 1980's. The BMW marketing machine is strong.

That guy from the dirt bike Mag was pretty much just repeating what he had been told in the press brief, just as the press did with the new BMW. Everyone is willing to lap it up on the BMW though. So no I won't agree that the reviewer has any cred problem at all in that regard.
 

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If the example you gave requires roughly the same (“… almost 95% the work to get up and into production as a new new moto…) engineering resources including conceptualization, design, testing, and production, I’m not going to argue with you (I’m not the engineer-type), but I still find it hard to believe unless I actually saw the budget and various numbers in front of me (I’m the inquisitive marketing-type, not afraid of numbers).

Do you have those numbers by chance?

Ha, ha, just kidding, I'm having flashbacks to the last systems conversion I worked on in which the software engineers assured us things would be done by a certain date utilizing a specific amount of resources, it wasn't until we pulled back the sheets did we find out otherwise.

.....That guy from the dirt bike Mag was pretty much just repeating what he had been told in the press brief, just as the press did with the new BMW. Everyone is willing to lap it up on the BMW though. So no I won't agree that the reviewer has any cred problem at all in that regard.
Oh yeah, I'm sure this particular journalist repeated what he had been told in the press brief. That's totally how the entire article felt as I was reading it. But that's not how all journalists write -- some actually research, compare, question, and challenge what they've been given. This guy didn't, which is part of why I didn't find him so credible. Roadracing World is one publication that seems more rigorously critical (no, I'm not saying they tested the V-Strom).

If you want the last word, go ahead, you've worn me out. Ride safe. :thumbup:
 

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Roadracing World is one publication that seems more rigorously critical (no, I'm not saying they tested the V-Strom).
I'm looking forward to the engine tear down, laser measurements and metallurgical tests they do to confirm what Suzuki is saying. :mrgreen:

So, does anyone actually do that. No. They mostly look at the outside and see whether there are any differences and take the word of the manufacturer, regardless. So there is no proof one way or the other apart from their level of advertising, bias, and cynicism which will vary depending on a number of factors.

If you want the last word, go ahead, you've worn me out. Ride safe. :thumbup:
OK then since you insist. :mrgreen:

All I am saying is that even if you just change a bore size, the way things are made these days this usually requires a bit more than just bigger pistons and a bigger cutting tool in the workshop, a lot of stuff has to go into each part and each change usually has an effect on another part, unless you want "more character" then you just cut corners and cross fingers.
 
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