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What Kinda Bike Is That?
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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone tried a custom dash/electronics layout? I am contemplating the idea of of building a new dash for my DL-650 and moving around the guages. My goal is to try and make room for a sunlight readable monitor, (displaying a 12v pc source), or one of the new, (non-sunlight readable), Atom based mini notebooks, (Asus 901 or MSI Wind).

I am used to doing this kind of work. It is what I do for a living in the boatbuilding industry. The hope is, to be able to run a robust navigational system, (street maps & topo maps), along with other software programs, (Photoshop, Vegas), that would dovetail into a long journey on my bike.

Here is a sample monitor. http://www.12voltpc.com/ccp0-prodshow/xENARC_702tsv.html

Thanks,

Barry B.
 

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WOW , that looks cool..........and yet veeerrry expensivvvvve:rolleyes:

I would love to see the end product though!!!!!:D
on the upgrade program of late , Hows the new suspension treating you Barry??
 

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Not to be a caveman or anything but read the last line of your signature.

The are a lot cheaper, won't run down your battery and can easily be seen in bright light. LOL:rolleyes: Not quite as handy after dark but still manageable.

Just a suggestion...might put the adventure back in "adventure riding".;)
 

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What Kinda Bike Is That?
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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
WOW , that looks cool..........and yet veeerrry expensivvvvve:rolleyes:

I would love to see the end product though!!!!!:D
on the upgrade program of late , Hows the new suspension treating you Barry??
Very well thank you. The riding that I did on Sunday, over a myriad of surfaces, was very helpful in letting me assess and tweak things. I am learning that it is a fine line between street riding and off road riding in adjusting the suspension. I still have more tweaking to do, but I am very happy with the new setup. (I installed a Hyperpro 460 from Klaus. Klaus and Dee were wonderful to deal with. Former Wilber's dealer and really knows their stuff about shocks.). The jury is out on just how much Race Tech emulators help though. Total PITA to adjust once they are installed. Because of this, I haven't bothered to, but probably will take a quarter turn off of them at some point in the near future.

On my long slog home on Rt 2 on Sunday, I came to a couple of "Pavement Ends" signs. Having been stuck behind a line of cars for several miles with no chance to pass, I figured this was my best chance. Up on the pegs, twist the throttle back and flew by a long line of cars that were slowly making their way over the washboard road that was in the middle of a major repair. I'm willing to bet that if I looked into my mirrors, I would see a couple of "one finger salutes" because I did this, AND also a few others who were thinking wistfully, "Man, I wish I could do that."

All in all, I am very happy with the new system. The rear shock cost me $614 delivered to my door. About 1/2 hour install with absolutely no fit issues whatsoever. AND, setup with my preload and rebound settings already dialed in with the info that I provided Klaus. The shock was truly a "plug and play" experience. I took photos and hope to post something in the near future.

Just sort of consumed with wrestling with how to put some sort of computer on board this bike.............. :weapons_90: (hard work for a small brain that I have.)
 

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What Kinda Bike Is That?
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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Not to be a caveman or anything but read the last line of your signature.

The are a lot cheaper, won't run down your battery and can easily be seen in bright light. LOL:rolleyes: Not quite as handy after dark but still manageable.

Just a suggestion...might put the adventure back in "adventure riding".;)
I always carry paper maps with me for backup. But, paper maps are published at resolutions that show more common roads for a given area. If you have worked with a GPS, you know that one of the wonderful things that you can do with it is, ZOOM in on a given area and roads that you never knew were there, appear out of no where. It is THESE roads that I try and find and ride on. Sometimes I can make it through, sometimes I hit a dead end, (more dead ends in the US then in Canada). That's the adventure.

I have had a lot of fun doing this and have seen places that only "locals" to that specific area know about.

It is also an adventure to get into one of these places and have the electronics quit............. Hasn't happened yet, but with the amount of miles I travel and places I go, my number is up!!!!

Example: This past weekend, a road not on a map, but on my Mio C-520 GPS


And sometimes.........


You have to know when to turn around........


But we sure thought about it real hard for awhile!!!!!!!

Also, a good GPS will provide you with other infomation that a printed map can't. In the case of the DL-650, my GPS will give me my actual correct speed and not the incorrect speed as displayed by the OEM speedometer. (The pic is a little blurry. But heck, it was a one hand shot at 73 mph.). Visually, I have speed in miles or km, distance of the trip I am riding in miles or km, ETA, current time, Points of Interest and a host of other options to select from, (I can even play videos and listen to music. I don't do this while riding though.).


Paper maps are darn good at what they do and an invaluable source of information and a backup. Electronics enhance the adventure experience to a whole new level of enjoyment.


Barry B.
 

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I always carry paper maps with me for backup. But, paper maps are published at resolutions that show more common roads for a given area. If you have worked with a GPS, you know that one of the wonderful things that you can do with it is, ZOOM in on a given area and roads that you never knew were there, appear out of no where. It is THESE roads that I try and find and ride on. Sometimes I can make it through, sometimes I hit a dead end, (more dead ends in the US then in Canada). That's the adventure.

I have had a lot of fun doing this and have seen places that only "locals" to that specific area know about.

It is also an adventure to get into one of these places and have the electronics quit............. Hasn't happened yet, but with the amount of miles I travel and places I go, my number is up!!!!

Example: This past weekend, a road not on a map, but on my Mio C-520 GPS


And sometimes.........


You have to know when to turn around........


But we sure thought about it real hard for awhile!!!!!!!

Also, a good GPS will provide you with other infomation that a printed map can't. In the case of the DL-650, my GPS will give me my actual correct speed and not the incorrect speed as displayed by the OEM speedometer. (The pic is a little blurry. But heck, it was a one hand shot at 73 mph.). Visually, I have speed in miles or km, distance of the trip I am riding in miles or km, ETA, current time, Points of Interest and a host of other options to select from, (I can even play videos and listen to music. I don't do this while riding though.).


Paper maps are darn good at what they do and an invaluable source of information and a backup. Electronics enhance the adventure experience to a whole new level of enjoyment.


Barry B.
Uh, it was mostly a joke.
I do have to admit I prefer maps to a GPS but I usually get good quality TOPO maps if I am going "exploring". I don't do that much on my V. Usually take my truck if I am going serious off roading. Had a GPS crap out more than once and I am not a big fan. I also don't mind being "lost" have found some of the most fascinating places that way. My thoughts Tomaato/tomato just have fun I really don't care how you do it. No intent to do anything but rib you a little.
 

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What Kinda Bike Is That?
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Discussion Starter #7
Uh, it was mostly a joke.
My thoughts Tomaato/tomato just have fun I really don't care how you do it. No intent to do anything but rib you a little.
I understand your comments and understood your "ribbing" from your original post.

It was a coincidence that I happened to be looking at my pictures from last weekend's trip, thinking of GPS "upgrade/replacement" solutions, and reading your post. I figured it was a great opportunity to toss up some info for folks to read who might be on the "fence" about GPS systems on a bike. With what you can do with a GPS, they literally, significantly expand a rider's horizon!

Rib On! :D

Ride Safe.

Barry B.
 
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