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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi everyone!

I have a 2008 DL650, just wondering how hard is it to remove the front and rear wheels?
I have a bit of mechanical knowledge and a standard toolbox, along with the owners manual.

Just wondering from people who have done it, how hard it was and any troubles that i should be cautious of.

I have just graduated uni and looking to save some coin by removing wheels myself to get tires changed before oiur big central Australia trip (putting on K60's).

Thanks guys!!
 

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It can be done, but it's tough.

If you havn't changed a m/cycle tire yourself in the past I'd suggest putting it in the too hard basket.

Quite easy to gouge the rim or cut the bead leaving you seriously out of pocket.

It's possible/safe to get the tires off with a centre stand, difficult without. I have a centre stand, have changed bike tires in the past and I and consider paying someone else to do it money well spent. Admitted, I'm not broke and just out of uni - but even balancing the potential costs from screwing up, it's not a good bet.

I'm sure there are people here who've done it and will say "no worries". I helped with a KTM 990 rear last weekend in mud. (Used my size-9's and some technique to break the bead and loaned my electric air pump - otherwise mostly stood around carefully avoiding doing any of the hard stuff myself) but there's a lot of technique in doing it successfully and unless there's someone with you who can run you though it there seems little point in telling you how to drop the precariously balanced bike as well to make matters even worse ;)

Pete
 

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Are you looking at changing the rubber yourself(complete DIY) or just taking the wheels(rubber stays on the rim) off to get changed by an expert(save a little money)?

Cheers!
 

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If I were planning a central Australia trip I'd want to know that I'd done everything possible to make the bike bullet-proof for the trip. The last thing I'd want is to be let down by something I'd done in the preparation of the bike that I should have spent a few bucks on to have done properly.

I'm with Pete on this one. Let the pros handle it. Like, how were you planning on balancing the wheels after you'd fitted the tyres? Plenty of other stuff you can do -- and use new crush washers when you're doing your oil changes, another area of false economy with potentially disastrous consequences... A mild inconvenience at home can be a major drama out there.
 

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Are you importing the tyres at a very reduced cost ? a lot are and there in lies the problem,getting them fitted,on your budget mate if you screw a rim the trip may be over,I'm hearing you both my sons have done the uni thing.What is the charge for fitting if you take the wheels in ?.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the responses!

I am only looking to remove the wheels (sorry first post was very misleading) I got quoted $60 a pop to change a tyre if i rode the bike in, and somewhere else quoted $25 if i bring the wheel in and they will change the tyre.

That saving can pay for the K&N i just bought.........bikes are expensive :yesnod:
 

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The rear is doable, the front quite difficult.

The problem is that without the centre stand there's not much under a DL that makes a good lift point, so unless you can attach a strap to the roof somewhere to hold the bike up you'll probably drop it.

Rear:
By the rear axle you'll see a couple of bolt holes, those are intended to have spools for a pit stand screwed into them, but you can jut put a bolt through, tilt the bike slightly on the side stand and jam a carefully calibrated lump of wood in there (Helps if it has a notch in it so it won't slip) and support the rear of the bike with the wheel off the ground. Undo the axle nut BEFORE you get the bike up.

A wood or plastic wedge between the brake pads to stop them from pushing out is advisable - otherwise they'll move out and make it a bitch to get the wheel back on.

Front:

Not so easy. With the rear wheel on a car scissor jack will lift the front, but it's really unstable and you need added weight on the rear, I used a sack of cement on the pillion seat. With the rear wheel off, no clue how you'd manage it.

Pete
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Sorry this is all information I should have given,my bike does have a centerstand so stability as far as i can tell shouldnt really be an issue
 

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Discussion Starter #10
After all this found a stockist of the heidenau K60s that will fit them if i ride the bike in for only $25 more then if i took them to the other bloke with just the wheels.

that seems like a winner to me!

Thanks for all the help guys i really appreciate it!:thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Why they so bad?

I got it so i didnt have to carry mulitple filters, and could just wash this one out??
 

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Why they so bad?

I got it so i didnt have to carry mulitple filters, and could just wash this one out??
The filter material is very coarse and gets even coarser as the oil drains/ dries out of it, sucking through bigger and bigger particles.

For that kind of terrain it would also be a good idea to grease up (bearing grease or Vaseline) the airbox-rubber seal , both sides, to make sure of a 100% seal... the plastic walls of the airbox flex when hot and when bumping along 100s of k's of corrugation, allowing intermittent and temporary entry of dust.

Look at Seal Savers and things more practical and usefull for a trip like that.
 

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Hi Mech, a lot of shops will provide free fitting & balance if you buy your tyres from them. Some tips are to take note of your current rear wheel setting on the swing arm as your starting point for chain tension after re-install & also once you remove your brakes don't touch any levers.*
P.s. vaseline & some greases break down rubber,(dont ask how I know this) make sure you use an inert sealant on rubber seals.
 

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P.s. vaseline & some greases break down rubber,(dont ask how I know this) make sure you use an inert sealant on rubber seals.

Depends entirely on the type of "rubber".
Neither Vaseline nor standard bearing grease affect the Strom airbox seals.
The last 10 years of use have pretty much proven that.
(and yes, still using the seals the bikes initially came with).
 

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Depends entirely on the type of "rubber".
Neither Vaseline nor standard bearing grease affect the Strom airbox seals.
The last 10 years of use have pretty much proven that.
(and yes, still using the seals the bikes initially came with).
Thanks GlitchOz, I guess 10 years proves the strom seal is OK, as Mech (and myself) would like to save money a bit o Vaseline or Grease is cheaper than the Airfilter grease at about $10 a tube.
Rocket Industries - K&N SEALING GREASE 6oz TUBE DO NOT USE W/CLAMP ON FILTERS K&N - 99-0704 claims it resists heat and will not melt or run off.
 

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K60 Heidies

I'm pleased to know you don't plan to change the k60 tyres yourself as you might need a few hours working out in a gym first. Those tyre sidewalls are tough to remove or to put on.They are first class choice for an outback adventure. Where do you plan to travel? Unless you go way offroad you may be surprised just how good outback dirt roads are.But check with outback police on state of roads after the wet weather thru Aust. Choose the wrong road or wrong timing and you may have a REAL adventure. Generally it's fairly easy........except for sand, bulldust, wildlife, heat, dust, flies,lumpy bed etc:mrgreen: Have fun enjoy and ride safe, have you dirt riding experience?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Is there a reliable cheaper option to the K60s?

long story but loks like im going to prolly taking the wheels off myself, WHEELS only tyres to be done professionally and I have a center stand.....should be interesting :p

Rode dirt bikes, but this is the heaviest bike I have ever ridden on dirt and this is the first major dirt ride.

Rode up to newcastle for the weekend 2 weeks ago to do some riding on stockton beach to spend some time on the sand to build up experience.

I'm pretty keen for the trip head up to camerons corner, strez, maree, cooper, ayers rock, loop road around kings canyon....very keen!
 

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The original k60 was a tough very long lasting tyre so per km are cheap to run. Current k60 scout is reported to be a little softer therefor less milage. It would be my choice for intended use. Bit noisy but still o.k. Mefo is same under the skin I have read and may be a little cheaper.
It doesn't seem you are going bush, I mean real bush, so it will be easy if you can handle dirt. Most,but not all main roads are now sealed.

Tips;If you meet up with roadtrains get completely off the road or you'll get showered with rocks or most probably run over.
Stock and wildlife; If you see or smell carcasses thats when you should slow down...it's a bad area. It's obvious but the numbers tell the story.

Don't forget...lots of pics. (sez me who has yet to post a pic, I know.... I'm slack)

S.5
 

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Discussion Starter #20
MEFO? I didnt think they had an offering in 150 - R17?

Im not to worried about the trip, I know no matter what comes up we will be able to handle it.

Thanks for the advance on the road train though!
 
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