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Discussion Starter #1
I've seen several posts about chains, and all of them suggest grinding the heads off a link pin and pressing it out. But this got me wondering...

If I'm replacing a worn-out chain, why go through the effort of pressing pins? Is there any reason I couldn't (or shouldn't) just cut the side plates with a cutoff-wheel and be done with it?
 

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Some people do it that way, but I'd rather press the pins out and use the old chain to pull the new one into position.

I change sprockets first and then pull the new chain.
 

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The old-time Harley guys used to keep a set of bolt-cutters for that purpose. I guess they use scissors nowadays.
 

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If you have a cut-off wheel for your grinder, do it. One less step, but have a sturdy hand so when the chain falls apart you don't slip and mar the finish on your swingarm.:yesnod: Feeding new chain thru is easy as heck.
Your chain wear pad is in nice shape, right?
Dave
 

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I use a cut-off wheel on the bottom run of the chain to prevent swingarm damage.
 

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This is how I have always done it. Never had any need to "pull" the new chain into position.
It's a very fast way to do it if you don't change sprockets at the same time. Ten minutes maybe.
 

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I've seen several posts about chains, and all of them suggest grinding the heads off a link pin and pressing it out. But this got me wondering...

If I'm replacing a worn-out chain, why go through the effort of pressing pins? Is there any reason I couldn't (or shouldn't) just cut the side plates with a cutoff-wheel and be done with it?
I used a cutoff wheel on my angle grinder - no problems.
 

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If you are changing sprockets, make sure you loosen them BEFORE cutting the chain off!
 

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Unless you're selling the bike to a stranger later that day, why on earth WOULDN'T you change sprockets when you change the chain? :confused:
 

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If the sprockets have no observable wear on the pressure side of the teeth, there is nothing to gain from changing them.

Some folks will run the set until complete destruction, the chain stretched so far that the pitch is off and the sprockets are getting worn at an accelerated rate. If you monitor the system and note that the chain is needing more frequent adjustments, take the chain out of service and inspect clean the sprockets and determine if changing the cogs is required or not. If the sprocket shows no percieved wear, and the pitch from face to face is very close to as new, put on a new chain and maintain it as normal. You should get 2 chains with one set of cogs, sometimes the front cog (sprocket) will not make it though and you'll need to a change sometime down the line.

I'm doing a chain this weekend, not sprockets. The bike is out of service until the chain arrives. I'm KLR-ing it! I have 18,500 miles on that chain and it suddenly needed adjusted, and a week later it was back loose... so I stopped riding it. Throw it away and replace.

Larry
 

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If you are changing sprockets, make sure you loosen them BEFORE cutting the chain off!
True. Put bike in neutral, lock rear brake, spin off front sprocket nut.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
True. Put bike in neutral, lock rear brake, spin off front sprocket nut.
OK, dumb question: Why neutral? What's wrong with putting it in gear? I realize it likely needs the aid of the rear brake to hold it from turning against compression alone, but you specified neutral, I'm guessing for a reason?
 

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The rear brake is plenty strong to hold the sprocket from turning. With the bike in neutral there is zero chance of damaging transmission internals.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The rear brake is plenty strong to hold the sprocket from turning. With the bike in neutral there is zero chance of damaging transmission internals.
Furthering the divergence from the original post... What possible damage could occur to the transmission internals and how could it happen from simply removing the sprocket nut relying on engine compression to hold the shaft?
 

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With the bike in 1st gear and a big ol' impact wrench hammering away on a 27 or 32mm nut until it breaks loose, it can be a little hard on the 1st gear teeth so why risk it when all ya gotta do is wedge a 2x4 between the brake pedal and the footpeg to lock the rear wheel and then use the old chain and sprockets you're gonna toss anyway for leverage.

That's the longest sentence I've typed in a while.
 

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x2 Kick

And on a side note, never trailor a bike in gear. Always put it in neutral.....always.
 

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Back on topic. I like to take about 5 seconds and use the plasma.
 

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