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Discussion Starter #1
Sorry for the long read:

Time for real world math and conditions... Except I may not not qualified and need some insight.

Facts that I currently think are right. Corrections are welcome:
* Stock/OEM R/R accepts full output from the bike and shunts excess electricity as heat. Heat damages R/R as well as possible the magnets?
* Mosfet kit to replace R/R with a "better" device. Apparently the Mosfet R/R handles excess power more efficiently and does not generate as much heat, puts out better and more steady voltage which is all around good for the bikes systems.
* Xenon lights (the set I am looking at) draw 35 watts instead of the stock 55 watts. Less power draw is good, maybe?
* LEDs instead of incandescent bulbs draw less (minimal I know...) which is good, maybe?

Problem intro: Stock or the Mosfet R/R dissipates excess energy in the form of heat. In electronics, heat=bad. SO....If I goto Xenons, LEDs, and don't have any other electrical accessories turned on, I have more excess amps/watts/volts to dissipate VS stock setup lights. This should equal more heat than stock, right?

I am concerned that a too low of a electrical load is actually detrimental to to the R/R due to the excess heat it needs to generate to shunt off excess energy WHILE NOT RUNNING ANY EXTRA ELECTRICAL ACCESSORIES. Those of us with GPS, music, radar, heated accessories, and on-board coffee pots have plenty of extra load.

Is there any validity to my concern? If so, I just justified me purchasing aux LEDs to draw a few more amps :thumbup:
 

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Looking at the Shindengen spec sheet:

FH020 is rated at 35A: just about all the magneto can generate, so running a little under stock draw shouldn't be a problem.

My FH012 is never more than warm to touch.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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If your primary concern is keeping the stator cool, go to a series R/R. The heat goes to it instead of the stator. Be sure to mount it in the airstream.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
If your primary concern is keeping the stator cool, go to a series R/R. The heat goes to it instead of the stator. Be sure to mount it in the airstream.
Is the fh020 a series r/r? I need to educate myself a little better.

Is the stock one not designed to shunt much power? Maybe suzuki never envisioned power needs decreasing after delivery.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Looking at the Shindengen spec sheet:

FH020 is rated at 35A: just about all the magneto can generate, so running a little under stock draw shouldn't be a problem.

My FH012 is never more than warm to touch.
Thanks for the reply. That is good to hear! I wouldn't think the newer model would preform any less .
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Is the fh020 a series r/r? I need to educate myself a little better.

Is the stock one not designed to shunt much power? Maybe suzuki never envisioned power needs decreasing after delivery.
That is not a series rectifier. Part of the equation is where the heat is created. That one runs cool because, though control is more precise, much of the excess heat goes to the stator where the oil is supposed to take it away but failed stators normally fail high where they don't get as much oil.

CE 605 SB Series regulator/rectifier is the series R/R at Roadstercycle-Index

It dumps the excess heat into the R/R cooling fins and is easiest on the stator so the R/R itself gets the heat.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Does this mean the MOSFET R/R I installed puts more thermal load on the stator?
More than a series, not more than stock AFAIK. I don't think I've ever read of a stator failure with a MOSFET R/R. I'm just saying a series R/R sends the least heat to the stator.
 

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"The shunt regulator is called 'shunt' because it litterally puts a shunt across two stator outputs each time the voltage exceeds a certain limit. The first time I heard about this principle I refused to believe that anything so stupid had been designed but I was proven wrong. The shunt regulator can be constructed with lower production cost and has hence been chosen as standard, even if it means much higher current loading on the stator windings.

"I will not present any regulator diagrams in this article, but just shortly describe the operational principle of the shunt regulator:
The shunt regulator uses high shorting currents in the stator windings to create an extra rotating magnetic field counteracting the rotating field from the permanent magnet. The resulting magnetic field is hence reduced and so are the induced voltages. The high shorting currents causes extra heat dissipation in the stator windings and are probably the reason for having high failure rates on this component."
Alternator Tutorial - Motorcycle Do It Yourself Article

"Series Regulators unload your stator but the heat has to go somewhere, the regulator is where it ends up!! These series regulators have to be in the airflow so get them out in front if you can. Don't put them under your seat or tail section they need cooling. "
http://roadstercycle.com/Roadstercycle New Series Regulators.htm

The stock SCR shunt rectifier/regulator works for most of us for years and years. The Shindigen MOSFET shunt R/R gives better voltage regulation and might live longer. Has anyone tried the series R/R on our bikes? The magnet problem seems to be a Vee problem.

What to do? Don't worry, especially Wee riders. Vee riders might check the magnets. Has anyone running very low load reported a failure?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
A shunt r/r, whether stock or mosfet, shunt/shorts the excess power back intot he stator. I Guess i don't see how the Mosfet could be any differenti than Stock.

The series regulator seems to be the answer I guess???
 
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