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Discussion Starter #1
I'm in the process of installing a Signal Dynamics Brake Hold Module on my K7 Wee. It requires taking a signal from the speed sensor wire.

That got me to looking at the Basic Strom Wiring 101 info which showed the speed sensor signal could also be used for a cruise control, Pro Oiler or Datatool Digi Gear. Not that I will add all of these farkels in the future but I might want to add one or more of them, time will tell.

That brings me to my question: Aside from the basic cut, strip, twist, solder, heat shrink, ugly method, is there a more elegant or recommended method for tapping off a signal line one or multiple times?

I have searched but didn't come up with anything.
 

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I have never used one, but I have heard good things about something called Posi-Tap. I think I read of them on WebBikeWorld.com IIRC.
 

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Log onto Easternbeaver.com.........plug and play kits for all things electrical and electronic for these bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the suggestions.

I have heard good things about something called Posi-Tap
I've used a Posi-Tap before on another application. They're adequate for the job but IMO they're bulky. I'm looking for something smaller for this application if possible. They are definitely an alternative.


Log onto Easternbeaver.com.........plug and play kits for all things electrical and electronic for these bikes.
I've already installed EB's headlight relay kit and his PC8 fuse block. I checked the site but didn't find a P&P solution for this application and the small amount of terminals and connectors wouldn't be cost effective considering the shipping cost for small orders.

I've got some ideas. It'll take about a week or so to get the materials in and get everything installed.

If there are any other suggestions, it would be great to hear them before I go down my own meandering path.

Thanks again.:smile2:
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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You only need to tap the wire once. Then you can use the one tap to run a power distribution block to feed the other connections or just connect to the wire itself.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You only need to tap the wire once. Then you can use the one tap to run a power distribution block to feed the other connections or just connect to the wire itself.
Thanks GW. Those are the two options I've been considering. Leaning toward the latter since I don't know for sure at this time if I will eventually install the other farkles. The cruise control would be nice to have though.

While I'm here asking for suggestions, do you have a suggestion where I can find information about wire/cable identification and management? The PO had installed several LED strips front and back, some of which I have removed and some of which I kept but, he left quite a few rats nests of wiring. In addition to removing some of the wiring for the removed LED strips, I had to redo some of the connections that were faulty.

Going forward, I would like to clean up his wiring and keep my own additions organized.

Thanks again.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Sorry for the confusing choice of words. Basic Strom Wiring 101 is a good source of identifying various OEM wires and connectors. I'm looking for recommended or best practice methods to identify and manage my wiring going forward.

I don't have access to the various colored wires used on the Wee so as I add or change wiring I will be using a limited number of wire colors that may make it difficult to identify a correct wire. I'd like to make it a simple and clean as possible to identify and work on the wiring down the road, literally and figuratively.

I did find this on a boating website that looks like a good labeling/identification method. Wire Labeling Photo Gallery by Compass Marine How To at pbase.com There may be other, perhaps better, methods.

The boating website has a couple other pages that also look to be useful for my purposes.

Terminating Small Wires Photo Gallery by Compass Marine How To at pbase.com
Marine Wire Termination Photo Gallery by Compass Marine How To at pbase.com

That leaves me with finding recommendations for managing the wires going from one point to another. I've seen wires just zip-tied to OEM wire bundles and whatever solid pieces are nearby, others run inside various types of protective sleeves; mesh type fabric, vinyl tubing, split flexible tubing. Is there any source for recommended methods or best practices for running and protecting (managing) the wiring I'm adding?
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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I usually use split flex tubing from the local home center. Despite good intentions though, I get overexcited when wiring and it winds up looking like this.

 

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I usually use split flex tubing from the local home center. Despite good intentions though, I get overexcited when wiring and it winds up looking like this.
I don't see any labeling. Do you have the wiring diagrammed somewhere or do you just remember where every wire goes? I don't think my memory is that good.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Well, all the black wires are ground wires. All the red wires are hot. The buses on the battery are one ground and one hot. The relay sockets come with colored wires. The wire function can be determined from the device connections. I did have to remember where devices, including relays, were added but I remember where things are that I've had my hands on to work with. The hot bus on the battery does have an SW scratched on one end of the plastic cover to indicate which end has a pair of switched connections. The connections on the PC8 fuse block are labeled. I will admit a second owner may be taken aback but I've not heard from the owner of the Glee and have only done a small amount of follow up on the Wee. Besides, I can answer most questions here on what wire colors do what because of the wiring I've done so I can easily read the wiring diagrams and mostly remember what colors do what job.

It may look messy but I've never had a wiring problem other than a few cold solder taps and a broken wire on the older Wee. In one case, I managed to flow solder along a new wire wrapped around a bike wire without flowing onto the bike's wire to pick up the speedo signal for the CCS100 cruise control. In another case, I used a four conductor microphone connector on the Wee's heated gear connector and was short on solder content and temperature. Finally, a wire broke in a connection between the CCS100's control pad and servo due to movement in a solder joint when the handlebars moved.

It was easy to find all the CCS100 connections. The connections from the control pad to the servo were next to the steering yoke. The connections to the bike's wiring were mostly at the bike side of the large connector in the left side of the fairing. I did add a brake relay to allow LED tail lights and all the connections for that were close to the relay. The power connections were marked on the PC8.

I applied some lessons learned on the Wee to the Glee. I watched for solder to flow from the added wire to the bike wire when tapping in. I added a stiff wire taped to the harness on both sides of the joining area at the joint in the cruise control wires near the steering neck so all movement was prevented at the solder joints. I eliminated the bike mounted connector for a heated gear pigtail as well as the pigtail itself. The heated gear connections are folded under the seat so only the inline connections are used, there are no soldered connections in the movable wire area and the wires from bike connect directly to the heated gear.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Sound like a pretty straight forward approach. I may be over-thinking the whole thing. There is no simple problem that I can't come up with an overly complicated solution for.

It sounds like you do mostly if not all soldered connections. When you tap into an OEM wire, do you just strip back some insulation wherever it's accessible and solder your tap onto it? I expect you have a definite methodology for making the taps.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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I strip back a little insulation, poke an awl through the center of the wire and insert the connecting wire into the hole before wrapping the new wire around the bike wire. It provides a better mix of wires than wrapping alone and makes it more difficult to get solder only on the new wire. I made that mistake before.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
I assume you use electrical tape from that point to insulate the tap connection since it doesn't seem possible to get heat shrink on there, or is there another method I'm not aware of?
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Tape works fine. I can't see going through a lot of extra work just to use heat shrink tubing.
 
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