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Discussion Starter #1
Does the abs apply to the rear brake as well as the front? I only use front brakes. It’s a habit I got into from riding sport bikes. I’ve only used the rear 3 or 4 times. I decided to test it while riding the other evening and nothing. I put it on center stand and spun the wheel, hit the brake pedal and it stopped. Original pads no wear. Original disc no wear. fluid looks fine. Now I’m leaning towards abs. I know nothing about abs. It’s an enigma to me. All I know is it saved my arse a few times. Thought?
 

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Yep, there's a tonewheel on the rear brake as well. On the centerstand it may throw the test off since I believe the ECU takes the relative wheel speeds into account - some bikes temporarily disable ABS when you run the bike in gear standing still.

If you want to do a live test, I'd try to lock the rear wheel up in a controlled space like a parking lot. I would take it to 10-15mph in a straight line on level pavement and abruptly give a lot of rear brake pressure to try and lock it up - it should skip a bit.
 

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Depends on the ABS design. Some give a real weird kickback to the pedal. Others provide a smooth application of the brakes with no skidding.
Mine Wee is first generation without ABS.
 

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Vstrom brakes are quite wooden and don't give much feel.

Your rear brake should work like all rear brakes but as the wheel locks up the ABS will release the pressure then apply the pressure again over & over again.

You can test your brakes with out the ABS functioning by removing the 25a ABS fuse, your brakes should function like a bike without ABS.
 

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Coming from sportbikes and track riding, I too started riding my new V2 using the front brake only. I have found that I get much less brake dive from the front end if I use some rear brake judiciously when entering corners to settle the chassis. My Honda VFR used to do this for me by activating one piston on the rear caliper when applying the front brake (linked brakes). Some people love to hate them, but it works well on the VFR in my opinion. I always have the ABS cutting in on the rear brake when I ride on dirt and gravel...

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

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I'm old school, I leave my traction control and ABS shut down 24/7.


My V2 is the only bike I have at this time with these features so I prefer to keep my skill level high rather than relying on the bike.
 

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I'm old school, I leave my traction control and ABS shut down 24/7.

My V2 is the only bike I have at this time with these features so I prefer to keep my skill level high rather than relying on the bike.
I can't comment much on the TC since I have never ridden a bike with it. However, leaving the ABS on does not engage or interfere in any way while doing proper threshold braking.

Old school here too, and yes I can beat the ABS on straight line dry clean pavement. But, make it slick, or throw some sand or debris down and I can't compete with it.

Off road I used to turn the ABS off even on gravel, but I discovered that when blowing an unknown curve, the front ABS actually does a better job than I can in slowing before running out of real estate.
I still would prefer a rear wheel only {off} in those situations and all off in steep downhill loose stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I’m guessing if I pull the fuse and ride it without it I’m going to get crazy warning lights?
 

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It seems to me you first need to figure out if the rear brake is working at all or not. If it has not been used and the fluid has never been changed you may have a compromised ABS module. One method of rectifying it is reported here:
https://www.stromtrooper.com/5404143-post68.html
check for other more detailed posts by by PeteW on the subject.

As a fist step I would look for a parking area with gravel or adjacent to a grassy area and try to engage the front and rear ABS action by over-braking from about 30mph. Just make sur not to dump the bike. You may need many passes but hopefully this may bring the back back to life. If it does change the fluids front and rear (and the clutch fluid for good measure). After the change, go do the ABS exercises again and repeat the fluid changes front and rear. That way you get the crappy old brake fluid out of the ABS module. Harley had a ABS recall because users did not adhere to the recommended service interval and some units failed. Same issues for some of us it seems.
 

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I didn’t know you could get the rear brake to lock up.My brakes must be terrible.
 

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My rear brake was very weak when new. (I could get more braking effect by letting off the throttle than I could by hammering the rear brake.) Even to the point that I suspected the dealership hadn't cleaned off any packing grease meant to prevent corrosion during shipping. Not sure there was any grease, but the rear brake really sucked.

Eventually I pulled the pads and scuffed them with sand paper (keep it as even as possible and I could see a change in their surface as they were sanded). Also cleaned both sides of the rotor with brake cleaner. Seemed to be better right away, and kept getting better with use.

The rear brake seems pretty normal to me now and it will lock up. But in the early days I thought the same thing as you do now.
 
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