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Discussion Starter #121
Just read the whole epic thread. Looks like a ton of work. On the plus side you will know every bit of the bike. Wondering though, since you can buy a dl1000 for about 2k - do you think it has been worth all the parts you have had to throw at the bike?
Yes and no. Once I have this one together it's going to be reliable, rock solid, and a joy to take out and hammer as much as I want, basically forever. Oil and tires, and an occasional TBS and/or valve check. No guessing or wondering if something is going to bite me unexpectedly. (Most likely I'll get the sasquatch suspension upgrades at some point.) Buying another bike was never a possibility due to only having limited funds at a time. If it *was* an option, knowing what I know now, I wouldn't...I'd fix this one. I spent $4k on this one; was I just going sell it - broken - and lose $3k or more? Who would buy a bike that needs all this work? Plus, any used bike is going to have issues; maybe just as many issues (minus the broken motor) as this bike, so I'd be starting over...*and* I'd need to spend more money (hopefully not $2k!) to bring it up to my (now) standard.

I'd rather have just spent the $169 on a new chain back in Jan '18 and not broken my motor. :)

But, life has no "undo" button.

So I am where I am, with no choice now but to suck it up and fix this thing. Which I shall do. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #122
BTW, my neighbor came over yesterday and saw what I was doing. He ran back home and came back with his impact wrench (battery operated). He held my clutch with a couple rags and told me "hit that bolt" with the impact wrench. 2 short hits, and the 30mm bolt was off.

So, yeah. No excuse at all for me breaking this thing, except for not enough knowledge.

Oh, well; if nothing else, my life can once again serve as a warning for others. :)
 

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I suspect I'm a bit older than you, and while I would have tackled something like this rebuild when I was younger, not any more for at least a few reasons. I admire what you are undertaking here - it's certainly a lot of work, but rewarding and fun in its own way. I've learned a few lessons over the years - just the way you did w/ the clutch basket, and before I try improvised tools or 'my own way' I'll sit and chew things over and try to imagine what can go wrong. I've been known to spend significant bucks ($50 or more) for a tool I'll use once, and I never regret it any more nor do I look back and second guess decisions to do it by the book. Impact wrenches are wonderful - the vibration will break nuts and bolts loose while using a hand wrench can and often does break the bolt (learned that from my auto mechanic). Rusted fasteners can be broken loose by heating til red hot w/ a torch. And so it goes. By the time we get old and are ready to stop doing a lot of this stuff we have most of the answers.

Btw, torque specs are for a clean, oil free nut and bolt. If you anti seize the bolt, reduce the torque setting by 15 to 20%. Same with thread locker. Lubricating the threads allows you to overtighten the fastener. With a click type wrench, you slowly and steadily apply pressure, tightening the nut until it clicks ONCE. Then you are done. Clicking the wrench several times overtightens the nut. Some things must be torqued - engine cases, cylinder heads, etc. There are reasons to use this tool, and few to not use it.
 

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Since we're talking torque specs...through painful experience, I've concluded it is rarely worthwhile to use a torque wrench on anything that calls for less than about 10 lb-ft.

Why? It's too easy to miss the click and over-torque. Also as Ratchet says, by the time you feel the second click, it's already too tight. Good chance to strip threads or break a fastener, and then be very sad.

This is why my "torque spec" on things like the engine casing bolts (the 8mm ones on the stator cover for example) is "hand-tight."
 

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Since we're talking torque specs...through painful experience, I've concluded it is rarely worthwhile to use a torque wrench on anything that calls for less than about 10 lb-ft.

Why? It's too easy to miss the click and over-torque. Also as Ratchet says, by the time you feel the second click, it's already too tight. Good chance to strip threads or break a fastener, and then be very sad.

This is why my "torque spec" on things like the engine casing bolts (the 8mm ones on the stator cover for example) is "hand-tight."
10 lb-fts is 120 in-lbs. I have an in-lb torque wrench with a pointer, not the click type. Easily used accurately down to 40-50 in-lbs, at which point you're pretty much down into hand-tightened with a screwdriver type torque levels. I use this when I tighten my oil drain plug, which is only rated at (IIRC) something like 14 ft-lbs, which my big clicker wrench doesn't go down to (or if it does, it certainly isn't accurate that low in the scale).
 

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Discussion Starter #127
I've been told many times that I don't know when enough is enough, so I qualify for the small in-lbs torque wrench!! :)
 

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Torque wrenches are made in a variety of sizes (and qualities). Just look at the Snap-On catalog. I'm not debating the quality of S-O vs. other brands, simply using them as an example because I used to drool over the catalog. I have, and regularly use my Craftsman 1/2" and 3/8" drive torque wrenches, I have an older 1/4" drive wrench that reads in in-lbs, and I even have a torque screw driver for circuit breakers* (once upon a time some inspectors were insisting on seeing the electrician torque all panel screws - that, like other fads, came and went). I have used the 1/4" one on occasion - when I thought torquing the fastener properly was critical. If the manual does not give a specific torque spec, and the bolt is simply holding two pieces together, I do it by feel. For something like cyl head bolts, frame bolts, brake stuff, its spec all the way. Yes! I have stripped the occasional fastener, but not in years. I've learned not to prove to the fastener I that I can make it wince.

As far as crush washers go, some of them work harden (copper) and if you heat them and quench them then sand them flat, they are good to go again. But they are so cheap (ebay) why bother? I'm not sure about aluminum work hardening, but again, they are cheap enough. Same with oil pan drain bolts. Use a torque wrench a couple of times and you can get a feel for how tight is enough. Never stripped one of those, and new washer every other oil change.

*It is not circuit breaker specific, but that's where I used it most of the time.
 

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I haven't stripped a bolt or thread for many years - but I certainly did during my early bike and car days. There is no substitute for experience.
I have a 3/8" clicker and a 1/4" lb/in clicker, but I still only use them for serious work. I guess I must have learned something during my learning years. :grin2:
 

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Discussion Starter #134
I really gotta get back to work on this bike and posting here...I can sense that you guys are getting bored!!

:var_21:
 

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Discussion Starter #135
Finally working on this again, and immediately come to a point I can't figure out.

Can anybody tell me how to get this sleeve off? Is it supposed to just slide off? Because mine doesn't. I've tried channel lock pliers, rubber mallet, small sledge and screwdriver; this thing doesn't budge. Guess I could try a pipe wrench?

The manual just says "remove it"...no how to.


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It should be a slip fit. Looking at the reddish color of the splines makes me think it is rusted to the shaft. Try penetrating oil and tap around the spacer with a hammer and brass punch or other soft material.
 

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Discussion Starter #137
This happens to be the shaft that bent when my chain broke, so I'm thinking it may be bound up...

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OK, if you cant get the collar off, you can try to slice it with a dremel and crack it with a chisel. This can damage the case if you cut into it or hammer excessively. The manual states the tranny and the crank should remain in the left side case when you split them. since you have to take the trans apart to replace the output shaft, seal and bearing, why not wait until you split the case and drive out the shaft, bearing and collar at that time.
 

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Looking at the parts diagram 1st gear # 14 should slide off the output shaft. In the repair manual it looks as if the counter shaft should come out intact after 1st gear is out of the way. Then the output shaft could be dis-assembled in place. There are three snap rings to remove as you remove gears. The output shaft bearing is held in the case by a retainer plate. Just tryin to help, your results may vary.

https://www.ronayers.com/oemparts/a/suz/508afbc3f870023530722f3e/transmission-model-k4-k5-k6
 

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Discussion Starter #140
Yeah; waiting until I split the case looks like the thing to do. That's going to have to wait until I obtain a 20mm bolt that will get the flywheel off.

Going a little batty here; I work for a couple minutes / hours, then need a tool that takes a couple days to obtain.
 
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