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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
[RESOLVED] Rear brake dragging

All,

I have a 2009 DL650 non-ABS. My original brakes were working great, except for squeaking when I stopped. I decided to dissect the brakes and reapply some brake grease.

The fronts went fine, but after dismantling the rear, it seems the rear brakes are dragging. I thought I fixed them, but noticed after riding to work that the rear brakes were fairly hot.

After I got home, I inspected the rears again and the pads were discolored across half of each pad. Rather than mess with those, I bought all new EBC HH pads for front and rear.

Now, the same thing is happening. Here's a rundown:

1. At this point, in neutral with engine off, if I spin the rear tire, it only spins maybe 1/8 - 1/4 turn.
2. Using pliers, gently pull the pad next to the caliper piston away from rotor.
3. Wheel still drags (1/8 - 1/4 turn).
4. Loosen 14mm bolt.
5. Wheel spins very free giving me 1 - 1.5 turns with a light spin. This matches the front wheel.
6. Tighten 14mm bolt on rear caliper.
7. Wheel still spins free.
8. Pump rear brake lever until the pads hit the rotor. Release lever.
9. Wheel is back to not spinning free.

When I replaced the pads, I was able to push the caliber back in with my fingers, so it's free. It seems like the caliper is not releasing enough, but it seems very free.

What gives? I'm about ready to take it to the dealer, but would prefer to get a better understanding of what's going on here.

UPDATE: Noticed another tread here. With the caliper piston in, the brake caliper assembly is able to slide back and forth with ease. After pumping the pedal, the caliper assembly is now rigid and cannot be moved.

I also noticed there are flat spots on the 14mm bolt. I'm sure those don't have to be aligned with anything, do they?
 

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It takes a number of revolutions of the wheel for the rotors to push the pads away. Did you clean and use silicone brake grease on the inside of boot #11 or outside of spacer #10 and the sliding pin portion of bolt #5?

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I didn't even take anything apart for the 12mm bolt (#9). I just removed the bolt and put it back in. I did apply a small amount of grease to the sliding portion of the 14mm bolt (#5).

I took the bike for a quick ride (2,000 feet or so) to the next intersection and back. The rear wheel probably turned 10 - 15 times during that and it still didn't release.

I'm wondering about part #4 (the top spring clip). I put some grease on there too, but that little part kept wanting to fall out.
 

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Hmmm...

I'd check your assembly procedure again paying attention to Greywolf's diagram, check the rear master cylinder for overfilling as you did install new thicker pads check to see if the by-pass port in the slave cylinder isn't plugged and there is sufficient free play at the actuator rod. You'll figure it out, it's a pretty basic system.:yesnod:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well I had the top spring in backward, but it didn't fix it. It is assembled the correct way.

I cleaned everything with brake cleaner and re-applied new brake grease. I took it for another 2000 foot ride and the rear brake rotor got hot while the fronts were still cold.

Where is this return port / slave cylinder? Are you referring to the cylinder the brake pedal pushes on? Since I had the issue with the original pads, I'm wondering if I clogged something by pushing in on the brake caliper piston.

Thanks for the help!
 

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I had a similar problem, when I removed #5 bolt(14mm) & inadvertently cross

threaded it on reassembly(easier to do than you might think) & when I

tightened this bolt the brakes would drag as the caliper assembly would be

pulled ever so slightly out of true.

I'm not saying this is your problem but it's a possibility.

I ended up getting a secondhand caliper from a breakers yard & all was well
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It's funny you mention that. The 14mm bolt is not easy to turn in and out by hand but the 12mm bolt is very easy, so I'm wondering if that's it. I'll have to see what I can find.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The front 14mm bolt was cross-threaded. Replaced with new caliper.

Lesson learned: to remove rear brake caliper, you only need to remove the rear bolt, flip the caliper up and toward the front, and then slide out from the wheel.
 

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The front 14mm bolt was cross-threaded. Replaced with new caliper.

Lesson learned: to remove rear brake caliper, you only need to remove the rear bolt, flip the caliper up and toward the front, and then slide out from the wheel.
Glad to hear you found the problem same as mine

Lesson learned by both you & me, surprisingly easy to crossthread that 14mm

bolt:headbang:
 

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Just to revive this thread...

I wanted to take out the rear wheel for a tire change and did what I normally do, slacken the chain tensioners and axle nut, take off the brake caliper (wrong!) and remove the wheel.

After reinstalling every thing, the rear brake was not dragging, it was nearly like with the brakes on. So after some googling i found this thread and closer examination revelead a cross threaded bolt indeed. How on earth is is possible to cross thread a M10 thread? What kinda cookie dough is the caliper made off?

Anyway i started cursing my self and went looking for a second hand caliper. But if you can cross-thread this piece of sh$#t, you might as well try to re-cross-thread it... and it works :) I suggest never taking this sliding pin out again, but it saved my 50 bucks.

The brakes are still draging, but i'm yet to find a rear disk break construction that doens't drag and eat up my rear disk.
 

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What kinda cookie dough is the caliper made off?
Aluminum

Check the brake lever pivot. It can benefit from cleaning and a small dab of grease.
 
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Aluminum

Check the brake lever pivot. It can benefit from cleaning and a small dab of grease.
Yes. Absolutely. It's a hard-to-access place to try to get lubricant on. On my first Wee I had that problem.

Fixed it forever on the new (to me) Wee2. I had to buy a new rear brake lever anyway (long, sad story) so I had a machine shop guy machine a shallow groove into the lever cylinder, then he drilled and installed a grease fitting there. Turns out the bike shaft, onto which the lever mounts, is already grooved (didn't know that), so I didn't really have to groove my lever. Anyway, mine's all fixed up now. A shot of grease every now and then and no more dragging rear brake.
 

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A judicious squirt of chain lube would do the trick wouldn't it ?
Yes, I think it would, but I had trouble getting to the spot that needs the oil. I did oil that spot, or tried to, on my '07 Wee, but I'm glad I added a grease fitting to my '12 Wee.

Wasn't all that bad. Getting the lever off wasn't as bad as I thought it was gonna be (it comes off as part of a small assembly in that area).
 

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Rehab Threads

HF sells a small plastic box containing Drill, Tap Deburr Bit Set HF Item number 95529. This tool is also known as an Easy Out, or a Chaser Tap. The sizes are M3 - M10x 1.50, and inc. an M8 x 1.25. I use these to rehab bolt hole where cross threading occurred. Example: one of my luggage carrier M8 bolts was very hard to turn until it was completely out. After slowly turning the tool all the way into the hole, the damaged bolt turned in nicely. Obviously using this technique will cause the threads to be too large in the sense there will be more space between the bolt thread and the hole thread. I assume the strength of the fastener is less but don't know how to guestomate it, and I do not try to torque the bolt to spec. I've had to resort to this more often than I'd care to admit but it will fix the problems discussed above.
 

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here I go again

my son just noticed that the right hand face of my rear rotor is gouged - all the brake pad wearing material has been consumed - so its metal on metal - or similar. Other than that - it seemed to be working ok. The caliper has already been rebuilt the last time I thought it was dragging.

I will post up if I find anything definitive.
 

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the worn parts

the worn parts (photo)

other side was not yet gouged (it had a tiny amount of pad left). I am going to "wait and watch" . I lowered the foot brake pedal - and will try harder to keep my right foot from resting on it.

BTW - by unbolting the rotor and the caliber bracket I was able to swap out the rotor without removing the wheel - all I had to do was move the rear axle a little to the left and remove rotor and caliper bracket. This made the job easier.
 

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