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Discussion Starter #1
Maybe I should open this at a more technical-oriented forum ( :shock: ) but I am sure some of you can/will teach me also here.

I am not familiar with the rule of the rebound damping adjustment screw.

What happens when I screw it in or out (what will I feel)?
In which situation is what the recommended setting?
Anything regarding rider's weight/carried load or quality of road (pavement/gravel)?

I prefer riding on pavement, solo and I like comfort. So far I set the preloads almost to their minimum and I like it.

Manual says almost nothing valuable on that thing and I don't want to dead silly.
 

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Here's my reply from the "Is A Wee Strom Plush" thread:

AndrewG said:
Nobody has mentioned the rebound damping adjustment on the rear shock. Adjustment of this will also affect the degree of jolt transmitted to one's rear.
Not really. Rebound damping controls how fast the shock extends AFTER being compressed. Too little rebound damping results in a pogo'ing feel. Too much rebound damping doesn't let the shock extend fast enough to follow the road and will cause the shock to pack up if you hit multiple bumps in a row.

The usual cause for the sharp jolt is too much compression damping. Basically the shock is trying to compress faster than oil can be squeezed through the internal holes/valves, so it hydro-locks (binds up, stops moving) and the rest of the jolt pushes the rear of the bike upwards. That's where the getting launched out of your seat sharp jolt comes from.

The forks and shocks on the Stroms do not offer any adjustment for compression damping. I have fully adjustable suspension on my sportbike and added a nice Penske to my Triumph. Being able to tweak compression damping is very important to me. I can soften it for the bumpy roads in PA and easily firm it up for track days or twisty blasts in WV.

The best option is to have suspension that offers both high and low speed compression damping adjustments (high end Wilbers, Ohlins, Penske, etc). You can set the low speed compression damping fairly firm for good feedback, yet keep the high speed compression damping at a value that lets it soak up those sharp-edged hits that cause the jolts.

As you mention, damper forks are a real PITA because all you can really do is fiddle with oil weight and level. It's hard/impossible to find an oil weight that will give a nice controlled ride on smooth pavement and not hydro-lock on a sharp hit. Race Tech emulators attempt to solve this and rumor has it they do a pretty good job, but you're still polishing a turd.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
garry said:
Here's my reply from the "Is A Wee Strom Plush" thread:

AndrewG said:
Nobody has mentioned the rebound damping adjustment on the rear shock. Adjustment of this will also affect the degree of jolt transmitted to one's rear.
Not really. Rebound damping controls how fast the shock extends AFTER being compressed. Too little rebound damping results in a pogo'ing feel. Too much rebound damping doesn't let the shock extend fast enough to follow the road and will cause the shock to pack up if you hit multiple bumps in a row.

The usual cause for the sharp jolt is too much compression damping. Basically the shock is trying to compress faster than oil can be squeezed through the internal holes/valves, so it hydro-locks (binds up, stops moving) and the rest of the jolt pushes the rear of the bike upwards. That's where the getting launched out of your seat sharp jolt comes from.

The forks and shocks on the Stroms do not offer any adjustment for compression damping. I have fully adjustable suspension on my sportbike and added a nice Penske to my Triumph. Being able to tweak compression damping is very important to me. I can soften it for the bumpy roads in PA and easily firm it up for track days or twisty blasts in WV.

The best option is to have suspension that offers both high and low speed compression damping adjustments (high end Wilbers, Ohlins, Penske, etc). You can set the low speed compression damping fairly firm for good feedback, yet keep the high speed compression damping at a value that lets it soak up those sharp-edged hits that cause the jolts.

As you mention, damper forks are a real PITA because all you can really do is fiddle with oil weight and level. It's hard/impossible to find an oil weight that will give a nice controlled ride on smooth pavement and not hydro-lock on a sharp hit. Race Tech emulators attempt to solve this and rumor has it they do a pretty good job, but you're still polishing a turd.
Thanks Garry,

I just read your comment in your other post after I opened this thread. :?

Please clear "pogo'ing feel" that I don't understand.

Otherwise I get your explanation and thank you very much!
 

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mokusbajusz said:
Please clear "pogo'ing feel" that I don't understand.
A "pogo stick" is a toy that children ride. They bounce up and down on it (it has a spring loaded bottom). When we say that suspension "pogos" it means it moves up and down multiple times.

So if your bike has too little rebound damping and "pogos", you will hit a bump and the rear end will move up and down a few times before it settles down instead of just sucking the bump. Ideally there is no bounce or jolt: the wheel just smoothly follows the road surface without the seat moving up and down.
 

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Wind the screw all the way in then wind it out 1 complete turn.
Take bike for ride
wind out screw out 1/4 tun
Take bike for ride
Wind screw out 1/4 turn
Take bike for ride
Wind screw out 1/4 turn
Take bike for ride

NOW you should realy know the important thing about this



You should have pasted at least ONE good place to have a drink and lunch at while you make up your mind on what is the best setting, Have a drink for me !
 

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Is it important or not that the adjustments are made on the adjustment screw's clicks, or can the screw be left in any position?
 

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Dear Gary: on my bike, the rebound damping screw is completely jam at full adjustment (all to the right, clock wise). Do you now how I can fix it? or point me to a link were I can go and see what can I do? Thanks in advance.
Dario
 

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10 year old thread and garry hasn't been active since 2008. dont hold your breath waiting for him to answer...

check here: OEM Rebound adjust broken?
 
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